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New Kurt Cobain Album Set For Release This Summer, Says 'Montage Of Heck' Director


Kurt Cobain Nirvana Frances Bean Cobain Brett Morgen

A new album from late Nirvana frontman Kurt Cobain is coming this summer, according to Montage of Heck director Brett Morgen. Morgen, who was given unprecedented access to Cobain’s archives while making the documentary, has said he found over 200 hours of never heard before material and rare music in the singer’s collection.

Brett MorgenCobain: Montage of Heck director Brett Morgen.

“We’re going to be putting out an amazing album this summer that I think will answer that question,” Brett Morgen told Bedford + Bowery when asked if he found any new material in Cobain’s archives.

Continue reading: New Kurt Cobain Album Set For Release This Summer, Says 'Montage Of Heck' Director

HBO "Kurt Cobain: Montage Of Heck" Los Angeles Premiere

Frances Bean Cobain, Courtney Love and Brett Morgen - A variety of stars turned out in numbers to attend the LA premiere of HBO's documentary "Kurt Cobain: Montage Of Heck" which was held at the Egyptian Theatre in Hollywood, California, United States - Wednesday 22nd April 2015

Frances Bean Cobain, Courtney Love and Brett Morgen
Frances Bean Cobain, Courtney Love and Brett Morgen
Frances Bean Cobain and Courtney Love
Frances Bean Cobain and Courtney Love
Frances Bean Cobain and Courtney Love

Cobain: Montage of Heck - Our Name Is Nirvana Trailer


In a new clip from the forthcoming official Kurt Cobain documentary, we discover the birth of grunge pioneers Nirvana; featuring a rare early performance clip, a set of black and white animated sketches seemingly entitled 'The Reaganites' and various notepad scribbles featuring words and phrases that were ultimately replaced by the band name 'Nirvana', including The Mandibles, Window Pain, Seringe, Godchild and Novacain. The film uses art and previously unseen footage and photos to document the rise to fame of Kurt Cobain, his struggles with addiction and his tragic suicide at the age of just 27.

Continue: Cobain: Montage of Heck - Our Name Is Nirvana Trailer

'Cobain: Montage Of Heck' Sees Kurt Cobain's Happier Moments [Trailer + Pictures]


Kurt Cobain Brett Morgen Frances Bean Cobain Nirvana Courtney Love

Some of Kurt Cobain's happiest moments are depicted in the new trailer for the first authorised documentary of his life 'Cobain: Montage Of Heck'; a collection of home movies and never before seen footage directed by Brett Morgen and executively produced by Frances Bean.

Kurt Cobain 1
Kurt Cobain's life story comes to life in 'Montage of Heck'

While his early life saw the late Kurt Cobain as a happy-go-lucky child with a profound creative talent, the years following his parents' divorce were nothing short of tempestuous for the young musician. Though still hungry for music, songwriting and drawing, Cobain developed struggles with anger and rejection throughout his teenage years, setting him up for a success that would ultimately bring about his downfall. And while it seemed his astonishing success with grunge pioneers Nirvana in the 90s was a high point in his life, not to mention his relationship with Courtney Love and the birth of their daughter Frances, it only led to a tragic end.

Continue reading: 'Cobain: Montage Of Heck' Sees Kurt Cobain's Happier Moments [Trailer + Pictures]

Cobain: Montage Of Heck Trailer


Kurt Cobain was trapped in a troubled homelife as a child with his parents having divorced, and it wasn't long before he embarked on a tragic path of self-destruction. Deliberately rebellious as a teenager with a lot of pent up anger and frustration, Cobain's creative talents were obvious to those who knew him as he'd constantly be working on songwriting or artwork. The fame of his grunge pioneer band Nirvana brought a lot of dangerous issues including drug use, and it took its toll on his relationship with Courtney Love, with whom he bore a child. It seemed he was happy to be building a family of his own, but his sudden suicide at the age of 27 was not unforeseen for a musician so determined to bring peace to his own mind.

Continue: Cobain: Montage Of Heck Trailer

First Look At Kurt Cobain Documentary 'Cobain: Montage of Heck' [Picture]


Kurt Cobain Nirvana Dave Grohl Courtney Love Frances Bean Cobain Brett Morgen

The first image from the forthcoming official Kurt Cobain documentary 'Cobain: Montage of Heck' has finally been released, giving us a glimpse into one of the most highly anticipated music documentaries of late.

Cobain: Montage Of Heck
First picture from 'Cobain: Montage of Heck'

The movie has been executively produced by the Nirvana frontman's 22-year-old daughter Frances Bean and marks the very first authorized documentary on the grunge legend, who tragically took his own life at the peak of Nirvana fame in 1994. The first image is a haunting painting of the singer walking away from a blue, wooden panelled house surrounded by trees, as the dull, dark grey sky bears down on him.

Continue reading: First Look At Kurt Cobain Documentary 'Cobain: Montage of Heck' [Picture]

Book To Accompany Documentary Film About Kurt Cobain


Kurt Cobain Brett Morgen Nirvana

The upcoming documentary about Nirvana frontman Kurt Cobain on HBO is to be accompanied by book, which will explore in greater detail what the film covers.

Kurt Cobain
'Montage of Heck', a documentary about Nirvana frontman Kurt Cobain, will be released in May

Both the film and book will be entitled ‘Montage of Heck’, a name taken from a mixtape that Cobain made and which was shared widely online last year. The tracklisting features clips from The Beatles, The Monkees, Iron Maiden, Black Sabbath, The Jackson Five and many more, which gave an insight into the widely divergent influences that made up Cobain’s songwriting.

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Crossfire Hurricane Review


OK

Watching the Rolling Stones' home movies while they reminisce on the soundtrack is thoroughly entertaining, although this documentary is such an inside job that it doesn't really tell us anything we don't already know. Indeed, the Rolling Stones commissioned this film for their 50th anniversary, and while it doesn't shy away from showing their heyday of sex, drugs and rock-n-roll, it never gets into their personal lives at all. And it only covers the first half of their half-century.

As well-educated blues musicians on the London club scene, the Stones enjoyed reasonable success, but it wasn't until they were dubbed the "anti-Beatles" and set about to play on their anarchic images that they rocketed to global stardom, setting teen girls' hearts (and bladders) aflutter across Britain and America. But their bad-boy behaviour also got them into a lot of trouble. Guitarist Brian Jones dropped out of the band in 1969 (and drowned less than a month later), while his replacement Mick Taylor quit in 1974 due to drugs, replaced by Ronnie Wood. But the partying hit a low point with Keith Richards' arrest for heroin in 1977, after which they cleaned up their act. And their early 1980s tour was their biggest ever.

Oddly, the documentary suddenly ends here, making us wonder if this is just part 1. Although their successes since then have been a bit more sporadic, they would certainly provide some telling backstage moments. By contrast, much of the footage here (mainly in grainy black and white shot on Mick Jagger's own home movie camera) centres on the band goofing around in their down moments. It's edited in with lots of concert footage, so the soundtrack is like an early greatest hits collection. And there are also lively TV interviews done through the years. For narration, the filmmakers use audio recordings done specifically for this movie, with telling memories and witty commentary.

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56th BFI London Film Festival: 'Rolling Stones - Crossfire Hurricanes', gala screening held at the Odeon Leicester Square - Arrivals.

Brett Morgen - Brett Morgen and guest Thursday 18th October 2012 56th BFI London Film Festival: 'Rolling Stones - Crossfire Hurricanes', gala screening held at the Odeon Leicester Square - Arrivals.

Brett Morgen

56th BFI London Film Festival: 'Rolling Stones - Crossfire Hurricanes', gala screening held at the Odeon Leicester Square - Arrivals.

Brett Morgen Thursday 18th October 2012 56th BFI London Film Festival: 'Rolling Stones - Crossfire Hurricanes', gala screening held at the Odeon Leicester Square - Arrivals.

Brett Morgen
Brett Morgen

Chicago 10 Review


Weak
The story of the 1968 Democratic Convention riots and the trial that followed would seem to have it all, with no need for sexing up. There were riots in the streets (broadcast live on TV, even), youthful heroes with a zest for the theatrical, scowling villains with little regard for decency, and the sense that the future of America was hanging in the balance. That wasn't enough, though, for director Brett Morgen (The Kid Stays in the Picture), who said that with Chicago 10 he wanted to make a film that "resonates with kids today" by being done "in a language they understand... without talking heads and a narrator and all those trappings." Thus: Animation and Rage Against the Machine on the soundtrack. The first sign, of course, that somebody will be wholly unable to effectively communicate with kids today is when they refer to them as "kids today."

Morgen's conceit with Chicago 10 -- mixing archival footage of the riot and its aftermath with animated recreations of the trial -- is not the film's problem. In fact, by breaking away from the well-worn documentarian's path of narration and flashback, Morgen does opens interesting doors for other filmmakers to follow. But the filmmakers (Morgen's main backer was Vanity Fair editor and occasional political dilettante Graydon Carter) have such a lack of faith in their own subject's inherent power that it all ends up more a gimmick than a bold new direction in non-fiction filmmaking. Medium Cool 2008 it's not.

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The Kid Stays in the Picture Review


Essential
I read Robert Evans' 1994 autobiography, The Kid Stays in the Picture, years ago and thought that it was worthy of the bargain bin at Waldenbooks--which is exactly where I found it. Evans' work was an overlong and self-indulgent tale that didn't hook me the way great Hollywood tales of excess like Hit and Run or Easy Riders, Raging Bulls, which I read later on, did.

After watching Brett Morgen and Nanette Burstein's brilliant documentary, adapted from Evans' book, I may soon have to reread my copy. The duo does two things that Evans never really embraced in his literary effort: They capture the tornado of fame, women, and power that Evans lived in, and, with their subject's help, give it a well-worn dignity and honesty that you rarely see in celebrity biographies.

Continue reading: The Kid Stays in the Picture Review

Brett Morgen

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