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Video - Krysten Ritter And Margaret Keane On The Red Carpet At 'Big Eyes' Premiere - Part 1


'Big Eyes' star Krysten Ritter was among the star arrivals at the New York premiere of the Margaret Keane biopic held at the Museum of Modern Art. Keane herself was also at the event, looking rather shy as she posed meekly on the red carpet.

Continue: Video - Krysten Ritter And Margaret Keane On The Red Carpet At 'Big Eyes' Premiere - Part 1

Los Angeles Premiere Of Inglourious Basterds Premiere Held At The Grauman Chinese Theatre - Arrivals

Danny Elfman and Bridget Fonda - Danny Elfman and Bridget Fonda Hollywood, California - Los Angeles Premiere of Inglourious Basterds Premiere held at The Grauman Chinese Theatre - Arrivals Monday 10th August 2009

Danny Elfman and Bridget Fonda
Danny Elfman and Bridget Fonda

Film Independent Screening Of 'Taking Woodstock'

Bridget Fonda, Danny Elfman and Molly Elfman - Bridget Fonda, Danny Elfman, Molly Elfman Held at The Arclight Theatres Hollywood, California - Film Independent Screening Of 'Taking Woodstock' Tuesday 4th August 2009

Bridget Fonda, Danny Elfman and Molly Elfman
Bridget Fonda
Bridget Fonda and Molly Elfman
Bridget Fonda and Molly Elfman
Bridget Fonda
Bridget Fonda and Molly Elfman

The Break Up (1998) Review


Unbearable
Pedestrian thriller. Nonsensical and obvious why it went straight to cable, despite a decent cast of stars. What's with Weber's big moustache, anyway?

Frankenstein Unbound Review


Grim
John Hurt, Bridget Fonda, Raul Julia... Roger Corman??? This bizarre mashup of Frankenstein and Back to the Future is alternately interesting (with good production values, at least for some of the time) and completely bizarre. Hurt plays a futuristic scientist (dig his clothes... dig the kids' clothes!) who opens a portal in time and ends up in Victorian England, along with a real-life Dr. Frankenstein. The usual mayhem breaks loose as Frank marauds the countryside, before being zapped into an alternate reality. How's that? Don't ask. It involves lasers.

Bodies, Rest & Motion Review


OK
The early '90s were a bonanza for indie filmmakers. Digital video hadn't hit the scene yet, so producers had to raise a lot of money to buy film and equipment, and they often got access to indie-friendly celebs to help them with the picture. Bodies, Rest & Motion is a high-end indie archetype, and it's populated by nothing but stars. The story is also proto-'90s-indie: Four aimless slackers, each with a spurious agenda, couple, de-couple, and go nuts at random. The driving force, if you can call it that, is Tim Roth's sudden urge to leave Arizona for Butte, Montana ("The city of the future!"), which culminates in his girlfriend (Bridget Fonda) sleeping with the guy (Eric Stoltz) who comes to paint their house. Because in 1993, that's just what you did. It's overall well-acted but often too stupid to bear.

Monkeybone Review


Unbearable
Despite Fox's attempts to market this film on the coattails of director Henry Selick's success with Tim Burton vehicle The Nightmare Before Christmas, be thou not fooled. Monkeybone bears none of the charm or character of its predecessor. The story of a cartoonist (Brendan Fraser) who falls into a coma and enters a world where the star he created, Monkeybone (who is -- get this -- both a monkey and a metaphor for the cartoonist's own penis), this film lacks as much in the way of creative inspiration as it does in taste.

It's not that the unending stream of preschoolish fart and pecker jokes are offensive, they're just tiresome and invariably expected. And they persist, from the opening scene to the entirely unsurprising conclusion. Fortunately, though, the film has some subplots. Unfortunately, they're absolutely senseless.

Continue reading: Monkeybone Review

City Hall Review


OK
There's two things I dislike: politics and long, boring speeches. City Hall has plenty of both, and while Al Pacino is almost cool enough to make me think politics can be okay, it's got so many long speeches that I started looking for the remote control after the third or fourth one.

City Hall is a drama/thriller with most of the thrill sucked out of it. After a ridiculously convoluted opening, filled with the weak voice-over of the Deputy Mayor of New York City, Kevin Calhoun (John Cusack), we find ourselves embroiled in the world of Mayor John Pappas (Pacino). As the film opens, we find a cop and mobster killed in a shoot-out, taking with them the life of a six-year old boy.

Continue reading: City Hall Review

Lake Placid Review


Weak
It's crocodile season, opening the hunting period on an animal that has been woefully underused in the horror movie litany to date. But unlike most horror/thriller pics, this one features a script by David E. Kelley, best known as the creator of TV's Ally McBeal.

So there's some promise here. But does this monster movie rise above recent crap like Anaconda or Jaws 3-D? A little. It's better than Anaconda, anyway.

Continue reading: Lake Placid Review

Mr. Jealousy Review


Excellent
The long-overdue follow-up to Noah Baumbach's brilliant Kicking and Screaming, Mr. Jealousy is another look at a not-so-gracefully aging Generation X and its travails with relationships. Eric Stoltz stars as that typical Stoltz character with surprising effectiveness. A flawed but very entertaining character study.

Jackie Brown Review


Good
In many ways, this is the anti-Tarantino movie.

Jackie Brown is a potboiler, and a fairly good one at that, but those looking for slam-bang Tarantino action like that seen in Pulp Fiction and Reservoir Dogs will be disappointed, and sorely so.

Continue reading: Jackie Brown Review

Delivering Milo Review


Terrible
Albert Finney tries to coax an unborn child into popping out of Bridget Fonda. No, he's not a doctor -- he's a spirit sent to convince the little baby to be born! Given the singularly unappealing nature of Anton Yelchin, who plays the young Milo, a better plot might have been why Fonda would want this bratty little kid, instead. Contrived is a generous term for this one. Fairly banal.

Singles Review


Good
Crowe's guilty pleasure of a confection outlines the struggles of Gen-X singles in the 1990s, but doesn't portray a wholly realistic version of them. Instead, Singles survives on its charming humor and inadvertant status as the de facto chronicle of the Seattle grunge scene. Watch for endless cameos and stars who would later go on to much higher heights.

The Break Up Review


Unbearable
Pedestrian thriller. Nonsensical and obvious why it went straight to cable, despite a decent cast of stars. What's with Weber's big moustache, anyway?

The Godfather: Part III Review


OK
Why make another Godfather? While he gives it the old college try, Francis Ford Coppola fails to answer the question in The Godfather Part III, which picks up the saga of the Corleones decades later -- which finds Michael (Al Pacino) still unable to go legit. By 1990, he's near death (having heart attacks and whatnot), and he figures the Catholic Church is his best route to legitimacy. And wouldn't you know it, they're corrupt too. Well, you know, just when he thought he was out, they pull him back in...

While the film is well-acted (with the surprising exception of Diane Keaton reprising a role that wasn't all that interesting to begin with), masterfully lighted, and gorgeously photographed -- most notably the various shootout scenes -- it ultimately treads over old ground: material from the first two movies as well as repeating itself. This is most telling in the aforementioned shootouts -- the Atlantic City shoot-'em-up (courtesy of a helicopter outside) is horrifyingly grotesque (in a good way), but it seems more fitting for the histrionics of Scarface than the subtle and jaw-dropping one-two punch of Michael Corleone's assassination work at Louis' Italian-American Restaurant in The Godfather. Ultimately, the movie is simply one assassination after another -- and in Coppola's commentary track, he acknowledges this, placing much of the blame at the foot of the studio. It's also a testament to the amount of power that Coppola lost in the intervening decades -- again, something he acknowledges in the commentary.

Continue reading: The Godfather: Part III Review

Bridget Fonda

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Bridget Fonda

Date of birth

27th January, 1964

Occupation

Actor

Sex

Female

Height

1.68


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