Bruce Davison

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Inherent Vice LA Premiere

Bruce Davison - Inherent Vice LA Premiere at TCL Chinese Theater - Los Angeles, California, United States - Wednesday 10th December 2014

Bruce Davison

Los Angeles premiere of 'Inherent Vice'

Bruce Davison - Los Angeles premiere of 'Inherent Vice' - Arrivals at TCL Chinese Theatre - Hollywood, California, United States - Wednesday 10th December 2014

Bruce Davison
Bruce Davison
Bruce Davison
Bruce Davison
Bruce Davison

A&E's 'Bates Motel' and 'Those Who Kill' Premiere Party

Bruce Davison - A&E's 'Bates Motel' and 'Those Who Kill' Premiere Party at Warwick - Arrivals - Los Angeles, California, United States - Wednesday 26th February 2014

The ADG Awarda

Bruce Davison - The 18th Annual ADG Awards - Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 9th February 2014

Bruce Davison

18th Annual Art Directors Guild Excellence In Production Design Awards_Show

Bruce Davison - 18th Annual Art Directors Guild Excellence In Production Design Awards_Show At The Beverly Hilton Hotel - Beverly Hills, California, United States - Sunday 9th February 2014

Bruce Davison
Bruce Davison
Bruce Davison
Bruce Davison
Bruce Davison

The Lords of Salem Review


Good

Rob Zombie has matured as a filmmaker, as witnessed by this well-structured horror shocker, which plays with both historical events and familiar movie imagery to keep us unnerved even if it's ultimately rather silly. Best of all is the way he remembers the value of schlock both to entertain and to gross us out. And it's his old-style touches that make the film much scarier than the usual shock-and-go horror movies.

The story draws on the 17th century Salem Witch Trials, at which women were brutally executed for suspicion of witchcraft. In present day Salem, free-spirited DJ Heidi (Moon Zombie) receives a mysterious record from an unknown band called The Lords, and when she plays it people start behaving strangely. Historical expert Francis (Davison) takes an interest in the record due to its odd tones, but he begins to worry that something nasty might be afoot. Indeed, Heidi starts having freaky dreams and visions. And it becomes apparent that she's the fulfilment of a dark prophesy involving the spawn of Satan himself.

Moon Zombie is terrific as the confused heroine who thinks what's happening is related to her recent decision to give up hard drugs. But of course, we know better. And we also know that she certainly should not trust the three cackling sisters (Geeson, Quinn and Wallace) who live downstairs. In addition, we see flashback scenes from 1696 in which a preacher takes on a coven of naked witches who dance around a bonfire led by their witchy leader (Foster). Yes, Zombie packs the movie with nutty ceremonies, grisly apparitions and naked, blood-soaked women.

Continue reading: The Lords of Salem Review

Camp Hell Review


Good
Even with some unnerving supernatural elements, the scariest thing about this low-key horror film is the earnest spirituality of the Christian community. The grounded approach and honest performances are provocative and unsettling. As is the fact that it's based on a true story.

Against his will, teenager Tommy (Denton) is sent to a Camp Hope by his deeply religious parents (Delany and McCarthy). More like a military bootcamp than a week of summer fun, the camp is run by a cult-like covenant community. The rules Father McAllister (Davison) enforces are painfully strict, although Tommy scores points because he's reading Dante. Fortunately, no one knows about his crush on Melissa (de Angelis). Meanwhile, after a violent demon-related incident, Daniel (Eisenberg) has been in a mental health facility for six months.

Continue reading: Camp Hell Review

Breach Review


Good
Moving briskly from equivocator Stephen Glass to the chairman of the Benedict Arnold Fan Club, Robert Hanssen, director Billy Ray turns his tonal focus from Shattered Glass's journalistic felony to high crime in the intelligence agency. In what seems to be a new trend of cinematically capturing events before they have actually played out, Breach reenacts what is widely accepted as the greatest fracture of FBI security in the history of the organization.

Following possible terrorists and their contacts, Eric O'Neil (Ryan Phillipe) eagerly tries to discuss bureau protocol with his team, only to be ignored and have his well-prepared report on the subject shoved back in his face. That is, until he is dragged into a bureau conference room on a Sunday to meet with his superior and head agent Kate Burroughs (Laura Linney). It's here that O'Neil is asked to shadow Russian intelligence specialist Robert Hanssen (Chris Cooper) for what is originally agreed to be sexually perverse activities. It isn't till O'Neil is taken under wing by the intelligence expert that Burroughs reveals that Hanssen has actually been selling information to the Russians for some time and has cost the government billions of dollars and uncountable agent lives.

Continue reading: Breach Review

X-Men Review


OK
Well, comic book freaks can take a breather, as another sci-fi fantasy hits the big screen, this time in the long-awaited, highly-anticipated, it-better-be-good X-Men.

Without too much regret, I can say that X-Men will be palatable to fans and newbies alike. It's not a great film, but it will probably follow the arc of the Superman and Batman movies -- tons of sequels of variable quality until an abrupt and dismal end a decade later.

Continue reading: X-Men Review

It's My Party Review


Excellent
Like the outstanding Longtime Companion, Randal Kleiser's It's My Party shows what happens as AIDS rips apart a tight-knit circle of friends both gay and straight. The disease is claiming the life of the leader of their pack, a charismatic architect named Nick (Eric Roberts), and the experience is life-changing for all who know him.

Given just a few days to live (a rather contrived Dark Victory-style setup but one that is apparently based on a true story), Nick decides to commit suicide rather than suffer at the end the way so many of his AIDS-afflicted friends have. But before he goes, he decides to throw a two-day party to which he will invite all his friends, hand out parting gifts, and say goodbye with laughs and drinks rather than with tears and sadness.

Continue reading: It's My Party Review

Dahmer Review


Good
David Jacobson brings his fascination with serial killer Jeffrey Dahmer to the big screen in this impressive but occasionally wandering biopic. Dahmer wisely avoids turning its antihero (played gamely by Jeremy Renner) into a monster, treating him like any other troubled twentysomething with problems at home and at work. Jacobson doesn't put the blame on Dahmer's mildly oppressive father (Bruce Davison) -- in fact, we're given almost no motivation for his crimes at all, except that the guy is basically insane.

And oh -- the crimes. Although Jacobson again keeps most of the gore off-camera, Dahmer's attempts at zombifying his random victims, severing their extremities, and practicing various forms of execution are eye-opening enough to make you want to avert your gaze. Is it because the story is true that it's so disturbing? The movie was shot largely in Milwuakee, on the very street where Dahmer lived and did his deeds. However, the movie goes a little light with some of the facts -- in an attempt to humanize the man, we don't see his attempts at cannibalism or the large vat in which he decomposed his victims. We also don't see him get caught; the movie ends with Jeffrey just wandering into the forest.

Continue reading: Dahmer Review

X-Men Review


OK
Well, comic book freaks can take a breather, as another sci-fi fantasy hits the big screen, this time in the long-awaited, highly-anticipated, it-better-be-good X-Men.

Without too much regret, I can say that X-Men will be palatable to fans and newbies alike. It's not a great film, but it will probably follow the arc of the Superman and Batman movies -- tons of sequels of variable quality until an abrupt and dismal end a decade later.

Continue reading: X-Men Review

Short Cuts Review


Good
While one could argue that Robert Altman's 1993 film Short Cuts was simply an updating of his 1975 classic Nashville, with a much higher quotient of star power and slightly more prurient subject matter - an attempt to keep the once iconic filmmaker from straying into the shadowy irrelevance like so many of his '70s peers - and while that argument could very well be true, that doesn't deprive Short Cuts of any of its power, or disprove the fact that it's ultimately a better film.

Spinning together a series of short stories from the master of the form, Raymond Carver, Altman takes some 20-odd Los Angelenos and twists their lives together seemingly just for the fun of how their individual little lives play out and connect up, like a puppetmaster who can't stop adding new puppets to his repertoire. To flesh out his tapestry of early '90s Southern California life, Altman has a fine batch of actors and actresses, including everyone from the best of their generation (Jennifer Jason Leigh, Robert Downey Jr) to the solidly respectable but not terribly exciting choices (Julianne Moore, Matthew Modine, Madeleine Stowe) to oddly effective musician stunt casting (Lyle Lovett, Tom Waits, Huey Lewis) to one lordly presence (Jack Lemmon).

Continue reading: Short Cuts Review

Runaway Jury Review


Extraordinary
It's a sunny weekday in beautiful New Orleans as a middle-aged, white-collar businessman arrives at his office. He settles into a chair behind his desk and ponders a song in his head. He can't think of the words, so he calls his secretary into the office. He explains to her that he will be celebrating his young daughter's birthday later today, and he promised to sing this song for her. The secretary smiles warmly and helps him remember the lyrics.

Suddenly, horror and chaos erupt as gunfire interrupts their singing. The businessman instructs the secretary to take shelter behind his desk as he locks the office door. After a moment, the gunfire stops, and he cautiously peeks outside the door -- only to be shot point blank in the head by the gunman, who then turns the weapon on himself.

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The King Is Alive Review


Weak
The premise is irresistible, combining dark humor with existential crisis. A busload of travelers gets lost in the Namibian desert, hundreds of miles from anywhere. After predicting this merry band of survivors will soon be killing each other over a sip of water, one member of the party suggests they stage an amateur performance of William Shakespeare's King Lear. At first, it's simply an enjoyable way to fiddle away the endless hours. Before long, however, this cast of laymen discover meaning and dangerous irony in the text. "You don't have to worry," assures their resident Goneril (Janet McTeer): "Nobody falls in love. And everybody dies in the end."

Kristian Levring's The King is Alive operates on a conceptual, pseudo-intellectual level, perhaps a touch too orderly to convey true madness. As the players become embroiled in King Lear, jealous Catherine (Romane Bohringer) plots against young hipster Gina (Jennifer Jason Leigh), who won the much-envied role of Cordelia. Meanwhile, disgruntled housewife Liz (McTeer) seduces the exotic black bus driver (Vusi Kunene) before the very eyes of her passive husband (Bruce Davison). As the actor playing King Lear (Brion James) quickly falls to pieces from dysentery, the scholarly director (David Bradley) watches the proceedings with detached malice, chuckling, "Is man no more than this?" And whatever became of Aussie survivalist Jack (Miles Anderson), who took off into the desert to find help?

Continue reading: The King Is Alive Review

Bruce Davison

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