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In The Heart Of The Sea Review

Excellent

With a huge budget and a relatively small story, this is an intriguingly offbeat blockbuster that might struggle to find an audience. Basically, it's aimed at fans of more thoughtful, personal stories of tenacity and survival, but it's shot with a massive special effects budget that sometimes seems to swamp the drama. Still, it's involving and moving. And it's also fascinatingly based on the true events that inspired Moby Dick.

The story is framed in 1850 as novelist Herman Melville (Ben Whishaw) visits an ageing sailor named Tom (Brendan Gleeson) to quiz him about a momentous event in his past that he has never spoken of. Flash back to 1820 Nantucket, and Tom (Tom Holland) is a rookie crew member on the whaling ship Essex, working under the posh, privileged Captain George (Benjamin Walker) and his able but low-class first mate Owen (Chris Hemsworth). As these these two leaders clash against each other, the ship sails off for what will be a very long journey. Eventually they head into the Pacific in search of a mythical pod of whales. But when they find it, they run afoul of a gigantic white whale that takes their arrival personally, sinking their ship and pursuing the survivors in their lifeboats.

All of this is staged as an epic battle between humanity and nature, with layers of interest in the way these men strain to survive against unimaginable odds. It's a riveting story, beautifully shot and rendered with immersive effects. And the cast members create complex characters who are profoundly changed by their experience. Not only is there mammoth action, but there's plenty of barbed interaction and even some strongly emotional moments that bring the themes home to a modern audience. Sometimes this aspect feels a bit corny, as clearly whalers at the time wouldn't feel remorse about killing one of these majestic creatures. But we would.

Continue reading: In The Heart Of The Sea Review

Love The Coopers (aka Christmas With The Coopers) Review

Good

This may look like it's going to be a zany Christmas romp, but it's really a warm exploration of family connections, essentially an American take on Love Actually's multi-strand comedy-drama. At least it has an unusually strong cast and moments of hilarity scattered throughout the story. And while it's never very deep, the themes are strongly resonant.

The Cooper family is gathering for what Charlotte (Diane Keaton) hopes will be one last perfect Christmas together. She knows that her 40-year marriage to Sam (John Goodman) is on the brink, but is ignoring that to plan a massive dinner. Their son Hank (Ed Helms) is stinging from divorce and unemployment, while daughter Eleanor (Olivia Wilde) has picked up a hunky soldier (Jake Lacy) in the airport and asks him to pose as her boyfriend so her family will stop asking about her love life. Meanwhile, Charlotte's father Bucky (Alan Arkin) is trying to cheer up his favourite waitress (Amanda Seyfried), and Charlotte's sister Emma (Marisa Tomei) is delayed when a cop (Anthony Mackie) arrests her for shoplifting.

Narrated with wry joviality by Steve Martin, the interwoven stories are fairly simplistic, but each touches a raw nerve. And the above-average cast brings out the underlying themes without overplaying their scenes. Keaton and Goodman add subtle shades to the slightly undemanding central roles, while Arkin finds a couple of new textures to his usual twinkly grandad persona. Helms and Wilde strike the right balance in their intriguingly unlikeable roles, while Tomei gets the most complex character as a woman who feels like she's merely watched her life drift along. By contrast, the outsiders played by Seyfried, Lacy and Mackie are much less defined, but each actor brings just enough magnetic energy. The most wasted performer is June Squibb, as a ditzy old aunt who's little more than the requisite gross-out relative.

Continue reading: Love The Coopers (aka Christmas With The Coopers) Review

LACMA Art + Film Gala 2015

Brian Grazer , Veronica Smiley - LACMA Art + Film Gala 2015 - Arrivals - Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 8th November 2015

Brian Grazer and Veronica Smiley

Ben Stiller, Jennifer Tilly, Star Jones At Hamilton

Christopher Jackson, Brian Grazer , Lin-Manuel Miranda - Backstage visit at the Broadway musical Hamilton at the Richard Rodgers Theatre. at Richard Rodgers Theatre, - New York City, New York, United States - Friday 11th September 2015

Christopher Jackson, Brian Grazer and Lin-manuel Miranda
Daveed Diggs and Brian Grazer
Brian Grazer
Christopher Jackson, Brian Grazer, Lin-manuel Miranda and Dana Walden

Brian Grazer Goes Shopping In Beverly Hills

Brian Grazer - Film producer Brian Grazer goes shopping in Beverly Hills - Los Angeles, California, United States - Wednesday 9th September 2015

Brian Grazer
Brian Grazer
Brian Grazer
Brian Grazer
Brian Grazer

Brian Grazer Running Errands In Beverly Hills

Brian Grazer - Movie producer Brian Grazer talking on his cellphone while running errands in Beverly Hills. He co-founded Imagine Entertainment in 1986, with Ron Howard. The films they produced have grossed over $13 billion - Los Angeles, California, United States - Thursday 13th August 2015

Brian Grazer
Brian Grazer
Brian Grazer
Brian Grazer
Brian Grazer
Brian Grazer

FOX All-Star Party

Brian Grazer - 2015 Television Critics Association Summer Press Tour - FOX All-Star Party at SOHO HOUSE - West Hollywood, California, United States - Thursday 6th August 2015

Brian Grazer
Brian Grazer
Brian Grazer
Brian Grazer

Get On Up Review


Good

With an appropriately jarring sense of energy, this James Brown biopic acutely captures the Godfather of Soul's iconic musical talents, although the fragmented script undermines any emotional kick in his story. The film also struggles to build up momentum, because it continually leaps between various chapters in Brown's life. Which means that it never quite connects these disparate episodes into one coherent narrative. Even so, Chadwick Boseman delivers an electrically charged central performance.

Boseman plays James from the time he was 16, thrown into prison for stealing a suit in 1949, until his comeback in the 1990s. Raised in a brothel run by his Aunt Honey (Octavia Spencer) after his parents (Viola Davis and Lennie James) abandoned him, James is in prison when he meets visiting gospel singer Bobby Byrd (Nelsan Ellis), who takes him in on his release. Together they form The Famous Flames, gaining small-time success as James catches the eye of a manager (Dan Aykroyd), a record executive (Fred Melamed) and the public. A string of major hits followed in the 1950s and 60s, then James went solo in the 70s before the usual issues of fame caught up with him: money, drugs and guns. But he returned to the stage in the 1990s.

The film completely skips over his Hollywood years in the 80s, which wouldn't be a problem if the decade was so notably missing from the film. As the story skips back and forth through the years, the audience is forced to make sense of the disparate scenes, filling in several holes along the way. Aside from one rather surreal scene in a Southern Gospel church, there's never much of a sense of how Brown found his voice or developed his inimitable style. It also never quite captures his impact on the music industry as a whole.

Continue reading: Get On Up Review

Get On Up - Memories Of James Brown Featurette


The cast and crew of forthcoming James Brown biopic 'Get On Up' talk about the legacy of the pioneering entertainer and the impact he had following his spectacular live show at the Apollo Theater in Harlem which was subsequently transposed to his 1963 live album entitled 'Live At The Apollo'.

Continue: Get On Up - Memories Of James Brown Featurette

Video - 'Get On Up' Star Tika Sumpter Looking Glamorous At The NY Premiere - Part 4


The cast and crew were spotted among the many arrivals on the red carpet at the New York premiere for James Brown biopic 'Get On Up'; among them included stars Tika Sumpter and Brandon Mychal Smith, co-screenwriter John-Henry Butterworth, co-producers Erica Huggins and Brian Grazer and director Tate Taylor.

Continue: Video - 'Get On Up' Star Tika Sumpter Looking Glamorous At The NY Premiere - Part 4

Video - Chadwick Boseman Makes His Entrance At The 'Get On Up' NY Premiere - Part 5


The stars of James Brown biopic 'Get On Up' including leading man Chadwick Boseman arrive for the New York premiere of the movie which was held at the city's Apollo Theater. The movie is scheduled to hit cinemas in September 2014.

Continue: Video - Chadwick Boseman Makes His Entrance At The 'Get On Up' NY Premiere - Part 5

Rush Review


Excellent

Exhilarating racing action punctuates this true story, which sharply traces the rivalry between two Formula One champs. It's superbly well-shot and edited, with engaging performances from the entire cast. And with only one moment of calculated sentimentality, it's director Ron Howard's most honest movie in years.

The story begins in the early 1970s, when two rising-star F1 drivers clash over their very different styles. Britain's James Hunt (Hemsworth) is a swaggering womaniser, revelling in the rock-star lifestyle. By contrast, Austria's Niki Lauda (Bruhl) is a fiercely detailed technician who loves pushing barriers. They clearly see things they like in each other, so their different approaches on the track develop into a competitive relationship that spurs them to the front of the pack. Over the years, both meet their wives (Wilde and Lara, respectively) and move from team to team as they rise to the top of their sport. And their rivalry comes to a head at the 1976 German Grand Prix when world champion Lauda is involved in a horrific, fiery accident.

Morgan's script is essentially two biopics cleverly woven together to let us see the push and pull between these two iconic figures. Unexpectedly, Bruhl's Lauda emerges as the stronger character, with his grounded approach and sardonic wit allowing Bruhl to play effectively with submerged emotions. By contrast, Hemsworth's Hunt is little more than a gifted good-time boy who isn't worried about his lack of substance. It's a likeable, loose performance (we barely notice the wobbly British accent). Opposite them Lara and Wilde provide solid, subtle support, as do the fine actors who fill out the pit crews.

Continue reading: Rush Review

The Lone Ranger Bombs At Cinemas, But How Does It Compare To The Worst Box Office Bombs?


Johnny Depp Armie Hammer Ron Howard Brian Grazer Eddie Murphy Matthew Mcconaughey Steve Zahn Penelope Cruz

Jerry Bruckheimer and Johnny Depp back together in another swashbuckling adventure, what could possibly go wrong? Unfortunately for Disney, a lot did go wrong with The Lone Ranger; no one was interested in a big screen version of a 1930s radio series. Johnny Depp is starting to lose his box office appeal and, ultimately, it was terrible. But hey, at least there's worse film right?

Lone Ranger
The Lone Ranger probably wont make it into the top five

The film isn't out of cinemas yet, so we can't really say how much it will lose (who knows, it might have the best week three in cinema history), but we can assume it will sit nicely next to Disney's last big box office flop: 2012's John Carter. Speaking of John Carter, when it comes to the top box office flops, the confused martian adventure doesn't even break into the top ten. Here's the five worst performing films of all time.

Continue reading: The Lone Ranger Bombs At Cinemas, But How Does It Compare To The Worst Box Office Bombs?

J. Edgar Review


Good
Exquisitely designed and directed, with finely tuned performances that shine even through some heavy make-up, this true story never quite succeeds in conveying its central relationship. Sure, repression is the point, but passion would have made the film heartbreaking rather than just sad.

John Edgar Hoover (DiCaprio) was only 29 when he became director of the Bureau of Investigation (later the FBI), and he ruled supreme until his death in 1972, holding eight US presidents in the palm of his hand with his notorious files of personal secrets. But he also had loyal friends, including his secretary Helen (Watts) and his right-hand man Clyde (Hammer). As a young man, his mother (Dench) instilled in him a hatred of liberalism and homosexuality, so his enemies included Martin Luther King, Robert Kennedy (Donovan) and himself.

Continue reading: J. Edgar Review

Video - Brian Grazer Jaywalks To His Car


Producer Brian Grazer (24; Arrested Development; Friends With Benefits) leaves a medical building in Beverly Hills. The photographers accidentally call him Jimmy; Brian jokes that they were confusing him with someone else. He then quips that he's going to jaywalk across the busy road to his car, which he does.

Brian is well known as the producer of the cult sitcom Arrested Development. It was recently announced that there was to be a film adaptation of the show; the main cast all signed up to reprise their roles
Brian Grazer

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