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Gods Of Egypt Trailer


When Set brutally murderers his brother, Osiris the great deities of ancient Egypt are upset, non-more so than his wife Isis. Piecing her husband - and fellow god - Osiris back together, she manages to resurrect him for long enough to conceive Horus. So begins a lifetime of battles for the Kingdom.

Set, the brother of Osiris and god of storms, disorder and violence on one side and Horus, the son of Osiris on the other. When Set and Horus go head to head in combat, the mortal citizens of Egypt hope for one victor (Horus) but in a moment of weakness, Set makes his move and steals the eyes of Horus.

Soon after the downfall of Horus, Set takes over Egypt and enslaves the mortals, knowning there's little hope of being saved, one mortal hero decides to help steal the eyes of Horus back in order to gain the trust of the cast out god. To take the kingdom back (and save Bek's love), he and Horus face vast armies of mortals and immortal demons cast under Set's spell.

Continue: Gods Of Egypt Trailer

Star Wars: Revenge Of The Sith Trailer


After five long years, the Clone Wars are still raging across the galaxy. Count Dooku (Christopher Lee), the Separatist leader and his minion, General Grievous, have captured the Chancellor of the Galactic Republic. Jedi master Obi-Wan Kenobi (Ewan McGregor) and Anakin Skywalker (Hayden Christensen) are tasked with his rescue. Once the chancellor is saved and Dooku is defeated, the location of General Grievous is discovered. If the Jedi can send a strike force to capture or kill Grievous, then they will be able to end the war entirely. But there is a darkness growing within Anakin, and the Jedi Order are slowly starting to become aware of it. But as the power of the Chancellor continues to grow, and his hold over Anakin grows too, leading to a revelation which will forever change the galaxy, and lead to a greater, more destructive war.

Continue: Star Wars: Revenge Of The Sith Trailer

Mad Max Beyond Thunderdome Review


Good
Two men enter, one man leave!

Let's face it, Mad Max Beyond Thunderdome isn't terribly memorable aside from its to-the-death cage battles, with Mel Gibson's road warrior doing a little battle for Bartertown (headed by a ridiculously over the top Tina Turner). It will all end as expected -- with a bunch of crazy car (and train!) stunts, but why subject us to Mad Max becoming a hero to a bunch of urchin children living out in the boonies? As Turner herself said, we don't need another hero.

The Matrix Revolutions Review


OK
With their third (and hopefully, final) Matrix movie, the Wachowski brothers have delivered a dud so disappointing, they may as well have bussed in Ewoks to save Zion.

To understand why, let's just dive right in.

Continue reading: The Matrix Revolutions Review

The Road Warrior Review


Excellent
Though this was the second movie in the Mad Max series, The Road Warrior's post-apocalyptic setting is the one you probably think about when you consider the films. Road Warrior introduced the dystopic battle for oil, warring tribes, and mohawked-players, with Mel Gibson's renegade doing battle with them (his trusty dingo in tow) on the desert flats of Australia. (Believe it or not, the first film took place in the present day, with no WWIII in sight.) The Road Warrior is lots more fun than the original, in my opinion, delightful in its inconsistencies (if they don't have any gas, why does everyone waste so much of it by riding around in circles all the time) and in its over-the-top acting, set design, and kooky plot.

Continue reading: The Road Warrior Review

Star Wars: Episode III - Revenge Of The Sith Review


Very Good
Here's your "Revenge of the Sith" review in a nutshell: It may well be the best of all six "StarWars" movies -- with the caveat that you need to have seen the other five films to truly grasp its significance.

The cunning dexterity and gravitas with which George Lucas snaps into place every remaining puzzle piece in his epic 30-year storyarc is remarkable. The talent of Hayden Christensen will surprise his detractors as he portrays a complex, compounding crisis of conflicting loyalties thattear Anakin Skywalker apart, leading him to slip ever more rapidly toward the Dark Side of the Force. The potent sensations of betrayal and inevitabilitythat fuel the climactic duel between the young Jedi knight and his former master Obi-Wan Kenobi are positively goosepimpling, even though every "StarWars" fan knows the outcome and has been waiting for this moment for years.

These elements, coupled with much improved dialogue, far fewer scenes transparently designed to foster inevitable tie-in video games,and genuinely compelling emotions make up for the myriad of shortcomings that plagued the previoustwo"Star Wars" prequels.

Opening in the midst the Clone Wars between the crumbling galactic republic and an alliance of separatists that is really a frontfor the evil Sith Lords (all those villains called "Darth This" and "Darth That"), "Star Wars: Episode III -- Revenge ofthe Sith" is surprisingly character-driven. The plot revolves around the volatile, brash young Anakin being appointed by the increasingly powerfulChancellor Palpatine (soon to be revealed as Darth Sidious) to be his personal representative on the Jedi Council, which has for centuries tried to maintainpeace in this galaxy far, far away.

Continue reading: Star Wars: Episode III - Revenge Of The Sith Review

Peter Pan Review


Good

In an era of severely dumbed-down children's movies, the first live-action "Peter Pan" picture since the silent era does something extraordinary -- it un-Disneyfies the story, revives the deeper themes of J.M. Barrie's original book and play, and emerges as an appropriately wily family-fare delight.

From its exquisite, Maxfield-Parish-inspired Neverland of golden sunlight, lush green forests and cotton-candy clouds to the quintessently pubescent and enigmatically tingly chemistry between Peter (the strangely pretty 14-year-old Jeremy Sumpter) and Wendy (the even prettier 13-year-old Rachel Hurd-Wood), the film is a vivid and surprisingly visceral experience.

Director P.J. Hogan ("My Best Friend's Wedding") evokes the true wonder of childhood in the eyes of his young stars as Peter Pan, the mythical leafy-clad boy who refused to grow up, hovers with the power of happy thoughts and fairy dust outside the third-story window of Wendy Darling on a snowy night in 1900s London, engrossed in the stories of adventure that the girl spins with wide-eyed zeal for her little bothers John and Michael.

Continue reading: Peter Pan Review

Finding Nemo Review


Good
Offering further proof that the folks at Pixar are ceaselessly, unflaggingly more clever and imaginative than anyone else working in big-budget feature animation, the underwater CGI-animated "Finding Nemo" opens today -- and it's smarter, funnier and more entertaining than any other all-ages film so far this year.While Disney's in-house animators have been assembly-lining prosaic sequels ("The Jungle Book 2," "Return to Never Land") and re-imagined misfires ("Treasure Planet") -- and very occasionally coloring a little bit outside the lines ("Lilo and Stitch") -- the computer-'toon platoon at Pixar's Emeryville, California studios is supplying the Mouse House with delightfully creative products like "Monster's Inc." and this new adventure, in which an apprehensive, over-protective clown-fish father traverses the sea in search of his missing son.

The youngster was scooped up near his reef home by some monstrous, two-legged land creature in scuba gear and deposited into a Australian dentist's fish tank, populated by a colorful crew of fellow captives who help little Nemo (voice of Alexander Gould) hatch an escape plan. In the meantime, Marlin -- his fretful father with the perfectly anxiety-ridden intonations of Albert Brooks -- ventures deeper into the deep blue than he has ever dared before, determined to find the boy.

Helped along the way, if "helped" is the word for it, by a dingbat blue tang with short-term memory problems (and the oh-so-apropos voice of Ellen DeGeneres), Marlin finds his courage in dangerous adventures (mines and shipwrecks) and discovers friends in the forms of a surfer-dude sea turtle (voiced by Andrew Stanton, the movie's director), an astute pelican (Geoffrey Rush) who becomes his transportation into the dentist's office, and a trio of 12-stepping sharks who are trying to go vegetarian (including future "Hulk" Eric Bana and Barry Humphries, aka "Dame Edna").

Resourceful in its storytelling (the East Australian Current which Marlin must travel is akin to an underwater freeway crossed with a roller coaster) and reliably, steadily hilarious ("Hey, you're a clown fish," observe all the dopier sea critters who meet mopey Marlin. "Tell us a joke!"), "Finding Nemo" is also astounding to look at. Like a fantastical scuba dive, the picture's always-in-motion undersea universe would be downright photo-realistic if Stanton and his animators hadn't dialed up the cartoonishness just enough to give all the fish googly ping-pong-ball eyes.

Continue reading: Finding Nemo Review

The Matrix Revolutions Review


OK

The eye-popping, heart-stopping last hour and a half of "The Matrix Revolutions" more than makes up for everything plodding and ponderous that has taken place since the mind-blowing first hour of the 1999 original.

Astonishing in scale and momentous in scope, it encompasses a spectacular battle between the scrappy, out-numbered but heavily armed defenders of Zion (humanity's last refugee city hidden deep beneath the Earth's scorched surface) and a million-strong swarm of enemy sentinels (those frightening, giant squid-shaped robots) invading from the machine-ruled surface world.

But the monstrous melee may be for naught if uber-human messiah Neo (Keanu Reeves) cannot defeat the invincibly evil, incalculably self-replicating rogue computer program known as Agent Smith (Hugo Weaving) in a simultaneous, nuclear-strength airborne-kung-fu showdown inside what's left of the crumbling Matrix (that virtual world pulled over the eyes of the comatose majority of mankind kept in stasis by the machines who feed off our life-force).

Continue reading: The Matrix Revolutions Review

The Lord Of The Rings: The Return Of The King Review


Good

By the time hobbit hero Frodo Baggins (Elijah Wood) finally -- finally! -- struggles to the top of Mount Doom, where at the climax of "The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King" he must cast into its volcanic fires the malevolently omnipotent Ring that has been slowly consuming his psyche for three movies now, many of the nit-picky things that have gotten on my nerves throughout all the "Lord of the Rings" flicks had come to a head.

So many times now has Frodo's whiney, obsequious traveling companion Samwise Gamgee (Sean Austin) begun boo-hoo-hooing that I started rooting for him to be chucked into the lava along with the jewelry. One too many times has a lucky coincidence saved our hero, as when in this picture he's captured by the demonic, bad-tempered Orcs, only to be rescued moments later when his two guards -- the only two guards in an entire tower it seems -- are conveniently distracted by fighting with each other.

And once too often has director Peter Jackson assumed that the previous installments will be fresh in minds of the audience. That's a pretty safe bet for his fan base, but for the unobsessed, "Return of the King" -- like "The Two Towers" before it -- has many what-did-I-miss? moments. For example, in one of two climactic battle scenes, a never-identified army of fearsome face-painted foes riding atop gigantic elephants appears on the flank of the protagonists' battalion, prompting the question, "Who the heck are these guys?" (Apparently they were in the second movie too, but pardon me for not having seen it since last year.)

Continue reading: The Lord Of The Rings: The Return Of The King Review

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'Will And Grace' Comes Back For Mini Episode To Voice Support For Hillary Clinton

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The cast had teased something big was coming and all was revealed on Monday night.

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Justin Theroux Reveals Why Marriage To Jennifer Aniston Works

The couple have recently found themselves dragged into the Brangelina divorce and even forced to deny split rumours.

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Drake Launches Intense New Short Film 'Please Forgive Me'

Drake Launches Intense New Short Film 'Please Forgive Me'

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Bruce Spence Movies

Gods Of Egypt Trailer

Gods Of Egypt Trailer

When Set brutally murderers his brother, Osiris the great deities of ancient Egypt are upset,...

Star Wars: Revenge Of The Sith Trailer

Star Wars: Revenge Of The Sith Trailer

After five long years, the Clone Wars are still raging across the galaxy. Count Dooku...

The Matrix Revolutions Movie Review

The Matrix Revolutions Movie Review

With their third (and hopefully, final) Matrix movie, the Wachowski brothers have delivered a dud...

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Star Wars: Episode III - Revenge of the Sith Movie Review

Star Wars: Episode III - Revenge of the Sith Movie Review

Here's your "Revenge of the Sith" review in a nutshell: It may well be the...

Peter Pan Movie Review

Peter Pan Movie Review

In an era of severely dumbed-down children's movies, the first live-action "Peter Pan" picture since...

The Lord Of The Rings: The Return Of The King Movie Review

The Lord Of The Rings: The Return Of The King Movie Review

By the time hobbit hero Frodo Baggins (Elijah Wood) finally -- finally! -- struggles to...

Finding Nemo Movie Review

Finding Nemo Movie Review

Offering further proof that the folks at Pixar are ceaselessly, unflaggingly more clever and imaginative...

The Matrix Revolutions Movie Review

The Matrix Revolutions Movie Review

The eye-popping, heart-stopping last hour and a half of "The Matrix Revolutions" more than makes...

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