Buck Henry

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Buck Henry Wednesday 30th June 2010 Opening night of The Public Theater production of 'The Winter's Tale' at Shakespeare In the Park at the Delacorte Theater - Arrivals. New York City, USA

Buck Henry
Buck Henry

Buck Henry Thursday 22nd April 2010 TCM Classic Film Festival opening night - 'A Star Is Born' premiere held at the Mann's Chinese Theater - Arrivals Los Angeles, California

Buck Henry
Buck Henry
Peter Bogdanovich, Tippi Hedren and Buck Henry

Buck Henry Friday 7th November 2008 Opening Night After Party for The New Group's production of Mouth To Mouth at the West Bank Cafe. New York City, USA

Buck Henry

Buck Henry Tuesday 2nd October 2007 attends Sony Pictures Classics' Premiere of 'Sleuth' at the Paris Theatre New York City, USA

Buck Henry

Buck Henry held at the Paris Theater New York Premiere of Sleuth Tuesday 2nd October 2007

Buck Henry

The Man Who Fell To Earth Review


Excellent
Sorry folks, Labyrinth was not David Bowie's best movie. It's arguably this, The Man Who Fell to Earth, a rambling and haunting science fiction movie unlike any you've ever seen. (Except perhaps 2001.)

Director Nicolas Roeg doesn't exactly clue us in to what's going on through the entire running of the film -- and even the ending has some ambiguity to it -- so the following synopsis is more of a rough guideline based on the acclaimed novel and personal conjecture. Bowie plays Thomas Newton, the assumed name of an alien who has landed on earth in the hopes of finding a way either to save his home planet, which has become a desert wasteland, or to figure out a way to get the rest of the homeland's survivors to earth. His plan is simple: Use his advanced technology to start a company that will instantly dominate most industries, and use the proceeds to further these ends.

Continue reading: The Man Who Fell To Earth Review

Gloria (1980) Review


Bad
John Cassavetes made some iffy movies during his career, but none is worse than the original Gloria, one of many films made with with his wife Gena Rowlands and proving that even her natural charm and ability can't muster its way through one of the worst stories ever told. Straight out of a Hallmark card comes this story of a pistol-totin' bad mama who protects a little Puerto Rican kid on the streets of New York from the hands of the mob. This movie is so saccharine and at the same time ridiculous that it's impossible to take seriously. And yet it goes on and on and on for over two hours. Appalling.

The Owl And The Pussycat Review


Good
In the grand tradition of movies like The Odd Couple, Butterflies are Free, and Barefoot in the Park comes The Owl and the Pussycat, with a mixmatched pair of roommates trying to make a go of it in a tiny New York City apartment. Like virtually all of these 1970s comedies, after frustration comes understanding -- and George Segal's failed writer combined with Barbra Streisand's fetish hooker makes for a lot of frustration indeed. After an hour of solid comedy, though, Pussycat meanders into the melodrama of a less-than-believable romance. Alas, life in the Big Apple is always complicated.

The Man Who Fell To Earth Review


Excellent
Sorry folks, Labyrinth was not David Bowie's best movie. It's arguably this, The Man Who Fell to Earth, a rambling and haunting science fiction movie unlike any you've ever seen. (Except perhaps 2001.)

Director Nicolas Roeg doesn't exactly clue us in to what's going on through the entire running of the film -- and even the ending has some ambiguity to it -- so the following synopsis is more of a rough guideline based on the acclaimed novel and personal conjecture. Bowie plays Thomas Newton, the assumed name of an alien who has landed on earth in the hopes of finding a way either to save his home planet, which has become a desert wasteland, or to figure out a way to get the rest of the homeland's survivors to earth. His plan is simple: Use his advanced technology to start a company that will instantly dominate most industries, and use the proceeds to further these ends.

Continue reading: The Man Who Fell To Earth Review

I'm Losing You Review


Good
This multi-storied film centers around Langella, dying of cancer, and how his imminent death (and the death of others) impacts the rest of the cast. Throw in another three or four soon-to-be-six-feet-unders (the most memorable and surprising being Elizabeth Perkins as a woman slowly dying of AIDS) and you've got yourself one hell of a depressing movie. Even those who aren't dying are obsessed with it (McCarthy hawks "death futures" -- reselling life insurance policies for dying people). Even if you're perfectly healthy, you'll probably start checking for lumps after this one.

Breakfast Of Champions Review


Bad
The word "unfilmable" is often bandied about over cult classic books. That never stops people from filming them.

Witness The English Patient, which turned out to be filmable after all. And then there was Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, which wasn't. But maybe unfilmable is the wrong word. Breakfast of Champions might have proved filmable, but it sure isn't watchable.

Continue reading: Breakfast Of Champions Review

Town & Country Review


Weak
Past-their-prime actors don't die -- they pick up studio paychecks for hack projects like Town & Country. This drama/comedy/message-movie overflows with wannabe heartfelt sentiment like a three-day old colostomy bag.

Long mired in rewrites, delays, and dismal test screenings, it's easy to see why the studio gods postponed delivery of this stinking mess until the dumping grounds of spring, just before the big summer releases. We get two strong actors -- Warren Beatty and Diane Keaton -- mixed together with a few lesser actors -- Goldie Hawn, Garry Shandling, and Andie McDowell -- and they all get to wade through an aimless script (polished up by Buck Henry!) about infidelity, homosexuality, and dysfunctional family affairs. It would have been better served heading straight to video.

Continue reading: Town & Country Review

Aria Review


Bad
Every decade or so, those wacky independents try this stunt -- getting a bunch of Big Name Directors together to make a collaborative movie. Invariably, it sucks (see Lumiere and Company), but rarely does it suck so hard as it does in Aria.

The conceit this time: Each director takes a piece of classical music and sets it to film -- mostly without dialogue and invariably without any sense whatsoever.

Continue reading: Aria Review

Catch-22 Review


Extraordinary
A wry and sarcastic (and thick as hell) book about the ridiculous duplicity of war? Sounds like a movie to me.

And so it did to Mike Nichols and Buck Henry, collaborators on The Graduate who conspired once again to make one of the greats of cinema. While Catch-22 has none of the cachet of other war movies (and we'll get to that...), it's by far one of the best out there, ranking with Platoon, Full Metal Jacket, and Apocalypse Now as one of the greats.

Continue reading: Catch-22 Review

Lisa Picard Is Famous Review


OK

Lisa Picard is a struggling New York actress who has had her 15 minutes and just doesn't realize it yet. She starred in a rather carnal breakfast-in-bed commercial for Wheat Chex that made her notorious and got her fired from her steady job playing "Sally Starfish" in a production that tours elementary schools.

"If the director's cut could be seen, this would be a non-issue," she grouses in "Lisa Picard Is Famous" -- an inept documentary by an under-prepared filmmaker who has decided this starlet is on the verge of being discovered and he's determined to capture the moment when it happens.

In actuality, "Lisa Picard Is Famous" is a mock documentary by actor-director Griffin Dunne ("Practical Magic," "Addicted to Love") -- and a whimsically sardonic concept that just doesn't quite congeal because the movie is more uncomfortable than it is funny.

Continue reading: Lisa Picard Is Famous Review

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David Bowie Wins Big, But Grime Artists Go Home Empty-Handed At The 2017 BRIT Awards

David Bowie Wins Big, But Grime Artists Go Home Empty-Handed At The 2017 BRIT Awards

David Bowie and Rag'n'Bone Man both won two awards at the 2017 BRIT Awards at the O2 Arena in London last night.

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Skepta To Headline Wireless Festival 2017 With Chance The Rapper And The Weeknd

Skepta To Headline Wireless Festival 2017 With Chance The Rapper And The Weeknd

The grime superstar will top the bill on Saturday night at Finsbury Park's Wireless Festival in July, with The Weeknd and Chance The Rapper also...

Martin Scorsese's 'The Irishman' Reportedly Moving To Netflix

Martin Scorsese's 'The Irishman' Reportedly Moving To Netflix

Martin Scorsese's upcoming 'The Irishman', featuring Robert De Niro, is reportedly moving to Netflix from Paramount.

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Buck Henry Movies

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The Last Shot Movie Review

The Last Shot Movie Review

This is a sometimes hilarious sometimes flat takeoff on the allure of Hollywood make believe...

Town & Country Movie Review

Town & Country Movie Review

Past-their-prime actors don't die -- they pick up studio paychecks for hack projects like Town...

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