Brenda Fricker

Brenda Fricker

Brenda Fricker Quick Links

News Pictures Video Film Quotes RSS

A Long Way From Home at The Savoy

Brenda Fricker, James Fox and Virginia Gilbert - Brenda Fricker, James Fox, and Virginia Gilbert attend 'A Long Way From Home' screening at The Jameson Dublin International Film Festival (JDIFF 2014) at The Savoy... - Dublin, Ireland - Sunday 16th February 2014

James Fox and Brenda Fricker
James Fox and Brenda Fricker
Brenda Fricker
James Fox and Brenda Fricker
Brenda Fricker

Picture - Brenda Fricker, Rebecca Byrne , Friday 1st June 2012

Brenda Fricker - Brenda Fricker, Rebecca Byrne Friday 1st June 2012 The 50th Anniversary of 'The Late Late Show' at RTE Studios

Picture - Brenda Fricker , Friday 1st June 2012

Brenda Fricker Friday 1st June 2012 The 50th Anniversary of 'The Late Late Show' at RTE Studios

Brenda Fricker

Albert Nobbs Review


OK
Based on a true story, this introspective film seems to suggest that these events aren't perhaps as extraordinary as they appear. But the strong premise is weakened by writing and direction that never get a grip on the story.

In 1898, Albert (Close) works at an upscale Dublin hotel, and no one suspects that he's actually a woman. Quietly going about his work while saving to open a tobacco shop, Albert is unassuming and relentlessly polite. Then he's asked to share his room with visiting painter Hubert (McTeer), who learns his secret and reveals one of his own: he's a woman too. But Hubert has managed to have a normal married life. This inspires Albert to pursue the hotel maid Helen (Wasikowska), which is complicated by her lusty relationship with handyman Joe (Johnson).

Continue reading: Albert Nobbs Review

Picture - Brenda Fricker, John Banville and... , Saturday 18th February 2012

Brenda Fricker, Glenn Close, John Banville and Dublin International Film Festival - Brenda Fricker, John Banville and Glenn Close Saturday 18th February 2012 The Irish Premiere of Albert Nobbs at the Savoy cinema as part of the Jameson Dublin international film festival

Brenda Fricker, Glenn Close, John Banville and Dublin International Film Festival

Picture - Brenda Fricker , Saturday 18th February 2012

Brenda Fricker and Dublin International Film Festival Saturday 18th February 2012 The Irish Premiere of Albert Nobbs at the Savoy cinema as part of the Jameson Dublin international film festival

The Intended Review


Good
Who knew that in 1920s England, people would have thought that moving to Malaysia to hunt ivory would have been thought of as a good idea with a future that promises riches?

When Sarah (Janet McTeer) and her surveyor fiancee Hamish (JJ Feild) arrive in the jungle, they assume great things are on the way. But no sooner has Hamish completed his first expedition than they find the rules changing and the sad little village getting more and more disturbing. Money is withheld, sickness is contracted, murders are committed. Before long, Sarah is pathetically turning to prostitution to earn a little cash -- or even to get back the money that was stolen from her.

Continue reading: The Intended Review

So I Married an Axe Murderer Review


Extraordinary
Shhh. Don't tell anyone. There is a legion of us Axe Murderer fans out here. Most of us live in San Francisco, but we're really quite universal. Wayne's World? Pathetic by comparison. So I Married an Axe Murderer is easily Mike Myers' best movie -- hilarious, with Myers taking his comedy to a new level not hidden within a funky costume (as in Wayne or Austin Powers). We long for a sequel. And much to the annoyance of our friends, we quote it incessantly. Give this film another chance or we'll practice the ancient from of Scottish martial arts on your ass -- Fuk Yu!

Continue reading: So I Married an Axe Murderer Review

Conspiracy Of Silence Review


Weak
News flash!

Have you heard? Apparently there's some priests in the Catholic church that might be, um, gay. And apparently this might be interfering with their vows of chastity, not to mention their vows of not being gay.

Continue reading: Conspiracy Of Silence Review

The Field Review


Excellent
Richard Harris's standout performance elevates this simple fable -- and a film I've resisted seeing for over a decade -- into a near classic. The battle is a well-known one: Harris is Bull McCabe, a simple rancher who rents a small plot of land to graze his cattle. But the owner decides to sell it, and a rich American (Tom Berenger) swoops in, intent on paving the thing. At first we side with Bull, but when things turn violent (that, we're told, is "the law of the land"), we wonder if we haven't been too hasty with our judgement. Quite touching though -- owing to its theatrical origins -- it's missing a sense of grandeur.

Moll Flanders Review


Grim
Potential taglines for this movie... Moll Flanders: Less than just a bad title. Moll Flanders: Not a shopping center in Belgium. Moll Flanders: Total waste of time.

The last one is the most appropriate for this: a picture which wastes a lot of raw acting talent and pretty photography on a boring, groaning-in-your-seat story which hinges on every cliché in the book.

Continue reading: Moll Flanders Review

My Left Foot Review


Excellent
One of cinema's most infamously hoity-toity titles covers one of its most infamously arty topics: An Irish writer/painter with cerebral palsy who can only use his left foot -- and barely, at that. Never mind the eye-rolling and the nay-saying. My Left Foot is a heartfelt and soulful movie. And while you'll know you're watching an art movie when you sit down to ogle it, you're not going to find a film dripping with saccharine or even shrouded in subtitles. This is just good old-fashioned filmmaking that just so happens to be about a guy that can barely move.

Christy Brown (who died eight years before this film was made) was born with C.P. and pretty much assumed by his family to be retarded beyond hope until -- as a pre-teen -- he proved he could scrawl a word on the floor with his toes. Encouraged by his mother (Brenda Fricker), Christy learns to read and write, and even paint. Meanwhile, of course, adversity waits at every turn.

Continue reading: My Left Foot Review

A Time To Kill Review


Weak
Remember the hoopla over the novel A Time To Kill? It was celebrated author John Grisham's second book -- actually his first book -- the book he published after The Firm became a hit. The book that no one wanted before he was famous. The book, apparently, that, if it hadn't had his name on it, would never have been published.

Now it's the fourth Grisham movie to be made, continuing in grand fashion that franchise of increasingly average film versions of his increasingly average writing.

Continue reading: A Time To Kill Review

A Man Of No Importance Review


Good
Long-awaited and highly-acclaimed, A Man of No Importance has crawled into town for a limited run. In the film, Albert Finney plays Alfie Byrne, a 1960 Dublin bus director who is obsessed with Oscar Wilde and directs an annual staging of one of his plays with a cast composed of his bus's passengers.

As if that weren't enough, Alfie, stricken by "the love that dare not speak its name," is constantly at war with his emotions and his sexuality, and he is painfully infatuated with the bus's driver, Robbie (Rufus Sewell). As the annual play draws near, a new rider, Adele (well-played by Tara Fitzgerald) shows up, and Alfie decides to cast her as the virginal lead in Wilde's controversial Salome.

Continue reading: A Man Of No Importance Review

Pete's Meteor Review


Grim
Allegory? For sure. But there really is a meteor that belongs to Pete (Mike Myers in maybe his sole attempt at a dramatic role) in Pete's Meteor. That meteor in fact drives the bulk of the film's plot, an otherwise thin excuse for a story.

When the titular meteor (though it's the size of a footlocker it only leaves a 15-foot crate) lands in the backyard of a 12-year-old Irish laddie named Mickey, he presumes it was sent from heaven by his dead parents. Well, why not? Among his crazy grandmother (Brenda Fricker playing that matronly character once again), his unofficial godfather/drug addict/mob man pal Pete (Myers), and the wealthy scientist (Alfred Molina) who is given custody of the meteor by the government, Mickey's got a pretty messed up family life already. Parents speaking to him from beyond the grave sounds almost normal.

Continue reading: Pete's Meteor Review

Brenda Fricker

Brenda Fricker Quick Links

News Pictures Video Film Quotes RSS