Britt Ekland

Britt Ekland

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Mark Zunino Atelier Opening - Inside

Britt Ekland , Luciana Paluzzi - Mark Zunino Atelier Opening - Inside at Mark Zunino Atelier - Beverly Hills, California, United States - Thursday 7th January 2016

Britt Ekland and Luciana Paluzzi
Luciana Paluzzi and Britt Ekland
Luciana Paluzzi and Britt Ekland
Britt Ekland

8th Annual BritWeek Launch Party

Britt Ekland - 8th Annual BritWeek Launch Party - Los Angeles, California, United States - Tuesday 22nd April 2014

Britt Ekland
Britt Ekland

Sue Wong's Fall 2014 'Edwardian Romance' Runway Show

Britt-Marie Eklun and Britt Ekland - Sue Wong's Fall 2014 'Edwardian Romance' Runway Show - Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 12th April 2014

Britt-marie Eklun and Britt Ekland

FIZZ Las Vegas Grand Opening And Elton John's Birthday Party - Arrivals

Britt Ekland, Sharon Osbourne and Kelly Osbourne - FIZZ Las Vegas grand opening and Elton John's birthday party at Caesars Palace Hotel & Casino - Arrivals - Las Vegas, Nevada, United States - Saturday 29th March 2014

Britt Ekland, Sharon Osbourne and Kelly Osbourne
Britt Ekland
Britt Ekland

Lost Star Naveen Andrews Reveals Details Of Heroin Addiction


Naveen Andrews Britt Ekland

Lost star Naveen Andrews has revealed how a drug addiction ruined his life for two years.

Andrews revealed details of his heroin abuse in an interview to be shown on Friday Night with Jonathan Ross.

The actor who plays Sayid on the popular TV show said: "There was a danger of me copping it… I lost two years to heroin.

"I was able to work; I don't know how I did it. You can take incredible abuse and still work… I collapsed on a job because of booze."

Andrews also revealed how he was warned of his behaviour while filming The English Patient.

"The turning point was I drove my son when I was drunk and he was scared, and that's when I decided to go into rehab in LA," he said.

The actor told Ross that he remained committed to the Lost series, despite having had worries about the show in the past.

"I'm still proud of the first season, around the third I though they were winging it, the writing was poor, [but] I'm definitely doing two more years."

Former Bond girl Britt Ekland and the cast of BBC1's new drama Mistresses will also appear on the show to be aired tonight.

Continue reading: Lost Star Naveen Andrews Reveals Details Of Heroin Addiction

The Man With The Golden Gun Review


Good
Christopher Lee always makes for an exceptional video. It's just too bad that it had to be in The Man with the Golden Gun, which ranks as one of James Bond's more absurd outings, involving a maniacal genius (Lee) who's assassinating folks and has Bond next on his list. Bond thus goes after this Scaramanga and uncovers the usual mega-weapon plot, this time featuring... wait for it... solar power. The theme song by Lulu (sample lyrics: "Love is required/Whenever he's hired/He comes just before the kiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiill") is original and a great example of high camp, much like the rest of the film. It's all gaudily good, right down to Hervé Villechaize(!), bikini-clad Britt Ekland, and the inimitable Clifton James as the vacationing Sheriff J.W. Pepper (introduced in Live and Let Die), who tags along for a bit.

Continue reading: The Man With The Golden Gun Review

The Wicker Man (1973) Review


Extraordinary
It's difficult to shake the disquieting climax of The Wicker Man, where pious Police Sgt. Howie (Edward Woodward) of the West Highland Police is confronted by the secrets kept within the isolated Scottish island of Summerisle. Being a decent Christian, he finds himself repulsed by their pagan rituals, open sexuality, and their unwavering devotion to the Old Gods. Much like the unwitting protagonists of Peter Weir's The Last Wave and Nicolas Roeg's Don't Look Now, Howie is facing off against powers much larger than himself (and anything that is dreamt of in his narrow theology).

Called upon to investigate the disappearance of a young schoolgirl named Rowan Morrison, Sgt. Howie finds stubborn, tight-lipped resistance from the local islanders, who carry about their business unmindful of his single-minded detective work. More often than not, they treat him with bemused detachment, laughing into their drinks or simply ignoring him altogether as he marches through the rustic schoolyards, dingy inns, and lush green hills. The locations, filmed in the highlands of Scotland, possess the eerie, musty, ever-haunted quality of an Old Country worn down by time. If there is a central character in The Wicker Man, it's the timeless elements of rock and water, moss and faded wood that comprise the town squares. Sgt. Howie, a man from the city, is clearly out of his depth.

Continue reading: The Wicker Man (1973) Review

The Man With The Golden Gun Review


Good
Christopher Lee always makes for an exceptional video. It's just too bad that it had to be in The Man with the Golden Gun, which ranks as one of James Bond's more absurd outings, involving a maniacal genius (Lee) who's assassinating folks and has Bond next on his list. Bond thus goes after this Scaramanga and uncovers the usual mega-weapon plot, this time featuring... wait for it... solar power. The theme song by Lulu (sample lyrics: "Love is required/Whenever he's hired/He comes just before the kiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiill") is original and a great example of high camp, much like the rest of the film. It's all gaudily good, right down to Hervé Villechaize(!), bikini-clad Britt Ekland, and the inimitable Clifton James as the vacationing Sheriff J.W. Pepper, who tags along for a bit.

Get Carter (1971) Review


Weak
Michael Caine plays Jack Carter, a hired gun who is out to avenge the death of his brother, Payback style, by beating up and killing off the guys who ordered his brother's killing. Filled with low-budget action and low-budget eroticism, Michael Caine unfortunately does not make much of an impression as a rough-and-tumble gangster. The picture has its moments, the most memorable of which is when Carter addresses an envelope of evidence to be mailed to "The Vice Squad." Not awful, but hardly a classic.

The Wicker Man Review


Extraordinary
It's difficult to shake the disquieting climax of The Wicker Man, where pious Police Sgt. Howie (Edward Woodward) of the West Highland Police is confronted by the secrets kept within the isolated Scottish island of Summerisle. Being a decent Christian, he finds himself repulsed by their pagan rituals, open sexuality, and their unwavering devotion to the Old Gods. Much like the unwitting protagonists of Peter Weir's The Last Wave and Nicolas Roeg's Don't Look Now, Howie is facing off against powers much larger than himself (and anything that is dreamt of in his narrow theology).

Called upon to investigate the disappearance of a young schoolgirl named Rowan Morrison, Sgt. Howie finds stubborn, tight-lipped resistance from the local islanders, who carry about their business unmindful of his single-minded detective work. More often than not, they treat him with bemused detachment, laughing into their drinks or simply ignoring him altogether as he marches through the rustic schoolyards, dingy inns, and lush green hills. The locations, filmed in the highlands of Scotland, possess the eerie, musty, ever-haunted quality of an Old Country worn down by time. If there is a central character in The Wicker Man, it's the timeless elements of rock and water, moss and faded wood that comprise the town squares. Sgt. Howie, a man from the city, is clearly out of his depth.

Continue reading: The Wicker Man Review

Britt Ekland

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