Brian Geraghty

Brian Geraghty

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Private event held to celebrate the second season of 'Ray Donovan'

Brian Geraghty - Showtime and Time Warner Cable's private event held to celebrate the second season of 'Ray Donovan' - Arrivals - Malibu, California, United States - Wednesday 9th July 2014

Dancing for NED for Cedars-Sinai Womens Cancer Program

Brian Geraghty - Celebrities attend Dancing for NED, a dance party to raise funds for the Cedars-Sinai Women's Cancer Program at UNICI CASA in Culver City - Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 3rd May 2014

Brian Geraghty
Brian Geraghty
Brian Geraghty
Brian Geraghty

2014 Tribeca Film Festival

Brian Geraghty, Isabelle McNally, Adam Rapp, Ivan Martin, Marisa Tomei, Sam Rockwell and Michael Godere - 2014 Tribeca Film Festival - "Loitering With Intent" Premiere -Red Carpet Arrivals - Manhattan, New York, United States - Saturday 19th April 2014

Brian Geraghty
Brian Geraghty

'Loitering With Intent' premiere at the Tribeca Film Festival - Arrivals

Brian Geraghty - 'Loitering With Intent' premiere at the Tribeca Film Festival - Arrivals - New York, New York, United States - Friday 18th April 2014

Brian Geraghty
Brian Geraghty
Brian Geraghty
Brian Geraghty
Brian Geraghty

Zooey Deschanel And Tommy Hilfiger Debut New Capsule Collection

Brian Geraghty - Celebrities attend the Zooey Deschanel for Tommy Hilfiger Collection launch event at The London Hotel. - Los Angeles, California, United States - Wednesday 9th April 2014

Brian Geraghty
Brian Geraghty

Flight Review


OK

With another deeply committed performance, Washington brings badly needed complexity to what is otherwise a contrived, overstated drama about addiction. It helps that the film is directed by Zemeckis as a kind of companion piece to his last live-action movie, 2000's Cast Away, another film about a man whose life is dramatically changed by a plane crash. Although here he's lost in a wilderness of substance abuse.

Washington plays Whip, a veteran commercial pilot who fills his days with women, alcohol and drugs. Even when he's flying a plane full of passengers. On a routine flight from Orlando to Atlanta, a catastrophic malfunction sends his airliner hurtling toward the ground, prompting an outrageously inventive reaction that saves 96 of the 102 lives on board. Then the investigators discover that he had both alcohol and cocaine in his system at the time. His union rep (Greenwood) hires a high-powered lawyer (Cheadle) to represent him, but Whip doesn't even try to straighten up until he meets young junkie Nicole (Reilly), who's serious about cleaning up her life.

The main problem here is that Gatins' script completely misses the point of his own story, never remotely touching on the central theme of a flawed hero who has no real moral compass. So drugs are the villain; it has nothing to do with Whip's personal failings. Instead, the script just uses a variety of contrived characters to confront him with his drug problems until he finally cracks under all this pressure. Fortunately, Washington is excellent as the high-functioning addict, and the supporting cast is solid in providing whatever element Gatins needs at the moment: Cheadle's straight-arrow efficiency, Reilly's hopeful anguish and Greenwood's steadfast friendship, plus scene-stealer Goodman as Whip's hilariously honest dealer-buddy and Leo as a ruthlessly tenacious investigator.

Continue reading: Flight Review

Flight Trailer


When airplane pilot Whit makes an extraordinary landing following an engine failure which saves the lives of his passengers, he becomes a national hero mobbed by the press. It is only when he is introduced to an attorney that he discovers that he the one person he didn't manage to save was himself. The lawyer informs him that a blood test taken on the night of the crash revealed alcohol in system; an offence which is punishable by life imprisonment. An investigation follows and Whit reveals that he did drink the night before he was due for the flight, however, an experiment involving ten pilots in aircraft simulators with recreated circumstances from the crash revealed that, were any other pilot to land the plane in the way that Whit did, they would've killed every soul on board. Was Whit's risky landing a result of drunken recklessness, or was his decision made by the years of experience and general confidence in his area of expertise? This is the judgement the jury must make.

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Easier With Practice Review


Good
Solid twists in the tale add depth to this quirky American rom-com, which plays out with a breezily casual tone while building a surprising amount of tension along the way. It's also surprisingly endearing and funny.

Sean (O'Neill) is helping his nerdy brother Davy (Geraghty) sell his collection of short stories through a series of bookshop readings. More importantly, Sean hopes to help Davy get over a breakup with his ex-girlfriend (Moreau). Yet despite having a girlfriend (Brox) back home, it's Sean who keeps hooking up with women along the way, including one (Gavigan) who quite likes Davy. Then Davy gets an anonymous call from the sexy Nicole (Aselton), and without ever meeting they develop an explicit relationship. Or maybe it's just phone sex.

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The Hurt Locker Review


Excellent
It's intriguing to watch a battlefield movie that manages to be gritty and harrowing as well as sensitive and moving, but that's what Bigelow has done.

This is a film that often makes us flinch from the screen, mainly because of a superbly layered performance by Renner.

In war-torn Baghdad, the American bomb disposal team uses dry humour to cope with their job. But the new senior officer, James (Renner), is rather enigmatic and strange. His teammates Sanborn and Eldridge (Mackie and Geraghty) find his maverick attitude difficult, leading to tense exchanges in extreme situations.

Continue reading: The Hurt Locker Review

I Know Who Killed Me Review


Grim
I know what you're thinking, and the answer is yes, I Know You Killed Me has a titular line of dialogue. In the fine tradition of exploitation movies, it has to -- the lead character has to turn to someone and say that enticingly ridiculous statement. In that sense, this film delivers.

The aforementioned tradition, though, doesn't say anything about that titular line actually making any sense. I wouldn't want to give away plot details to I Know Who Killed Me that might spoil any plans to Netflix and heckle it with friends (or to stumble across it on cable and heckle it alone), but suffice it to say that this line is delivered with utter seriousness by someone who is in no way dead, even by the movie's own convoluted stretches of imagination (granted, a limited one in this case).

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Conversations With Other Women Review


Excellent
Try to watch director Hans Canosa's Conversations with Other Women twice and in quick succession. The memories that haunt the film's reunited lovers subtly inform every look, line, and gesture between them. For that reason, the film not only stands up to, it demands subsequent viewings if one wants to fully appreciate its layers of double meanings and shaded subtext.

What immediately sets Conversations apart is how, over its 85 minutes, it makes such fun and inventive use of the split-screen technique. The technique's most obvious function is to convey how the story's man and woman (Aaron Eckhart and Helena Bonham Carter), no matter their passion for each other, inhabit disparate and irreconcilable worlds. But it goes brilliantly beyond that, using split-screen also for flashbacks, triggered by memory, in which younger versions of the characters (Erik Eidem and Nora Zehetner), play out the halcyon days of their long-ago romance. What's more, the details of these flashbacks warp and alter, depending on who's doing the remembering. In an intriguing twist, the split-screen projects not only alternate versions of the past, but of the present too -- showing variations on small but important moments either as a character perceives they happened or he/she wishes they had. It's a sensationally expressive use of a tired cinematic device, now revitalized and itself revitalizing a tired genre.

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Bobby Review


Terrible
Filmmakers go overboard all the time, but none more than Oliver Stone. When Stone released JFK in 1991, it was obvious that he was pulling from a biased idealism, but he wasn't necessarily fibbing either. The cumulative effect of Stone's film was investigative fervor; even if you didn't believe the bulk of what was being given, you had to be shocked by a few of his points. The film was about looking back, but it was also about the hushed panic of the Kennedy assassination and the rest of the '60s. So, maybe going overboard was important to what Stone was after.

You won't find any sort of rabblerousing or sense of time in Emilio Estevez's Bobby, his account of the people that were in attendance when Robert F. Kennedy was shot and killed in Los Angeles' Ambassador Hotel. Estevez tosses together close to two dozen major characters and storylines along with footage of RFK campaigning against racism, America's poverty, and unlawful McCarthy tactics. The stories run the gamut from a young couple (Elijah Wood and Lindsay Lohan) getting hitched to keep the groom out of the war to an alcoholic diva (Demi Moore) and her forgotten husband (Estevez himself) to a philandering hotel manager (William H. Macy) who must keep his affair with a switchboard operator (Heather Graham) from his wife (Sharon Stone) and from an infuriated ex-employee (Christian Slater). There's also a pack of poll campaigners (Nick Cannon, Joshua Jackson, Shia Labeouf, and Brian Geraghty) who must deal with an acid freak out facilitated by a hippie (Ashton Kutcher), a pushy Czech journalist (Svetlana Metkina), and a flirty waitress at the hotel restaurant (Mary Elizabeth Winstead). Sounds like the makings of an ensemble comedy, no?

Continue reading: Bobby Review

Conversations With Other Women Review


Excellent
Try to watch director Hans Canosa's Conversations with Other Women twice and in quick succession. The memories that haunt the film's reunited lovers subtly inform every look, line, and gesture between them. For that reason, the film not only stands up to, it demands subsequent viewings if one wants to fully appreciate its layers of double meanings and shaded subtext. What immediately sets Conversations apart is how, over its 85 minutes, it makes such fun and inventive use of the split-screen technique. The technique's most obvious function is to convey how the story's man and woman (Aaron Eckhart and Helena Bonham Carter), no matter their passion for each other, inhabit disparate and irreconcilable worlds. But it goes brilliantly beyond that, using split-screen also for flashbacks, triggered by memory, in which younger versions of the characters (Erik Eidem and Nora Zehetner), play out the halcyon days of their long-ago romance. What's more, the details of these flashbacks warp and alter, depending on who's doing the remembering. In an intriguing twist, the split-screen projects not only alternate versions of the past, but of the present too -- showing variations on small but important moments either as a character perceives they happened or he/she wishes they had. It's a sensationally expressive use of a tired cinematic device, now revitalized and itself revitalizing a tired genre.Conversations opens as a wedding reception at a posh New York City hotel winds down. A man and woman -- each alone, bored, slightly drunk -- strike up a conversation. Their manner is flirtatious, but the back-and-forth is barbed with sarcastic half-truths, and, at least from the woman's side, with the thorns of years-old grievances. The woman, we learn, was one of the bridesmaids. She's traveled here from London where she has a well-to-do cardiologist husband and three children waiting for her. The man has a 22-year-old girlfriend back at home, but he isn't sweating it; we get the sense he's had many a 22-year-old girlfriend waiting on him at one time or another. Rather, he's more taken with the woman, who's clearly more than a passing fancy.The two don't have much time; the woman's flight leaves at dawn. They repair to her hotel room where their bittersweet, often humorous verbal dance continues with a break for the inevitable catch-up sex. On the page, this all sounds corny. But, as remembrances layer one upon the other, this relationship takes on the darkness and depth of an epic love. Screenwriter Gabrielle Zavin freshens up stale love story conventions, and does so the right way: By creating distinct, well rounded characters. We piece together, bit by bit, the circumstances of the woman fleeing their troubled affair for safe harbor in London, and what perhaps followed in the years following their breakup. At times, Zavin's scenes can feel stagy and amateurish, forcing her characters from one beat to another as each seeks to fill the decade-plus gap since they were last together.Luckily, she's got Canosa's playful direction and two exceedingly likeable performers in Eckhart and Bonham Carter to help smooth out the crimps in her script. Eckhart works away his characters' mischievous charm till, tentatively, the man's emotional wounds begin to bare and bleed. To my mind, this is also the worthiest part Bonham Carter's had since 1997's The Wings of the Dove, and here she reminds us what an engaging dramatic presence she can be, and that she holds her own with today's best screen actors.Like Richard Linklater's Before Sunset and André Téchiné's Changing Times, Conversations is actually interested in the joys and pains of human relationships. Each of these films is about sensitive, intelligent adults negotiating with that least selfish of human ideals: Eternal Love. In every significant way, these films are rare gems in an age of impersonal, cookie-cutter filmmaking, a soothing salve for blockbuster-bruised cinemagoers starved, like Conversations' own lovers, for something real and substantial.Why would you talk to another woman anyway?

When a Stranger Calls (2006) Review


Weak
"The call is coming from inside the house!!!!"

It's a line that's frightening regardless of whether you know its coming or not. The quintessential urban legend, the tale of the babysitter harassed by the maniacal killer who, yes, is calling and taunting from inside the house, strikes fear into the heart of every teenager. It's scary because it gets right at the heart, the very marrow, of our fear of the unknown. I'm sure cavemen had similar tales to frighten the unwary, the naïve. "The growling was coming from inside the cave!!!!"

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Brian Geraghty

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