Brigitte Fossey

Brigitte Fossey

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Forbidden Games Trailer


Paulette is a young French girl who finds herself suddenly an orphan as the Germans take over the country, an airstrike killing her mother, father and beloved dog instantly. She is taken in by 11-year-old Michel Dolle and his family at their countryside home, and the two children soon find themselves embarking on a deep friendship. Michel helps Paulette bury her pet, though the latter is concerned about him being lonely and so they create their very own pet cemetary in a disturbing game, marking graves with crosses stolen from a nearby graveyard. It isn't long before it is discovered that a theft has taken place and the children must hide from the furious adults, when what started out as a game becomes ever more serious.

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Cinema Paradiso Trailer


Salvatore Di Vita is an Italian film director who has nursed a passion for film ever since he was a boy. As a youngster, he learned how to operate the projector at the movie house Cinema Paradiso from the paternal projectionist at the time, Alfredo. As time went on, he continued to spent every free moment there before meeting a girl, Elena, who he fell in love with. As the stars would have it, however, they were torn apart and Salvatore left his hometown to pursue his lifelong film ambition elsewhere. Having not had contact with Alfredo for several years, he hears news of his death and subsequently discovers a priceless gift left to him by Alfredo.

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Brigitte Fossey - Saturday 24th May 2008 at Cannes Film Festival Cannes, France

Brigitte Fossey
Brigitte Fossey

Forbidden Games Review


Excellent
Few scenes in motion picture history are quite as devastating as one at the beginning of Forbidden Games -- not when young Paulette's (Brigitte Fossey) parents are gunned down in the street by a Nazi pilot during a routine strafing run of the French countryside -- but rather a few minutes later. Paulette is riding on a cart to what we assume will be a new life, carrying her puppy in her arms. The old woman she's riding with looks down at the dog and tells her to get rid of it: Can't she tell the dog is dead? The old woman then picks up the pup and tosses it off the cart. As it plummets off of a bridge our hearts sink with it.

This singular scene is heart-crushing and yet it sums up the theme of René Clément's film perfectly: In war, you can't count on even the simplest joys in life. The world is full of horror, and war is hell in worse ways than you could imagine.

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Quintet Review


Bad
Wow. If you've ever wanted proof that goiod filmmakers are capable of turning out junk from time to time, look no further than Quintet, Robert Altman's existentialist story about a game that the remaining survivors of an unspecified holocaust are forced to play. It's like Chinese Checkers, sort of, only it features real people who lose their lives when their piece is eliminated.

Alas, if you're expecting a taut thriller of who'll-survive-the-madness, think again. This is messy, roundabout filmmaking, full of cryptic dialogue, pregnant pauses, and symbolic imagery, all of which end up signifying absolutely nothing.

Continue reading: Quintet Review

The Man Who Loved Women Review


Very Good
Here's a title that says it all. Bertrand Morane (Charles Denner, upon whom the film is partly/sort of based) loves women, and he'll jeopardize life and limb just to get a look at a woman's shins. This semi-classic François Truffaut film is little more than a series of "relationships" of Bertrand's, as seen in flashback from his funeral and through the lyricism of his autobiography. The funny thing isn't just how desperate Bertrand is -- he's also rather homely and seemingly irresistable. The ending is classic: From his death bed, he reaches for the nurse, only to fall to his ultimate demise. It's a quirky film about, well, not quite love, and not quite relationships, but what passed for them in 1970s France.

Continue reading: The Man Who Loved Women Review

Forbidden Games Review


Excellent
Few scenes in motion picture history are quite as devastating as one at the beginning of Forbidden Games -- not when young Paulette's (Brigitte Fossey) parents are gunned down in the street by a Nazi pilot during a routine strafing run of the French countryside -- but rather a few minutes later. Paulette is riding on a cart to what we assume will be a new life, carrying her puppy in her arms. The old woman she's riding with looks down at the dog and tells her to get rid of it: Can't she tell the dog is dead? The old woman then picks up the pup and tosses it off the cart. As it plummets off of a bridge our hearts sink with it.

This singular scene is heart-crushing and yet it sums up the theme of René Clément's film perfectly: In war, you can't count on even the simplest joys in life. The world is full of horror, and war is hell in worse ways than you could imagine.

Continue reading: Forbidden Games Review

Going Places (1974) Review


Excellent
Talk about aimless: These two hooligans (Gérard Depardieu and Patrick Dewaere) wander across the whole of France, simply looking for trouble. Namely that includes stealing cars and bedding women (usually in a three-way), then running away from whatever trouble they find themselves in -- whether they end up with a gruesome suicide on their hands or nurse from a lactating woman's breast on a train. And oh, it's a comedy. Quite funny, with a strangely perverted sensibility you aren't likely to find in many other films.

Continue reading: Going Places (1974) Review

Cinema Paradiso Review


Excellent
In one of the more puzzling DVD reissues ever comes Cinema Paradiso: The New Version (note it's not called "The Director's Cut" -- in fact this is really the "old version," as the cuts were made to make the film more palatable to U.S. audiences), which takes a sweet two hour production and turns it into an overwhelming three hour movie, which is far more paradiso than anyone really needs. Frankly, the cuts were understandable. And it won Best Foreign Film at the 1989 Oscars... what more do you want?

After all, what was wrong with the short version? Never saccharine, this love affair with the movies is a simple film. Poor, young boy befriends older (yet uneducated) projectionist in his small Sicilian town, learns the ropes, and grows older and wiser with his pal by his side. Eventually, there's romance (no, not between these two). There's war. There's departure. It's like three coming of age stories in one! They're all well produced, subtle, and tender. Unless you truly have no heart, you can't help but enjoy the film.

Continue reading: Cinema Paradiso Review

Brigitte Fossey

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Brigitte Fossey Movies

Forbidden Games Trailer

Forbidden Games Trailer

Paulette is a young French girl who finds herself suddenly an orphan as the Germans...

Cinema Paradiso Trailer

Cinema Paradiso Trailer

Salvatore Di Vita is an Italian film director who has nursed a passion for film...

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