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Manhattan Night Trailer


Manhattan Night sees its protagonist Porter Wren caught up in an unsolved murder case that sees his life and the lives of his family threatened. Wren is a New York City tabloid writer who has to meet three deadlines a week meaning that he is always on the hunt for a new story. One night he meets a seductive stranger by the name of Caroline Crowley who asks him to look into the unsolved crime of her husband's death, Wren jumps at this opportunity as it could be a great news story, little does he know that the case could leave his career in turmoil.

Continue: Manhattan Night Trailer

Opening Night Party For 'Noises Off' - Arrivals

Campbell Scott - Opening night party for Noises Off at the American Airlines Theatre - Arrivals. at American Airlines Theatre, - New York, New York, United States - Thursday 14th January 2016

Campbell Scott
Rob Mcclure, David Furr, Jeremy Herrin, Campbell Scott and Jeremy Shamos
Campbell Scott, Jeremy Shamos, David Furr and Rob Mcclure
Campbell Scott
Campbell Scott
Campbell Scott

Opening Night Of The Tribeca Film Festival

Kathleen McElfresh and Campbell Scott - A variety of stars were photographed as they arrived for the 2015 Tribeca Film Festival world premiere of 'Live From New York' which was held at The Beacon Theatre in New York City, New York, United States - Wednesday 15th April 2015

Kathleen Mcelfresh and Campbell Scott
Kathleen Mcelfresh and Campbell Scott
Campbell Scott
Kathleen Mcelfresh and Campbell Scott
Kathleen Mcelfresh and Campbell Scott

Video - Pharrell Takes His Hat To 'The Amazing Spider-Man 2' NY Premiere - Part 3


'Happy' singer Pharrell Williams and his famously large hat were spotted amongst the crowd at the New York premiere for 'The Amazing Spider-Man 2' alongside various other actors from the movies.

Continue: Video - Pharrell Takes His Hat To 'The Amazing Spider-Man 2' NY Premiere - Part 3

The Amazing Spider-man 2 Review


Good

As with the too-early franchise reboot in 2012, this sequel struggles to balance the demands of a teen romance with a superhero blockbuster. The interpersonal storylines are sharply written and skilfully played by the gifted cast, but the eye-catching effects sequences feel like little more than a shiny distraction. Action fans will love the way digitally animated Spidey swings more realistically than ever down the streets of New York, but the fact remains that these scenes are cartoons. And a new template is badly needed for this genre.

It kicks off as Peter (Andrew Garfield) nearly misses his high school graduation to save the city from another crazed nutcase. His girlfriend Gwen (Emma Stone) is fed up, and then crushed when Peter breaks up with her because he's worried about her safety. So she considers taking a place at Oxford University to get away. Meanwhile, Peter is also trying to understand the truth about why his parents (Campbell Scott and Embeth Davidtz) left him to be raised by his Aunt May (Sally Field). But he's interrupted from all of this by the arrival of old pal Harry (Dane DeHaan), back in town to inherit the family business from his dying dad (Chris Cooper) and in need of moral support from Peter.

In each of these three plot strands, Peter faces a significant dilemma that's beautifully played by Garfield as a cheeky, good guy who worries about the darkness all around him. And there's also a nefarious side-plot trying to take over the movie, as nerdy technician Max (Jamie Foxx) is transformed by an electric shock from Spider-man's biggest fan to a spark-emitting villain called Electro. This shift doesn't make sense on any level, and Harry also has a sudden personality change that's badly under-explained, forcing the film into a series of huge action showdowns along with a completely irrelevant aside about two colliding airplanes that feels tacked on to up the human stakes.

Continue reading: The Amazing Spider-man 2 Review

Opening Night Of Broadway's Machinal - Arrivals

Guest, Campbell Scott and Kathleen McElfresh - Opening night of Broadway's Machinal at the American Airlines Theatre - Arrivals. - New York, New York, United States - Friday 17th January 2014

Campbell Scott and Kathleen Mcelfresh
Campbell Scott
Campbell Scott
Campbell Scott

2013 USA Network Upfronts Held At Pier 36

Campbell Scott - 2013 USA Network Upfronts held at Pier 36 - Arrivals - New York City, United States - Wednesday 15th May 2013

Campbell Scott

The 2012 USA Network Upfront Presentation - Arrivals

Campbell Scott Thursday 17th May 2012 The 2012

The Amazing Spider-Man Trailer


Peter Parker is a socially unpopular high-school boy who lives with his Uncle Ben and Aunt May after his parents left him when he was very young for reasons unknown. He finds a clue to their disappearance in the form of his father's suitcase and his journey for an explanation takes him to Oscorp, the weapons manufacturer of New York, and the lab of his father's ex-business partner Dr. Curt Connors who offers him that explanation. Along his journey, the alter-egos of Connors (The Lizard) and Parker (Spider-Man) collide in a continuous battle of superpowers and Parker's feelings for his first high-school crush Gwen Stacy, whose father is a Police Captain with officers all over the city looking for Parker, intensify.

Continue: The Amazing Spider-Man Trailer

The Amazing Spider-Man Trailer


Peter Parker, at first glance, seems like a normal high schooler. However, he is a nerd and gets picked on by other students. He lives with his aunt and uncle, after his parents abandoned him as a young boy. And the weirdest fact of them all - he got bit by a radioactive spider one day whilst exploring a science lab, which gave him super powers.

Continue: The Amazing Spider-Man Trailer

The Amazing Spider-Man Trailer


As a young boy, Peter Parker's parents, Richard and Mary, sent their son to live with his aunt and uncle, Mary and Ben, 'for a little while'. Years later, Peter is still living with his relatives; his mother and father have not returned. He befriends and falls in love with Gwen Stacey at high school and the two of them start a relationship.

Continue: The Amazing Spider-Man Trailer

No End In Sight Review


Excellent
Due most probably to the immediacy of the graphic image, documentaries on the Iraq War have focused on the experience of soldiers and Iraqis on the ground. Films like Iraq in Fragments and The War Tapes are less about the how and why of the conflict as they are about the what of the actual fighting, what it looks and feels like from street level. The more in-depth casual discussions on the war have come from the ever-increasing mound of books on the subject; at least until Charles Ferguson's studious documentary No End in Sight, which will have you alternately slapping your forehead in stunned disbelief and shaking your head in disgust.

As a chronicle of stupidity, Ferguson's film is nearly beyond compare. Acting as sort of a Cliff Notes version of many of the better books on the many blunders in planning and leadership prior to the 2003 invasion -- particularly The Assassin's Gate by George Packer (who provides some of the best soundbites for the film) and Thomas E. Ricks' Fiasco -- the film lays out in no uncertain terms what went wrong, whose mistake it was, and what the results were. Fortunately for the film, but unfortunately for the world at large (not to mention thousands of Iraqis and Americans), those mistakes were legion, and hard to comprehend.

Continue reading: No End In Sight Review

Loverboy Review


Bad
Much like Robert Towne's recent adaptation of Ask the Dust, Kevin Bacon's Loverboy is a labor of love. Sometime in 2003, Kyra Sedgwick (Bacon's spouse) handed him a copy of Victoria Redel's novel, Loverboy, and both found themselves eager to bring the story to the screen. And similar to Towne's effort, Bacon is so enthusiastic about the material that he can't get his concentration correct.

Emily Stoll (Sedgwick) is in her late 20s and roaming the Midwest and just about everywhere else for the right ejaculate. After a miscarriage from a "no father," multi-partner pregnancy, she meets Paul (Campbell Scott) and in one night of passion, a child is conceived. The son, Paul aka Loverboy (Dominic Scott Kay), quickly becomes Emily's entire life, trying to make life a magical, ongoing discovery. Emily has nightmarish flashbacks of her lovebird parents (Bacon and Marisa Tomei) who were too busy being in love to take care of a child properly, and she daydreams of her fantasy mother, Mrs. Harker (Sandra Bullock). Loverboy eventually becomes wise to his mother's obsessive grasp on him and begins to revolt, especially when she tries to seduce Mark (Matt Dillon), a father figure. This, of course, can't end well.

Continue reading: Loverboy Review

The Dying Gaul Review


Good
In 1995, the internet was still a strange, scary destination for most Americans, a primary meeting place for pornography hounds and other assorted lonely creeps who sought out the thrilling anonymity of the web's myriad chat rooms. Based on one of his plays, Craig Lucas' (The Secret Lives of Dentists, Prelude to a Kiss) directorial debut The Dying Gaul is fascinated with the dangerous allure of these online social venues, which provide users with identity secrecy and, thus, the means to express taboo fantasies (and deal with emotionally corrosive issues) from the comfort and safety of home. Part movie industry critique and part Greek tragedy, Lucas' film charts the modem-enabled turmoil between a married Tinsletown power couple and an aspiring gay screenwriter in the luxurious Hollywood hills, a trio whose interpersonal dynamic is irreparably disrupted thanks to the nasty role-playing opportunities afforded by computers. Yet with its story of rampant duplicity and showbiz shallowness tied to a now technologically outdated mid-'90s milieu, and with its satire weighed down by banality, The Dying Gaul seems relevant only insofar as its cast effectively pinpoints the vengeful malice born from spurned love and squandered trust.

Jeffrey (Campbell Scott) is a bottom line-driven producer interested in Robert's (Peter Sarsgaard) script "The Dying Gaul," a semi-autobiographical tale about AIDS based on his relationship with his now-dead agent and partner Malcolm (Bill Camp). However, to make the project commercially viable, Jeffrey demands that Robert change the central couple from a homosexual to heterosexual duo. Jettisoning his integrity, Robert sells out and does as Jeffrey asks, in the process pocketing $1 million and establishing a close-knit friendship with Jeffrey and his failed screenwriter wife Elaine (Patricia Clarkson), whose life is so purposeless that learning how to control her multi-million dollar house's blinds constitutes an exciting afternoon. Yet the happy threesome's relationship is soon torn asunder when, after learning that Robert frequents chat rooms, Elaine strikes up an in-disguise online conversation with her new friend and learns that he's having an affair with Jeffrey. This devastating discovery frighteningly undercuts Elaine's sense of security and stability while also igniting a desire for retribution, leading to a dangerous game of cyberspace cat-and-mouse in which Elaine poses as the back-from-the-dead spirit of Malcolm and, ultimately, each character's true, less-than-savory personalities are drawn out into the blinding L.A. light of day.

Continue reading: The Dying Gaul Review

Off The Map Review


Excellent
Within the past seven years, Campbell Scott has quietly become an important indie hyphenate, producing and starring in notable art house circuit films including Big Night, Roger Dodger, and the current The Secret Lives of Dentists. His passion for the craft of acting is obvious; it's now also clearly visible in his own directing, with the unconventional and often beautiful family tale, Off the Map.

Based on the play by Joan Ackermann (and adapted by Ackermann for the screen), Off the Map recalls one summer in the life of an offbeat family living off the land in rural New Mexico. It's essentially a series of dialogue-driven scenarios that actors like Joan Allen and Sam Elliott can sink their teeth into; Scott guides them there while avoiding any unnecessary scene-chewing or melodrama that could come with the subject matter. That's an accomplishment in itself -- but the visual dreaminess and charm that Scott weaves into, and wraps around, his performances elevate the film into a poignant and thoughtful work of art.

Continue reading: Off The Map Review

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Campbell Scott Movies

Manhattan Night Trailer

Manhattan Night Trailer

Manhattan Night sees its protagonist Porter Wren caught up in an unsolved murder case that...

The Amazing Spider-man 2 Movie Review

The Amazing Spider-man 2 Movie Review

As with the too-early franchise reboot in 2012, this sequel struggles to balance the demands...

The Amazing Spider-Man Trailer

The Amazing Spider-Man Trailer

Peter Parker is a socially unpopular high-school boy who lives with his Uncle Ben and...

The Amazing Spider-Man Trailer

The Amazing Spider-Man Trailer

Peter Parker, at first glance, seems like a normal high schooler. However, he is a...

The Amazing Spider-Man Trailer

The Amazing Spider-Man Trailer

As a young boy, Peter Parker's parents, Richard and Mary, sent their son to live...

No End in Sight Movie Review

No End in Sight Movie Review

Due most probably to the immediacy of the graphic image, documentaries on the Iraq War...

Music and Lyrics Movie Review

Music and Lyrics Movie Review

It's not a complaint when I say that Hugh Grant seems to play the same...

Music and Lyrics Trailer

Music and Lyrics Trailer

Music and Lyrics Trailer Alex Fletcher (Hugh Grant) is a washed-up '80s pop star who's...

The Dying Gaul Movie Review

The Dying Gaul Movie Review

In 1995, the internet was still a strange, scary destination for most Americans, a primary...

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