Bruce Joel Rubin

Bruce Joel Rubin

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Bruce Joel Rubin, Matthew Warchus and Lunt-Fontanne Theatre - Bruce Joel Rubin and Matthew Warchus Monday 23rd April 2012 Broadway opening night of 'Ghost The Musical' at the Lunt-Fontanne Theatre - Curtain Call.

Dave Stewart, Bruce Joel Rubin, Richard Fleeshman and Lunt-Fontanne Theatre - Dave Stewart, Bruce Joel Rubin, Caissie Levy, Richard Fleeshman and Glen Ballard Thursday 15th March 2012 Photo call after the first preview performance of the Broadway musical 'Ghost', held at the Lunt-Fontanne Theatre.

Dave Stewart, Bruce Joel Rubin, Richard Fleeshman and Lunt-fontanne Theatre
Dave Stewart, Bruce Joel Rubin, Richard Fleeshman and Lunt-fontanne Theatre
Dave Stewart, Bruce Joel Rubin, Richard Fleeshman and Lunt-fontanne Theatre
Dave Stewart and Lunt-fontanne Theatre
Dave Stewart and Lunt-fontanne Theatre

The Time Traveler's Wife Review


Excellent
Adapting Audrey Niffenegger's wonderfully complex novel to the screen can't have been easy, but Rubin (Ghost) has written a thoroughly engaging film. The heavy emotional tone makes it feel a bit girly, but it's still a terrific story.Henry (Bana) has time-travelled since the night his mother (Nolden) died in a car crash. He can't control his "trips", although he seems to go to places with an emotional resonance. When he first meets Clare (McAdams), she's in her 30s and has known him since she was 6 (Proulx). As a result of this paradox, their relationship develops very differently for each of them. Eventually they find friends (Livingston and McLean) who are in on Henry's condition. And a doctor (Tobolowsky) who may be able to help.Director Schwentke invests the film with a lush visual style that circles around the characters as they try to make sense of their life together. Subtle effects and clever editing work extremely well, even if Mychael Danna's music is a little too insistently weepy. And while the premise presents Henry's condition as something like epilepsy, the film can hardly help but start feeling like a terminal illness drama, as signs of impending tragedy start to appear.Bana is good in what's essentially a thankless role. The script doesn't offer him much personality beyond earnestness, so Bana plays him as a nice guy just trying to muddle through. Opposite him, McAdams is a wonderful breath of fresh air, really capturing Clare's steely resolve and quiet pain. Livingston and Tobolowsky are also extremely good in far too few scenes.There's definitely the sense that this film is edited down from a richer, more detailed novel. One problem is that Henry's ageing is far too subtle, so we're never quite sure which time he's travelling from (see Christopher Nolan's Memento or, better yet, Following, for how to do this well). And although we notice loose threads and missing scenes, the editors have done a remarkable job of making such a fragmented tale hold together both emotionally and logically.

And in the end, the film compellingly explores the nature of relationships while quietly moving us to all kinds of tears.

Deadly Friend Review


OK
Before she was Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Kristy Swanson was, er, a robot. Deadly Friend has to be one of the guiltiest of all guilty pleasures, a Wes Craven-directed thriller about a new kid in town, who has invented a robot that would be considered sophisticated even today, but which has violent tendencies. Lest you think the little robot is going to start killing people, think again: The girl next door (Swanson) gets beat up and accidentally killed by her abusive dad, so our genius hero sneaks into the morgue and implants a robot chip into her head. Presto: zombie robot Kristy Swanson is up and at 'em and getting revenge. Best scene: Robo-Kristy hurls a basketball at a poor lady's head, causing it to explode. A basketball. Deadly friend, indeed.

The Last Mimzy Review


Very Good
A mimzy -- to answer your burning question -- is a tattered, plush bunny stuffed with cotton and an alien nervous system that gives the doll artificial intelligence. Scientists from a dying future need a sample of good DNA, so they teleport the last of these rabbits to a Seattle beach in our present day, where precocious siblings Noah (Chris O'Neil) and Emma Wilder (Rhiannon Leigh Wryn) scoop the toy up and bring it home.

So begins Robert Shaye's pleasant adventure The Last Mimzy, inspired by Lewis Padgett's short story Mimsy Were the Borogoves, which should do for sci-fi exploration what Robert Rodriguez's Spy Kids franchise did for family espionage. The adults in Noah's life -- from his parents (Joely Richardson, Timothy Hutton) to his science teacher (Rainn Wilson) -- are too caught up in their daily routine to notice that the boy is changing. It isn't until Mimzy causes a citywide blackout that the military -- personified by Michael Clarke Duncan -- comes snooping around. The movie, at this point, begins to mimic E.T. without actually becoming its emotional equivalent.

Continue reading: The Last Mimzy Review

Ghost Review


Very Good
With a premise this stupid, it's hard to believe that Ghost became not just a mega-blockbuster but -- and you may have forgotten this -- the winner of two Oscars. Sure, most people remember Whoopi Goldberg's Best Supporting Actress win, but can you believe it also took home a Best Original Screeplay trophy? Ghost. You know, the one with Patrick Swayze loving up his wife from beyond the grave.

Watching Ghost again, 17 years after its release, it holds up surprisingly well. Or at least, it holds up as well as it did when it was originally released. There's a goodly amount of cheese on display here, but a surprising degree of restraint too. And that's down-right shocking: The director was Jerry Zucker, of Airplane! and Naked Gun fame. Ghost remains one of the few "serious" movies he's ever been involved with.

Continue reading: Ghost Review

Stuart Little 2 Review


Very Good
The term "little" works well in describing Rob Minkoff's Stuart Little 2. After all, this cuddly sequel to the 1999 hit is a little more visually polished, a little funnier, and a little more madcap. However, given the film's thin little plot and threadbare character development, there also appears to be little reason to make a Stuart sequel, save for lining the pockets of those involved with a little more money.

Little 2 starts off strong enough, reintroducing dad Fredrick (Hugh Laurie), mom Eleanor (Geena Davis), son George (Jonathan Lipnicki), and adopted child Stuart (voice of Michael J. Fox), who's actually a talking mouse. Since last we met the Little clan, the family has added baby girl Martha, which gives Eleanor someone else to dote over besides her pint-sized sons. Speaking of, Stuart's depressed because George is outgrowing the novelty of having a kid brother.

Continue reading: Stuart Little 2 Review

Deep Impact Review


Very Good
I admit it. I'm a sap for the touchy-feely business sometimes.

Deep Impact makes no apologies for being a sob-fest. I mean, how else do you smash a comet into the earth without killing off a few hundred million people, and breaking a few hearts in the process? As the first disaster-from-space film of the year, Deep Impact sets the bar at an interesting level. It's not an action film, although it has action elements. It's not a thriller, although suspense is in the mix. It's more a drama than anything else, the main story lines being a reporter (Téa Leoni) estranged from her father, a young astronomer (Wood) who finds he can't abandon his girlfriend, and a codgery astronaut (Robert Duvall) who gains acceptance among a younger crew.

Continue reading: Deep Impact Review

Bruce Joel Rubin

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Bruce Joel Rubin Movies

The Last Mimzy Movie Review

The Last Mimzy Movie Review

A mimzy -- to answer your burning question -- is a tattered, plush bunny stuffed...

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Stuart Little 2 Movie Review

Stuart Little 2 Movie Review

The term "little" works well in describing Rob Minkoff's Stuart Little 2. After all,...

Deep Impact Movie Review

Deep Impact Movie Review

I admit it. I'm a sap for the touchy-feely business sometimes.Deep Impact makes no...

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