Brendan Gleeson Page 4

Brendan Gleeson

Brendan Gleeson Quick Links

News Pictures Video Film Quotes RSS

Michael Fassbender's Been Waiting Since He Was 16 To Work With Brendan Gleeson


Michael Fassbender Brendan Gleeson

Getting to meet your heroes as an actor must be one hell of a job perk, though not as much as getting to work with said hero on a movie project. For Michael Fassbender, he was a little starstruck when he met fellow Irish star Brendan Gleeson on the set of 'Trespass Against Us'.

Michael Fassbender and Brendan Gleeson star in 'Trespass Against Us'Michael Fassbender and Brendan Gleeson star in 'Trespass Against Us'

Of course, Michael Fassbender is more internationally well-known than Brendan Gleeson, and that fact wasn't lost on the latter who was just as eager to work with the younger star. Little did he know that Michael had been following him for over twenty years.

Continue reading: Michael Fassbender's Been Waiting Since He Was 16 To Work With Brendan Gleeson

Trespass Against Us Review

Very Good

With an extra dose of attitude and energy, this Irish comedy-drama hits us like a punch in the nose, launching at full speed and never letting up. It's a funny and edgy portrait of three generations of a family stuck in a cycle of criminality and ignorance. While writer Alastair Siddons and director Adam Smith kind of lose the plot along the way, at least they aren't interested in preaching at us. Instead they create a group of unforgettable characters in a seriously messy situation.

The leader of the family is the patriarch Colby (Brendan Gleeson), who rules the community of caravans with a macho smirk and ignores the law as if it's still the good old days. His son Chad (Michael Fassbender) never learned to read, but wants his children (Georgie Smith and Kacie Anderson) to go to school. Colby thinks that's ridiculous, preferring to educate the kids by taking them along on badly planned robberies. Chad's wife Kelly (Lyndsey Marshal) wants out of this situation even more than Chad does, and she's increasingly annoyed that Colby is putting their children in danger. Will Chad have the nerve to stand up to his imperious dad?

Miraculously, the actors underplay these larger-than-life characters, creating eerily realistic, charming people whose clashes are a direct result of the changing world around them. Fassbender and Gleeson bring terrific detail to their roles and then spark off each other with such power that we don't know quite where to look. It's utterly riveting, drawing out personal grit along with darker themes. And it's not surprising that other characters are less fleshed-out. Marshal is most impressive in the scenes in which the seriously tough Kelly locks horns with Colby. And a couple of side characters register nicely: Rory Kinnear as a beleaguered cop trying to get the drop on this gang and Sean Harris as a mentally unstable family member.

Continue reading: Trespass Against Us Review

Trespass Against Us Trailer


Chad Cutler is an Irish traveller who entered a life of crime at a young age, following in the footsteps of his father before him, Colby. Now that his own son Tyson is growing up, he wants to show him the ropes. Teaching him to drive a car through the fields is one thing, though, and he's starting to realise that introducing him into a world of police chases and robberies is very much another. Chad is becoming disillusioned with the lifestyle with which his family is accustomed, and wants to find a new path for both himself and his child. While his mother Kelly is supportive of his feelings, she and everyone else knows that Colby won't hear anything about it. He needs to find a way to sever ties with his father, without unleashing hell on his own family.

Continue: Trespass Against Us Trailer

Live By Night Review

Good

Ben Affleck launched his directing career 10 years ago with his film of Dennis Lehane's novel Gone Baby Gone, and he now returns to the author to adapt this Prohibition-era gangster drama. It's a big, beefy story with colourful characters and a snaky, expansive plot. And it's beautifully assembled by a skilled cast and crew. Even so, the film never quite generates quite enough energy to engage properly with the audience.

In 1927 Boston, Joe (Affleck) is a war veteran who has turned to crime to survive. But problems arise when he launches a torrid affair with the moll (Sienna Miller) of the Irish mob boss (Robert Glenister). With his life in danger, he turns to the rival Italian mafioso (Remo Girone) for a job, and is sent to Tampa to run their rum-smuggling operation. Working with his pal Dion (Chris Messina), Joe makes a success of a string of speak-easy bars and finds love with a the sister (Zoe Saldana) of a Cuban gangster. Then as he plans to open a huge casino, his gentlemanly agreement with the local police chief (Chris Cooper) is threatened. And it doesn't help that the boss in Boston begins to meddle.

Everything is assembled with a sumptuous sense of style, from the cool cars to the epic suits and hats. The film looks gorgeous, shot with muted colours that echo the subdued emotions of people who never quite say what they think. Of course, this creates a big problem, because it leaves Affleck's Joe looking like a blank slate, intriguing to watch but impossible to sympathise with. Nothing feels properly developed, with romances that seem to exist for no real reason and business relationships that appear to be based on some sort of unexplained subterfuge. The most riveting element of the story is Joe's clash with the KKK, a powerfully bull-headed group that refuses to play by the usual mob rules.

Continue reading: Live By Night Review

Assassin's Creed Review

Weak

Hopes were high that this film might finally crack the curse of movies based on videogames. There may have been some hits (like Tomb Raider or the Resident Evil franchise), but none has ever been critically acclaimed. So perhaps reuniting the cast and director of 2015's Macbeth might finally break the cycle. But while there's plenty of whizzy stuntwork, this film never finds a story or characters to grab hold of the audience.

In present-day Texas, death row prisoner Cal (Michael Fassbender) is executed by lethal injection and wakes up in a gloomy fortress towering over Madrid. He's been saved by shady businessman Rikkin (Jeremy Irons), whose daughter Sofia (Marion Cotillard) is a scientist experimenting with DNA memory. Rikkin needs Cal to travel back into his own history using a mechanical contraption called an Animus to find out where his 15th century ancestor Aguilar (also Fassbender) hid the Apple of Eden, which holds the key to controlling human will. But Cal discovers that he is the last in a long line of Assassins who have sworn to protect the apple from Knights Templar like Rikkin or his imperious supreme leader Ellen (the fabulously gloomy Charlotte Rampling).

The idea is a clever one, and director Justin Kurzel keeps the visuals grounded with action that feels earthy and real rather than digitally manipulated. Indeed, the combination of sleek sci-fi thrills with medieval fantasy horror is very cool. But there's one huge problem with the premise: all of the big fight sequences and eye-catching parkour acrobatics take place in distant history. Cal can experience these things, but he can't actually do anything, so there's no peril involved. Instead, we get endless explanations of the technology and historical inter-connections, which never quite make sense regardless of how much the characters talk about them.

Continue reading: Assassin's Creed Review

Michael Fassbender Hopes 'Trespass Against Us' Will Provoke Discussion


Michael Fassbender Brendan Gleeson

Michael Fassbender took the time to speak about his lead role in the upcoming film Trespass Against Us.

The film, which also stars Brendan Gleeson, Rory Kinnear and Sean Harris, made its world premiere at the Toronto International Film Festival back in September. It is released in the United States on January 20th and in Britain on March 3rd.

Speaking at the BFI Film Festival recently, the 39 year old actor described the nature of the story, about a father who’s trying to break away from a crime family and do what’s best for his son, but keeps getting dragged back in.

Continue reading: Michael Fassbender Hopes 'Trespass Against Us' Will Provoke Discussion

Assassin's Creed Trailer


Callum Lynch is a criminal facing the death sentence but is given a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to escape his fate by joining the mysterious Animus Project set up by Abstergo Industries. Abstergo is to its time essentially what the Knights Templar was in the 12th and 13th century, and want to hook Lynch up to an experimental piece of technology that will allow him to experience and explore the memories of his ancestor Aguilar de Nerha who lived as an Assassin in 15th century Spain. He's returning to the age of the Spanish Inquisition which means he must absorb the warrior skills of his long-dead relative - but that only means that he's developing the tools to take down the organisation that pose a threat to him in the modern day. 

Continue: Assassin's Creed Trailer

Live By Night Trailer


Joe Coughlin was born and raised in a good family, his father was the police captain and they were a respected family in the neighbourhood. Joe was the dark horse and fell in with the wrong crowd from an influential age. It was 1920's and Joe and the rest of the Coughlin family lived in the thriving city of Boston. Joe constantly seemed to be pulling in a different direction to that of his father and mixed with some of the town's most feared bosses responsible for any number of crimes from running alcohol to robbery.

Caught in the middle of a war between mob bosses, Joe ends up ripping off the wrong guy in more than one way as he also steals his woman. Everything appears to be going for Joe and his small gang but their next heist is a chance too far and sees Joe being put in prison for robbery. Once again, Joe finds himself falling in with another powerful boss who offers him protection in prison - but at a cost.

With his eventual release, Joe moves to Florida to begin over seeing a rum smuggling operation but as Joe finds love he begins to realise that there's more to life than working on someone else's terms but perhaps he's too deeply connected to ever be able to give up the life he's made for himself.

Assassin's Creed Trailer


Assassin's Creed sees Michael Fassbender cast as the protagonist Callum Lynch, in this action adventure film that is based on the video game franchise of the same name. Lynch's identity no longer exists and he is forced by revolutionary technology to hear, see and feel the memories of his ancestor Aguilar de Nerha, who was an assassin during the Spanish Inquisition.

Continue: Assassin's Creed Trailer

In The Heart Of The Sea Review

Excellent

With a huge budget and a relatively small story, this is an intriguingly offbeat blockbuster that might struggle to find an audience. Basically, it's aimed at fans of more thoughtful, personal stories of tenacity and survival, but it's shot with a massive special effects budget that sometimes seems to swamp the drama. Still, it's involving and moving. And it's also fascinatingly based on the true events that inspired Moby Dick.

The story is framed in 1850 as novelist Herman Melville (Ben Whishaw) visits an ageing sailor named Tom (Brendan Gleeson) to quiz him about a momentous event in his past that he has never spoken of. Flash back to 1820 Nantucket, and Tom (Tom Holland) is a rookie crew member on the whaling ship Essex, working under the posh, privileged Captain George (Benjamin Walker) and his able but low-class first mate Owen (Chris Hemsworth). As these these two leaders clash against each other, the ship sails off for what will be a very long journey. Eventually they head into the Pacific in search of a mythical pod of whales. But when they find it, they run afoul of a gigantic white whale that takes their arrival personally, sinking their ship and pursuing the survivors in their lifeboats.

All of this is staged as an epic battle between humanity and nature, with layers of interest in the way these men strain to survive against unimaginable odds. It's a riveting story, beautifully shot and rendered with immersive effects. And the cast members create complex characters who are profoundly changed by their experience. Not only is there mammoth action, but there's plenty of barbed interaction and even some strongly emotional moments that bring the themes home to a modern audience. Sometimes this aspect feels a bit corny, as clearly whalers at the time wouldn't feel remorse about killing one of these majestic creatures. But we would.

Continue reading: In The Heart Of The Sea Review

Brian Gleeson, Brendan Gleeson and Domhnall Gleeson - Celebrities at the RTE studios for 'The Late Late Show' - Dublin, Ireland - Friday 12th December 2014

Brian Gleeson, Brendan Gleeson and Domhnall Gleeson
Brian Gleeson, Brendan Gleeson and Domhnall Gleeson
Brian Gleeson, Brendan Gleeson and Domhnall Gleeson

Brian Gleeson, Leona Allen, Brendan Gleeson and Domhnall Gleeson - Actor family Brian Gleeson, Brendan Gleeson, and Domhnall Gleeson rehearsal for the stage play 'The Walworth Farce' at the Clasac The rehearsal room. The play opens on the 14th January 2015 at The Olympia Theatre. - Dublin, Ireland - Thursday 4th December 2014

Brian Gleeson, Leona Allen, Brendan Gleeson and Domhnall Gleeson
Brian Gleeson, Brendan Gleeson and Domhnall Gleeson
Brian Gleeson, Brendan Gleeson and Domhnall Gleeson
Brian Gleeson, Brendan Gleeson and Domhnall Gleeson
Brian Gleeson, Brendan Gleeson and Domhnall Gleeson
Brian Gleeson, Brendan Gleeson and Domhnall Gleeson

Brendan Gleeson - 'The Grand Seduction' screening at the Lighthouse Cinema in Smithfield - Dublin, Ireland - Thursday 21st August 2014

Brendan Gleeson
Brendan Gleeson
Brendan Gleeson
Brendan Gleeson
Brendan Gleeson

'Edge Of Tomorrow' May Be Recycled, But It's Not Rubbish


Tom Cruise Emily Blunt Brendan Gleeson Doug Liman

Fancy an action blockbuster this weekend? Doug Liman's hotly anticipated new sci-fi action epic Edge of Tomorrow finally sees its US release today and is set for a monster opening. Well, the critical winds are certainly blowing in the right direction: the film is unabashedly action-packed but complements its meat-headedness with moral dilemmas and a disturbing view of the future of humanity.

Tom Cruise takes the lead in this military sci-fi movie, playing a man reliving his death in battle against an alien force over and over again. Cruise plays Lt. Col. Bill Cage and co-star Emily Blunt is Special Forces soldier Rita Vrataski in this exciting new alien combat thriller.

Adapted by Screenwriter Dante Harper, Edge of Tomorrow is based on Hiroshi Sakurazaka's Japanese light novel All You Need Is Kill which combines a mind-boggling time loop scenario - think Groundhog Day crossed with Source Code - with heart-racing action scenes, evoking Cruise's own Oblivion and Matt Damon's Elysium.

Continue reading: 'Edge Of Tomorrow' May Be Recycled, But It's Not Rubbish

Brendan Gleeson Tries To Charm The Doctor In 'The Grand Seduction' [Trailer]


Brendan Gleeson Taylor Kitsch

With one darkly comic Irish film already receiving rave reviews, Brendan Gleeson is starring in a lightly comic Canadian one, which, by the looks of the trailer, will have exactly the same effect. Taylor Kitsch also stars in ‘The Grand Seduction’, which has a brand new trailer below.

The Grand SeductionFrench takes the doctor fishing 'The Grand Seduction' 

The film sees Murray French (Gleeson) rally the troops of Tickle Cove, a picturesque harbour town, to convince a visiting doctor to stay permanently so the local factor can keep its business contract alive and provide the locals with work. But with such a motley and lazy crew, he’s got his work cut out. 

Continue reading: Brendan Gleeson Tries To Charm The Doctor In 'The Grand Seduction' [Trailer]

For Brendan Gleeson, His Role In 'Calvary' Was Mental Grind


Brendan Gleeson Kelly Reilly

Brendan Gleeson has admitted that he found it difficult to switch between normal life and the harrowed, good natures priest he portrays in the critically acclaimed Calvary.

CalvaryBrendan Gleeson and Kelly Rielly star in 'Calvary'

A good priest in a small town populated by people with dark thoughts, James Lavelle’s life is threatened during a confession. Of course, they’re anonymous things, confessions, and he spends what he believes to be the rest of his living days attempting to narrow down his would-be murderer. 

Continue reading: For Brendan Gleeson, His Role In 'Calvary' Was Mental Grind

Brendan Gleeson - 'Suffragettes' filming on location in London - London, United Kingdom - Friday 11th April 2014

Brendan Gleeson
Brendan Gleeson

Killian Scott, John Michael McDonagh and Brendan Gleeson - Celebrities at the RTE studios for The Late Late Show - Dublin, Ireland - Saturday 29th March 2014

Killian Scott, John Michael Mcdonagh and Brendan Gleeson
Killian Scott, John Michael Mcdonagh and Brendan Gleeson
Killian Scott, John Michael Mcdonagh and Brendan Gleeson
Killian Scott, John Michael Mcdonagh and Brendan Gleeson
Killian Scott
Killian Scott, John Michael Mcdonagh and Brendan Gleeson

Brendan Gleeson - Jameson Dublin International Film Festival - Opening Night - Dublin, Ireland - Friday 14th February 2014

Brendan Gleeson
Brendan Gleeson
Brendan Gleeson
Brendan Gleeson
Brendan Gleeson
Brendan Gleeson

Brendan Gleeson - Celebrities outside The Merrion Hotel - Dublin, Ireland - Friday 14th February 2014

Brendan Gleeson

Brendan Gleeson - Guests arrive at the Jameson Dublin International Film Festival opening Gala premiere of 'Calvary' at The Savoy, Dublin - Dublin, Ireland - Thursday 13th February 2014

Brendan Gleeson
Brendan Gleeson
Brendan Gleeson

Brendan Gleeson - Guests arrive at the Jameson Dublin International Film Festival opening Gala premiere of 'Calvary' at The Savoy... - Dublin, Ireland - Thursday 13th February 2014

Brendan Gleeson
Brendan Gleeson
Brendan Gleeson
Brendan Gleeson

Brendan Gleeson - 64th Berlin International Film Festival (Berlinale) - 'Calvary' - Photocall - Berlin, Germany - Sunday 9th February 2014

Brendan Gleeson
Brendan Gleeson
Brendan Gleeson
Brendan Gleeson
Brendan Gleeson

A Week In Movies: SAG And Globe Nominations, The Stars Hit Europe, Big Sci-fi Trailers Debut...


Tom Cruise Leonardo Dicaprio Martin Freeman Channing Tatum Brendan Gleeson Jason Bateman

The Wolf Of Wall Street Logo

As we move properly into awards season, films are jostling to be the frontrunner. This week saw nominations announced by the Golden Globes and the Screen Actors Guild, two key awards in the run-up to Oscar night. At the moment, the leading contenders are David O Russell's Abscam comedy-drama American Hustle and Steve McQueen's 12 Years a Slave. But anything can happen, see the other contenders here.

The dark horse in the awards race is The Wolf of Wall Street, a late entry into contention. The film held its European premiere in Paris on Monday, attended by Leonardo Dicaprio, director Martin Scorsese and costar Jean Dujardin. Buzz is growing quickly for the film, which opens in most cinemas in January. Watch the latest trailer for Wolf Of Wall Street here!

Continue reading: A Week In Movies: SAG And Globe Nominations, The Stars Hit Europe, Big Sci-fi Trailers Debut...

Atmosphere and Brendan Gleeson Friday 23rd March 2012 Photocall for the release of 'The Pirates! in an Adventure with Scientists' at the new Odeon Cinema in Point Village

Atmosphere and Brendan Gleeson

The Raven Review


Very Good
An acerbic sense of humour and a gleefully grisly production style make this gothic thriller good fun to watch. It may be rather preposterous, but it's also a grippingly complex mystery populated by some terrific actors.

In the weeks before his inexplicable death in 1849, author Edgar Allan Poe (Cusack) finds himself at the centre of a series of murders in which a killer is recreating his stories in grotesque scenarios around Baltimore. Detective Fields (Evans) asks Edgar to help with the case, but he's distracted by his girlfriend Emily (Eve), whose harsh father (Gleeson) refuses to allow the couple to marry. As the murders get increasingly personal for Edgar, he realises that his own fate is entwined with the fiendishly clever killer, whoever he may be.

Continue reading: The Raven Review

Liam Cunningham and Brendan Gleeson - Liam Cunningham and Brendan Gleeson Saturday 11th February 2012 The Irish Film and Television Awards 2012 at the Dublin Convention Centre - Arrivals

Liam Cunningham and Brendan Gleeson

Brendan Gleeson Tuesday 7th February 2012 New York Premiere of 'Safe House' held at the SVA Theater - Arrivals

Brendan Gleeson
Brendan Gleeson
Brendan Gleeson
Brendan Gleeson

Albert Nobbs Trailer


Ever since the age of fifteen, Albert Nobbs has worked and lived in hotels. Thirty years later, he is a dedicated servant at Morrison's Hotel. He goes out of his way to make the guests feel at home and is generally well-liked.

Continue: Albert Nobbs Trailer

Brendan Gleeson and Old Billingsgate - Brendan Gleeson, London, England - The 2011 Moet British Independent Film Awards at Old Billingsgate Market. Sunday 4th December 2011

Brendan Gleeson and Old Billingsgate
Brendan Gleeson and Old Billingsgate
Brendan Gleeson and Old Billingsgate
Brendan Gleeson and Old Billingsgate
Brendan Gleeson and Old Billingsgate

Brendan Gleeson and Old Billingsgate Sunday 4th December 2011 The British Independent film awards 2011 at Old Billingsgate Market London, England

Brendan Gleeson and Old Billingsgate

The Pirates! In An Adventure With Scientists Trailer


The Pirate Captain has never won the Pirate of the Year award but this year he hopes to do so. He sets out with his crew - some are pirates, some are not, some are just fish he dressed up in a pirate hat - to beat his rivals Black Bellamy and Cutlass Liz. Along the way, he travels to places as diverse as Blood Island and Victorian London and joins forces with a young Charles Darwin. The Captain and his crew must also avoid Queen Elizabeth - who is determined to wipe out pirates from the seas.

Continue: The Pirates! In An Adventure With Scientists Trailer

The Guard Trailer


Sergeant Gerry Boyle is a cop, working in a small town in County Galway, in the western part of Ireland, with a love of prostitutes, dropping acid on his days off and a dying mother. Whilst on the job, he doesn't follow the rulebook and he thinks that everyone he's met is an idiot.

Continue: The Guard Trailer

Brendan Gleeson Sunday 5th June 2011 Brendan Gleeson filming Safehouse Washington DC, USA

Brendan Gleeson
Brendan Gleeson
Brendan Gleeson
Brendan Gleeson
Brendan Gleeson
Brendan Gleeson

Brendan Gleeson Friday 27th May 2011 at the ITV studios London, England

Brendan Gleeson
Brendan Gleeson
Brendan Gleeson
Brendan Gleeson

Brendan Gleeson - Brendan Gleeson, Dublin, Ireland - 'Irish Film and Television Awards' at Convention Centre Dublin - Arrivals Saturday 12th February 2011

Brendan Gleeson
Brendan Gleeson

Brendan Gleeson - Friday 21st January 2011 at Sundance Film Festival Park City, Utah

Brendan Gleeson
Brendan Gleeson
Brendan Gleeson
Brendan Gleeson

Harry Potter And The Deathly Hallows: Part 1 Review


Excellent

Cranking up the action and emotion, JK Rowling's Harry Potter saga moves into the first half of its extended grand finale. It's a relatively harrowing film punctuated by real violence, and it cleverly starts weaving together both the plot and the relationships.

After the tragic events of the previous school year, Harry (Radcliffe) and his pals Ron and Hermoine (Grint and Watson) know that they can't go back to normal. Instead, they're on the run from Voldemort (Fiennes) and his fearsome Death Eaters. They also have an overwhelming task: collecting the horcruxes that Voldemort has hidden to ensure his immortality. But where to look? And when they find one, how do they destroy it? Then a rebel journalist (Ifans) tells them the story of the Deathly Hallows, which makes their quest even more urgent.

The plot has a very different structure, as our three heroes are propelled by startling events into increasingly uncertain situations. Persistently chased by the bad guys and unable to trust anyone, they are profoundly alone and constantly in danger. We strongly feel their lonely desperation all the way through the film, so when another nasty thing happens to push them further along, it's genuinely unsettling.

Although it feels far too long, Yates and Kloves thankfully mix the dark drama with lighter comedy, allowing the characters to grow organically. Over seven films the story has grown increasingly gloomy but, despite the relentless anxiety, this chapter has an insistent pace, which is helpful since pretty nightmarish things are happening. There's also some subtext in the political storyline, as the villains seize control first of the media and then the government.

By now, the three central actors have settled solidly into their roles, adding subtle edges in every scene. Intriguingly, Grint has emerged as the most complex performer, but all three are excellent. And the who's who of British acting talent around them is fantastic. Stand-outs this time are Nighy (as a slippery politician), Isaacs (as a disgraced baddie) and Mullan (as a vicious security guy). But several others get a chance to shine as well, and of course there's a lot more action to come in Part 2.

The Secret Of Kells Review


Excellent
Stunning imagery and an unusual story lift this far above the average animated feature. With its deeply Irish themes and an inventive approach to illustration, it's like an ancient folk tale storybook come to life. No wonder Oscar voters noticed it.

In a Medieval village called Kells, the young Brendan (voiced by McGuire) has never been outside the walls. His uncle (Gleeson) is the abbot, and is only concerned with building strong defences against the marauding Viking horde. But Brendan and the other monks have art and history on their minds, and find themselves entranced when Father Aidan (Lally) comes to visit, bringing his mysterious, legendary book. Aidan takes an interest in Brendan, sparking his creativity and curiosity to venture into the forest outside the walls, where he meets the mysterious Aisling (Mooney).

Continue reading: The Secret Of Kells Review

Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows (Part 1) Trailer


The final instalment of the Harry Potter series is almost upon us! Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows will bring the much loved set of films to a close.

Continue: Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows (Part 1) Trailer

Perrier's Bounty Review


Good
Lively and rude, this comical crime thriller keeps us engaged with its likeable characters even when the plot begins to feel pointless. In the end, there's not much to the film, but it's enjoyable while it lasts.

Michael (Murphy) is a slacker who has four hours to pay back his loan shark Perrier (Gleeson) before a bounty is put out on him. On this fateful day, he teams up with his dying father Jim (Broadbent) and his neighbour Brenda (Whittaker), who accidentally gets involved in his mess. As they run around Dublin trying to stay one step ahead of the goons, as well as a couple of zealous traffic wardens, this trio is forced to examine their lives and relationships, often in the face of imminent injury.

Continue reading: Perrier's Bounty Review

Green Zone Review


Extraordinary
Based on Rajiv Chandrasekaran's true account Imperial Life in the Emerald City, this film never pauses for breath throughout a story set in the weeks following the 2003 invasion of Baghdad. It's provocative, involving and utterly gripping.

Miller (Damon) is a military officer charged with locating weapons of mass destruction, but every site he visits is a dead end. When he voices doubts about the intelligence, he gets in trouble with the Pentagon chief (Kinnear).

On the other hand, the CIA director (Gleeson) is sympathetic, and encourages him to dig around. So with the help of a local translator (Abdalla), Miller dives in. And he's quickly caught between two factions in his own government as he searches for an Iraqi general (Naor) in hiding.

Continue reading: Green Zone Review

Brendan Gleeson Wednesday 10th March 2010 Irish Premiere of 'Perrier's Bounty' held at the Savoy Cinema Dublin Ireland

Brendan Gleeson
Brendan Gleeson

Green Zone Trailer


Watch the trailer for Green Zone.

Continue: Green Zone Trailer

In Bruges Review


Excellent
The Bruges Chamber of Commerce should be delighted with at least part of Martin McDonagh's film In Bruges, as it provides an unprecedented and absolutely ravishing look at the architecture of this gorgeous Belgian town that appears to have been dropped into the 21st century from a pristine, fairy-tale version of the Middle Ages. They should be happy as a good number of people, after seeing the film, will be tempted to hop on the next flight to the little jewel box of a medieval village, all canals and pristinely preserved Gothic architecture. Such town boosters will be less delighted with other aspects of this dark-as-night comedy, in which a pair of hitmen hiding out in the town spend their time arguing over whether or not the town is, in fact, "a shithole." Later on, the guns come out, large quantities of blood are spilled, and a story that had been weaving a fairy-tale ambience up until that point turns into an entirely different kind of fairy tale -- one that doesn't exactly cater to tourists.

Writer/director McDonagh has dabbled in fairy tales before, in his grimly funny and ultraviolent stage plays like the Tarantino-esque The Lieutenant of Inishmore and, particularly, The Pillowman, which knocked Broadway audiences for a loop back in 2005 with its mix of bloody, Grimm-like Germanic storytelling and anonymous, Kafkaesque modernity. With his feature directorial debut (his short film, Six Shooter, won an Oscar in 2006), McDonagh takes his particular theatrical affinity for finding cockeyed laughs in horrendous situations and creates a precisely structured and knock-you-down hilarious comedy of violence with a film that (hopefully) announces a great new cinematic talent.

Continue reading: In Bruges Review

Beowulf Review


OK
From the advent of sound with 1927's The Jazz Singer to the computer-generated effects breakthrough of 1989's The Abyss -- advancements in technology have had a major impact on cinematic storytelling, for better and worse. New technologies open up more cinematic experiences and new avenues for directors and actors to explore their craft. But it's easy to get caught up in the razzmatazz of the latest spectacle, instead of focusing on age-old, tried and true thematic substance. And that's exactly Beowulf's tragic flaw.

The Beowulf legend originates from a 700 A.D. oral tradition that was adapted in epic poem form by the English and into film form by director Robert Zemeckis -- using motion-captured live-action performances that are turned into a computer-generated light show. Much like the IMAX 3D screenings of Zemeckis' previous effort, The Polar Express, Beowulf's tale of a hero who comes to rid a Scandinavian village of its monster, while screaming his name every chance he gets, is more a showcase for RealD technology than an engaging film.

Continue reading: Beowulf Review

Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix Trailer


Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix
Trailer

Continue: Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix Trailer

Kingdom Of Heaven Review


OK
I'll be the first to admit that I'm a dead sucker for big-battle hero pictures, but these days, movies like this are released every month. And coming from Ridley Scott, who is one of the real standard-setters for flicks of this ilk, I'm going into Kingdom of Heaven with high expectations: I want a hero who tugs my heart strings, a love story that moves me to tears, a villain who makes me seethe with hate, and action that gets my pulse racing.

Judging from his body of work, Ridley Scott obviously likes a good hero story, too. But, sadly, this, his latest epic hero film, is without one key ingredient: the hero. And as he's the director and the producer of this disappointing monstrosity, he's got no one to blame but himself.

Continue reading: Kingdom Of Heaven Review

Harry Potter And The Goblet Of Fire Review


Excellent

For the uninitiated, Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire was the book where author J.K. Rowling finally went off her rocker, turning out a 734-page monster of a book (vs. 309 pages for #1) that made everyone wonder if any child could possibly have that kind of attention span.

Turns out they did: Book four is also where Rowling went from Big Hit to Mega Worldwide Sensation, and the Harry Potter series became a cultural touchstone. (This is also about the time that ultra-right wing groups started denouncing the series as demonic.)

And so, everything that is past is prologue: The first three films now feel like nothing more than window dressing for this one, a rich movie with expert plotting, clever humor, and a sophistication lacking in the earlier pictures. At the same time, it's fine for (older) kids, who'll root for Harry and Co. through his many scrapes in this edition.

Goblet of Fire finds Potter (Daniel Radcliffe) back for his fourth year at Hogwarts Academy. Things are getting heavier for the lad: He's having vivid dreams about Lord Voldemort being revived in the flesh. On top of that, the school is hosting the legendary Tri-Wizard Tournament, in which three aspiring magicians will compete to win a fancy blue cup (plus bragging rights), which brings two foreign schools -- one a collection of brutish Russian guys, another a group of breathless French fairy queens -- into Hogwarts for the term. While the tournament is meant for older kids, naturally the undersized Potter will find his way into the mix. On top of that, Harry's got some raging hormones, which has him swooning for fellow student Cho (Katie Leung), while Ron (Rupert Grint) tries in vain to suppress his budding love for Hermione (Emma Watson). This comes to a head of sorts during a formal dance, one of the film's most memorable scenes. And all the while, Voldemort inches closer to Harry.

Overall, the story is obviously and dramatically pared down from the book. Even I, a non-reader, could tell that there were huge gaps in the plot. Strangely, it doesn't really matter. All but the bare essentials have been stripped away, and even though it tops 2 1/2 hours, Goblet is a lean, mean, storytelling machine. There's rarely a dull moment (a stark contrast to some of the overblown earlier installments in the series), and it's amazingly easy to follow the serpentine plot. Partly this is because we've had three movies to get up to speed on the myriad characters of Potter, and even though Goblet introduces a good number of new faces, keeping track of them is a snap. The downside of this is that, aside from a little romance for the main three characters, there's not much time to develop our heroes further. But really, it isn't needed. They're fleshy enough as it is, and the film does give them a bit more structure to set up #5.

Speculation has been rampant about how director Mike Newell -- of Four Weddings and a Funeral fame -- would work out as the helmer of an action-oriented kid flick. Turns out, he's better than those who came before him. Not only does Newell have a good handle over the film's action showpieces, he knows how to deal with awkward romances and growing pains of the teen years. Maybe it's because he's the first British director to try his hand at this very British series?

Speaking of the action: The special effects in this installment are hands-down better than ever. There's probably not a single scene in Goblet of Fire that isn't manipulated with CGI in some way -- but you'll never notice. The effects are so good and so seamless that you seriously can't tell the difference (reality-wise) between Radcliffe and the giant, fire-breathing dragon staring him down.

And speaking of dragons: The film is scary, more so than the other three. As a case in point, the woman sitting in front of me, with two kids aged about six to eight, had to leave the theater after the first two minutes because the little ones were so frightened.

Altogether the film is just about right for what a Harry Potter movie ought to be. The story is consistently interesting but not too confusing, the dialogue is spot-on, and the film blends action and quiet moments perfectly. (Frankly, the film should win an Oscar for editing.)

But overall Goblet of Fire has succeeded in doing one big thing that the first three movies completely failed at: For the first time, I'm actually looking forward to the next in the series.

A little magic ought to fix that arm right up, no?

The Tailor Of Panama Review


Good
Somebody told Pierce Brosnan to change his image.

In The Tailor of Panama -- based on John Le Carré's novel and directed by John Boorman (Beyond Rangoon, Zardoz) -- Brosnan trades in the sophistication of James Bond for the identity of crude, disgraced spy Andy Osnard, an MI-6 operative that has to be shipped off to Panama on account of his loathsome behavior. Once he arrives in Panama City, the bad behavior doesn't stop: Osnard immediately sets upon the task of uncovering "what's going on" with the Panama Canal. Rumors swirl that it will be sold to another country now that Panama has it back from the U.S. Or perhaps there will be a coup from a populist underground?

Continue reading: The Tailor Of Panama Review

Mission: Impossible 2 Review


Good
Editor's Note: Rarely have two so divergent reviews for one movie crossed my desk on the same day. To wit, we present a unique experience for filmcritic.com -- something of a "He Said, He Said" -- two looks at Mission: Impossible 2, from two of our most vocal critics. -CN

James Brundage, the exuberant fan:

Continue reading: Mission: Impossible 2 Review

28 Days Later Review


Excellent
Although its title might lead you to believe that they actually made a sequel to the awful Sandra Bullock movie about alcoholism, 28 Days Later is anything but a journey through rehab. In fact, the disturbing, grotesque nature of the film makes rehab look like a peaceful picnic at the zoo... well, just as long as there aren't monkeys at that zoo.

The recipe for 28 Days Later is quite simple: half Outbreak, half Night of the Living Dead, and maybe a dash or two of Planet of the Apes. While the ingredients are familiar, thankfully, director Danny Boyle, who also helmed the bizarre Trainspotting, contributes his own unique seasonings, turning this acidic dish into a journey through hell-on-earth; it's one of the most frightening movies of the year.

Continue reading: 28 Days Later Review

Lake Placid Review


OK
It's crocodile season, opening the hunting period on an animal that has been woefully underused in the horror movie litany to date. But unlike most horror/thriller pics, this one features a script by David E. Kelley, best known as the creator of TV's Ally McBeal.

So there's some promise here. But does this monster movie rise above recent crap like Anaconda or Jaws 3-D? A little. It's better than Anaconda, anyway.

Continue reading: Lake Placid Review

The Village Review


Very Good
The Village comes to us with more manufactured hype than should be allowed by law. First the Sci-Fi Channel produces a "documentary" about its director, M. Night Shyamalan, called The Buried Secret of M. Night Shyamalan, purporting to reveal all sorts of juicy dirt about the director. The week that The Village is set to open, Sci-Fi confesses it's all a hoax. Details of the plot have been minimal. No one will do press. No one will talk about the movie at all. Come screening week, security is tight at advance previews: Online press are strictly disallowed at the advances; instead we're shooed into a late Thursday-night showing, giving us mere hours to whip up a review just in time for the Friday crush of traffic. So here I sit, pushing midnight, ready to give you my thoughts on The Village.

Why all the misdirection from Shyamalan? Well, here's the truth: The Village isn't a really a traditional suspense flick at all. The first full hour is largely comprised of a romance - or various romances - between its stars. Joaquin Phoenix is a quiet lad named Lucius living in an 1897 village formed in a clearing in the woods in Pennsylvania, where some 30 or so folks reside. Bryce Dallas Howard (the girl who looks like Uma Thurman in Kill Bill) plays his eventual girlfriend, Ivy, the blind daughter of the town's leader of sorts, Edward (William Hurt). Lucius and Ivy take a long while to fall in love - meanwhile we slowly learn about the village. Here, they grow their own vegetables, they do a mean square dance, and then there's the matter of the monsters in the woods.

Continue reading: The Village Review

Cold Mountain Review


Weak
Masterpiece Theater meets Mayberry in Anthony Minghella's Cold Mountain, a stodgy and superfluous adaptation of Charles Frazier's Civil War romance novel that's every bit as unconvincing as it's meant to be epic. Frigid and detached to the point of numbness, the passionless period piece is too staged, too dry, and too silly to matter, though Minghella earns bonus points for staying consistently dishonest and uneven from start to finish.

Minghella tells Mountain in two parts that fail to complement each other. In one, wounded Civil War soldier Inman (Jude Law) reaches his breaking point on Virginia's blood-soaked battlefields and decides he can't spend another day without his true love, Ada (Nicole Kidman). So he puts down his rifle and begins the long walk back to Cold Mountain, N.C. Meanwhile, back home, Ada struggles to maintain her father's house after the man passes away in a disgustingly symbolic rainstorm. She accepts help from the town tomboy (Renée Zellweger) and learns a thing or two about patience, hope, and independence in the face of danger.

Continue reading: Cold Mountain Review

Braveheart Review


Excellent
Mel Gibson deserves a lot more credit than I've been giving him. A few years ago, no one could have conceived that the action star could pull off the lead role in a dazzling, epic, historical adventure-thriller-romance, let alone direct it. But he does, making Braveheart a vastly entertaining and powerful film.

Gibson plays Scottish hero William Wallace, a Scotsman with simple roots who finds himself thrust into a role as leader of the Scottish revolt against England in the late 13th century. After the despicable King Edward the Longshanks (Edward I) decrees that English nobles will have the right to sexual relations with all newly-wed Scottish women, the revolution is set in motion. Wallace takes up the cause, only to find himself facing incredible odds against a superior English army and fighting Scottish nobles who want to negotiate peace instead of fight. In fact, it's the nobles who turn out to be the bigger obstacle.

Continue reading: Braveheart Review

Dark Blue Review


Weak
Call it L.A. Confidential lite. In Ron Shelton's derivative new police corruption drama - adapted from a story by Confidential scribe James Ellroy - Kurt Russell stars as Sgt. Eldon Perry Jr., a self-professed gunslinger who sees himself as a noble warrior charged with cleaning up his beloved city's streets. A member of the LAPD's elite Special Investigations Squad, he's the kind of guy who freely expounds on the depravity of L.A.'s lower classes with a barrage of bigoted epithets, and feels no pangs of conscience when gunning down unarmed suspects in back alleys. According to Perry's tunnel vision logic, a criminal is a criminal, and worrying about the vague, inconsequential differences between each one is not only a waste of time, but a disservice to the community he's trying to save.

Unfortunately for Perry, it's April 1992, and not a very good time to be an arrogant, white LAPD officer. The Rodney King trial has set L.A. on the precipice of Armageddon, and the verdict - to be announced imminently - has become the focal point for a metropolis simmering with class and racial tension. Perry, however, has more pressing matters to worry about. His partner, a wet-behind-the-ears rookie named Bobby Keough (played with baby-faced blankness by ex-Felicity hunk Scott Speedman), has screwed up an arrest, and Perry - always looking to back up a fellow brother in blue - has killed the defenseless perp (with Keough's gun) rather than letting him escape. The film begins with both officers knee-deep into lying their way through an eight-hour inquiry, since Perry has decided that his incompetent protégé should take the heat for the killing anyway. As far as Perry is concerned, one's first shooting inquiry is a right of passage - a baptism into an immoral system that's primarily sworn to protect and serve its own members.

Continue reading: Dark Blue Review

Kingdom Of Heaven Review


OK
I'll be the first to admit that I'm a dead sucker for big-battle hero pictures, but these days, movies like this are released every month. And coming from Ridley Scott, who is one of the real standard-setters for flicks of this ilk, I'm going into Kingdom of Heaven with high expectations: I want a hero who tugs my heart strings, a love story that moves me to tears, a villain who makes me seethe with hate, and action that gets my pulse racing.

Judging from his body of work, Ridley Scott obviously likes a good hero story, too. But, sadly, this, his latest epic hero film, is without one key ingredient: the hero. And as he's the director and the producer of this disappointing monstrosity, he's got no one to blame but himself.

Continue reading: Kingdom Of Heaven Review

Kingdom Of Heaven Review


Weak

For almost five years now, Hollywood studios have beentrying to duplicate the success of "Gladiator"by making the same big-budget historical battle epic over ("TheLast Samurai") and over ("Troy")and over ("KingArthur") and over ("Alexander").

Each movie has re-imagined history from a modern, let's-keep-an-open-mindperspective and hewed to a shopworn formula in which the hero rallies hismen against great odds and for a greater good. He invariably leads theminto the same blood-and-mud war scenes, which are always shot in the samestaccato slow-motion that characterizes the chaos of combat but forgetsthe audience needs to be kept abreast of who is winning. The hero alsoalways finds time to romance a beautiful woman from another culture.

Aside from having different casts, the only significantvariations between these films seem to be 1) whether the hero was of noblebirth or came up from nothing to become a great leader, and 2) whetherthe battlefields are green and forested or brown and sandy. One thing mostof them definitely have in common is that they've bombed at the box office.

Continue reading: Kingdom Of Heaven Review

Lake Placid Review


OK

"Lake Placid" is a sub-standard monster movie with such a greatcast of enjoyable stars you won't even care that it's bad.

Continue reading: Lake Placid Review

Brendan Gleeson

Brendan Gleeson Quick Links

News Pictures Video Film Quotes RSS
Advertisement

Brendan Gleeson

Date of birth

29th March, 1955

Occupation

Actor

Sex

Male

Height

1.88


Advertisement
Advertisement

Brendan Gleeson Movies

Paddington 2 Movie Review

Paddington 2 Movie Review

The first Paddington movie in 2014 is already such a beloved classic that it's hard...

Hampstead Movie Review

Hampstead Movie Review

Deliberately appealing to older audiences, this undemanding comedy-drama comes with a hint of social relevance...

Paddington 2 Trailer

Paddington 2 Trailer

Since being adopted into the Brown family, Paddington bear is now a big part of...

Hampstead Trailer

Hampstead Trailer

It's been one year since Emily's husband Charles passed away, but she has very mixed...

Advertisement
Trespass Against Us Movie Review

Trespass Against Us Movie Review

With an extra dose of attitude and energy, this Irish comedy-drama hits us like a...

Trespass Against Us Trailer

Trespass Against Us Trailer

Chad Cutler is an Irish traveller who entered a life of crime at a young...

Live By Night Movie Review

Live By Night Movie Review

Ben Affleck launched his directing career 10 years ago with his film of Dennis Lehane's...

Assassin's Creed Movie Review

Assassin's Creed Movie Review

Hopes were high that this film might finally crack the curse of movies based on...

Assassin's Creed Trailer

Assassin's Creed Trailer

Callum Lynch is a criminal facing the death sentence but is given a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity...

Advertisement
Live By Night Trailer

Live By Night Trailer

Joe Coughlin was born and raised in a good family, his father was the police...

Assassin's Creed Trailer

Assassin's Creed Trailer

Assassin's Creed sees Michael Fassbender cast as the protagonist Callum Lynch, in this action adventure...

Secret Cinema Presents: 28 Days Later Movie Review

Secret Cinema Presents: 28 Days Later Movie Review

Expectations are a problem with this year's Secret Cinema event. After the jaw-dropping, goosebump-inducing surprises...

In the Heart of the Sea Movie Review

In the Heart of the Sea Movie Review

With a huge budget and a relatively small story, this is an intriguingly offbeat blockbuster...

In The Heart Of The Sea Trailer

In The Heart Of The Sea Trailer

In The Heart Of The Sea is the true seaman's tale based on the last...

Artists
Actors
    Filmmakers
      Artists
      Bands
        Musicians
          Artists
          Celebrities
             
              Artists
              Interviews
                musicians & bands in the news
                  actors & filmmakers in the news
                    celebrities in the news

                      Go Back in Time using our News archive to see what happened on a particular day in the past.