Brad Dourif Page 2

Brad Dourif

Brad Dourif Quick Links

News Pictures Video Film RSS

Wise Blood Review


Excellent
John Huston's Wise Blood isn't bold-faced Americana. Rather, it is an alien planet of such thick perversity and everyday grotesqueries that one has to take pause and consider how close Mr. Huston's dystopia is to the American South. It is adapted from the fine first novel by Flannery O'Conner of the same name and it is the only time an American director has successfully translated the late O'Conner's haunting prose. Completed in 1979, it is also perhaps the most ballistic of Huston's late-period films.

Hazel Motes, played by Brad Dourif in a brilliant, physical performance, is a character John Huston would have had to create if O'Conner hadn't already written him. Aggressive and hissing like an angry cobra, Motes slithers his way into town from a stint in the army and begins yelling about a "Church Without Christ" that he will begin. He finds a believer in the young, brainless Enoch Emory (Dan Shor) who tells Hazel about the "wise blood" in his veins that tells him things no one else can hear.

Continue reading: Wise Blood Review

Humboldt County Review


Weak
Writer-directors Danny Jacobs and Darren Grodsky cite Bob Rafelson's Five Easy Pieces as a major inspiration behind their debut feature Humboldt County. Indeed, both films involve lost young men who feel alienated from their fathers, and who find themselves on a soul-searching road trip in which they confront their innermost insecurities. But beneath these cosmetic similarities, Humboldt County is less the raw and daring cinema in the vein of Five Easy Pieces, and more just another Sundance-friendly "indie" flick, a slightly more off-kilter version of, say, Garden State.

Like the mentally-stunted protagonist of Garden State, we have Peter, Humboldt County's med school flunkie. Jeremy Strong's performance as Peter gives Zach Braff's in Garden State a run for its money for its sheer criminal blandness. Strong plays Peter as a cipher, wavering between the emotional blankness of a borderline catatonic and the comic dithering of a nebbish. Peter's identity has been neutered by a domineering father (Peter Bogdanovich), a UCLA medical professor who one day tells his underperforming son, who's also his student, that he's going to flunk him.

Continue reading: Humboldt County Review

Halloween (2007) Review


Good
Halloween's Michael Myers has seen many incarnations during his 29-year reign of terror. While he hasn't yet seen the vastness of space (boldly not going where most horror franchises eventually go), he has met a similar fate -- the remake. Although the majority of horror moviegoers are just looking for the next gore-fest, true horror fans are as rabid as Christians looking to crucify the latest blasphemously-filmed story of Christ. Luckily, director Rob Zombie is a member of the horror genre cult and treats his Halloween remake with the utmost respect, while amping up the intensity for a post-Saw audience.

From the 90-minute Abercrombie and Fitch ad that was 2003's Texas Chainsaw Massacre to the abysmal The Hills Have Eyes in 2006, classic horror films have been turned into exploitive, empty filler for the benefit of the box office. Zombie, on the other hand, explores the mythology of the original Halloween by psychologically deconstructing Michael Myers, instead of exploiting the original idea of "The Shape" -- the personified evil of the original. Zombie's film opens with the Myers family; of course, this is a Zombie film, so they are a white trash, long haired clan whose cursing would put sailors to shame. In this Halloween outing, we see Myers' transformation into the infamous serial killer.

Continue reading: Halloween (2007) Review

The Lord Of The Rings: The Two Towers Review


Very Good
Need I provide a pithy introduction to The Two Towers, the second installment in The Lord of the Rings trilogy? It's more hobbits, orcs, swords, and sorcery, so if you sawThe Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring (and why would you be reading this if you hadn't?), you know what to expect.

And it's expectations that director Peter Jackson has clearly found himself having to address in this movie. Given that all three films in the series were shot simultaneously, Jackson doesn't have much opportunity to introduce new stuff with each movie. We're well familiarized with the main characters and the primary settings, so much of the weight falls on the new people and creatures introduced in this episode to carry the story.

Continue reading: The Lord Of The Rings: The Two Towers Review

Bride Of Chucky Review


OK
Child's Play spoofs itself with this very tongue-in-cheek installment of the "Chucky" series. Standing out in more ways than one (ahem) is Jennifer Tilly as Chucky's love interest -- first as the human that brings him back from the dead, then as the doll that Chucky forces her soul into. Plenty of "witty" repartee among the cast, with none of the guilt that you're watching a serious attempt at making a horror flick.

The Exorcist III Review


Excellent
Yeah, I know. It's a horror movie with a number after the title, which usually as promising a signal as "This film was not screened for critics." Well, if Evil Dead II is the horror sequel's Citizen Kane, then Exorcist III is its The Godfather.

Burdened with a disastrous prior sequel, E3 effectively rescues the franchise with earnest terror and dark wit. Writer and director William Peter Blatty, the man who scribed the novel and screenplay to the original Exorcist, completely ignores the heresy that was Exorcist II: The Heretic, and picks up 15 years after the first installment with a story loaded with dastardly twists, dreadful things that lurk just off-screen, and Brad Dourif.

Continue reading: The Exorcist III Review

Seed Of Chucky Review


Very Good
Just when you thought puppets couldn't kill and screw any more than they did in Team America: World Police, along comes Seed of Chucky, the fifth film in the Child's Play series. Giving the South Park creators an inch-long wooden bird by stealing the market for weird puppet comedies, Seed of Chucky steals the show as the new king of all puppet comedies and leaves no envelope unpushed, no bad joke avoided, and no pop star alive.

The classic campfest that is Seed of Chucky begins as any movie with "Seed of" in the title should... by having one of the weirdest credit sequences featuring doll sperm flying into an egg and watching a small doll gestate, complete with umbilical cord and "Made in Japan" stamp.

Continue reading: Seed Of Chucky Review

The Wild Blue Yonder Review


Excellent
Werner Herzog, one of the most consistently fascinating documentarians in recent years, takes his recent non-fiction work and slices and dices it together with his gift for traditional narrative. Well, in the case of The Wild Blue Yonder, it's far from traditional. It is, however, one of the most fascinating examples of feature filmmaking I've seen in awhile.

The plot is really quite simple: An alien (Brad Dourif) from Andromeda narrates his tale to the camera, for posterity. He's one of the few remaining members of his kind, having survived the arduous travel from his planet to Earth, which seemed the best place to land after his planet began to die. Unfortunately, the Andromedans don't get what they were planning on: Earth's era of greatness is now past, and it doesn't seem much better than the planet they just left. In fact, Earth is now dying as well, which has spurned the earthlings to search for a new planet of their own. Naturally, they find, and land on, Andromeda.

Continue reading: The Wild Blue Yonder Review

Ragtime Review


Good
The late 1970s and early 1980s were heavy times for cinema. This was the era of the majestic miniseries: Roots, Rich Man Poor Man, The Thorn Birds, Shogun. Why, if your film couldn't stretch over at least four hours, it probably wasn't worth telling.

The miniseries mentality reached into the theatrical world as well. And so Milos Forman ended up with Ragtime, a sprawling book about American life in the early 1900s, filled with stories of racism, sudden upward mobility, abandonment, psychosis, and of course that good old ragtime music. The result is a film that sprawls well over two hours yet can't ever decide where the best story lies. Is it a tale of a murderous husband who avenges the harsh treatment of his former-chorus girl wife? The story of an abandoned black baby who winds up in the arms of a wealthy white family? No, Ragtime eventually focuses on a black piano player (Howard E. Rollins Jr.) who rises through the ranks of the ragtime scene, only to find bitter racism and resentment waiting for him on the other side. He ultimately winds up holed up in a library with one of the characters from another story in the film. Some of this is based on real events, most is not.

Continue reading: Ragtime Review

Dune (1984) Review


Very Good
Did you know David Lynch at one time considered directing Return of the Jedi? Legions of George Lucas fans are probably delighted that he never got the shot, because for better or for worse (probably for worse) it might have turned out like the bizarre sci-fi experiment Dune. I've sometimes been accused of defending Lynch even when he's not working at his best. That's clearly the case here, resulting in a compromised megabudget effort where Lynch attempts to indulge his graphic art sensibility and please a mass audience at the same time. It just doesn't fly.

But Lynch fans might find stuff to enjoy in Dune anyhow. After all, there's a floating bug monster that parlays with Jose Ferrer's space emperor in the early going, flanked by legions of somnambulant slaves in black raincoats that probably inspired the villains in Dark City. This is followed by Kenneth MacMillan's puss-faced Baron Harkonnen floating around on wires, plucking out the heart of an angel-faced boy-toy (who was planting Blue Velvet-style pastel flowers only moments earlier), and sharing some homo-erotic blubbering with his nephew Feyd (played by Sting, who can't act but lends the film his charismatic rock star presence). Even when the plot is difficult to follow -- some nonsense involving a trade war over different planets that all made sense in Frank Herbert's original novel -- there's enough giddy comic book theatrics to keep Dune interesting as it meanders along for nearly three hours.

Continue reading: Dune (1984) Review

Eyes Of Laura Mars Review


Good
Vaguely supernatural thrillers were a dime a dozen in the 1970s -- this one's about a controversial photographer (Faye Dunaway) who inexplicably begins having visions where she sees through the eyes of the local serial killer. Naturally she witnesses a bunch of murders, no one believes her, and soon he starts stalking her directly. While all eyes are on the creepy driver (Brad Dourif), any one of a half-dozen supporting actors could be The One. Absurd, yes, but it's got a certain '70s vibe that you usually only get from Gene Hackman and/or Clint Eastwood vehicles.

The Exorcist III Review


Very Good
So we're not talking about great art here. But pound for pound, this second sequel to The Exorcist is one of the most frightening movies ever made. Largely set in an old hospital, we find that Father Damien may very well be alive and kicking in the depths of the mental ward -- and possibly possessed by the devil and with the power to possess others at will to do his bidding outside the confines of the straightjacket.

Continue reading: The Exorcist III Review

Senseless Review


OK
Really a showcase for Wayans's physical comedy talents (which are prodigious), this silly comedy about a hard-working underpriviledged college guy who gains super senses thanks to an experimental drug, is as senseless as they come. Fun to watch at moments, though.

Hidden Agenda Review


Good
"You can't bring home the bacon until you kill the pig!" Brian Cox's firey performance is about the only thing worth noting in this -- yet another IRA vs. England drama, perhaps the most overdone genre of film out there. Taking place mostly in various back rooms and parlors, an investigation into the murder of an American civil rights attorney visiting Belfast exposes corruption in the government (shocker!), yadda yadda yadda. How high does the conspiracy go? Who cares? I just want some bacon.

Continue reading: Hidden Agenda Review

The Hazing Review


Good
Frat boys, sorority girls... tsk tsk. Has the legacy of Scooby-Doo not taught them anything about the perils of breaking into haunted mansions, stealing magical (and evil) books, murdering cult leaders, and getting naked?

Oh well. Their loss is our gain. The Hazing is a monumentally bad horror film, but it's so campy and absurdly gory you can't help but guiltily enjoy your 87-minute stay with it.

Continue reading: The Hazing Review

Bride Of Chucky Review


OK
Child's Play spoofs itself with this very tongue-in-cheek installment of the "Chucky" series. Standing out in more ways than one (ahem) is Jennifer Tilly as Chucky's love interest -- first as the human that brings him back from the dead, then as the doll that Chucky forces her soul into. Plenty of "witty" repartee among the cast, with none of the guilt that you're watching a serious attempt at making a horror flick.

Boogeymen Review


Good
Just when you think there are no new ideas in Hollywood comes a DVD like Boogeymen, which shakes up your expectations of the movies. With the promise of giving you "the greatest hits of horror," Boogeymen is a compilation of scenes from 17 horror movies, ostensibly the best-known bits of the movies' "boogeymen" doing their dirtiest work.

Some of these boogeymen are the real deal -- Leatherface (The Texas Chainsaw Massacre) at the end of the film, Freddy Krueger (A Nightmare on Elm Street) in his finest hour, Jason (Friday the 13th) chasing a towel-wrapped co-ed, Pinhead (Hellraiser) ripping apart some dude. These are memorable horror baddies who haunted us during our youth. Then there are scenes from Wishmaster, Leprechaun, The Guardian, and even The Dentist -- not only is it not scary, it's silly and insulting to the other villains (like Psycho's Norman Bates) in the lineup. The Puppetmaster? And The Ugly? I've never even heard of The Ugly.

Continue reading: Boogeymen Review

Child's Play Review


Very Good
Unabashedly, this is a bad horror film. But it succeeds in its badness, and it's actually quite watchable, and funny. Stolen wholesale from an episode of The Twilight Zone, Child's Play spawned a franchise that, 10 years later, is still going strong. Oy.

Shadow Hours Review


Terrible

In "Shadow Hours" -- a bottom-feeder shocksploitation flick full of vapid, infernal biblical metaphors -- writer-director Isaac Eaton expects the audience to identify with a worthless, weak-willed, reprobate recently out of rehab who abandons his gorgeous, loyal, pregnant wife to follow a rich stranger into a hellish fantasy version of L.A.'s seamy underbelly.

Balthazar Getty -- the poor man's Charlie Sheen -- stars as an grumpy skid row gas jockey working the graveyard shift when a mysterious slickster (Peter Weller) pulls up in a Porsche, dark sunglasses and a $2,000 suit. He's looking for some gritty, down-and-out soul to torture as a "research assistant" on a book, apparently about the joys of social malignancy.

Soon Weller is dragging our complaisant hero around to strip bars, drug dens, graphically depicted S&M dungeons and dingy basements where they bet on bloody bare-knuckle brawls. But even after finding himself utterly appalled by his experiences, Getty's pump attendant -- already sickened by daily exposure to the dregs of humanity at his ghetto gas station -- continues to ride shotgun for the mystery man night after night.

Continue reading: Shadow Hours Review

Brad Dourif

Brad Dourif Quick Links

News Pictures Video Film RSS
Advertisement

Occupation

Actor


Brad Dourif Movies

Priest Movie Review

Priest Movie Review

Bettany reteams with Legion director Stewart for another loud religious-themed action movie. But the po-faced...

Priests Trailer

Priests Trailer

In an alternate world, the earth looks like a very different place, its land ruined...

My Son, My Son, What Have Ye Done Movie Review

My Son, My Son, What Have Ye Done Movie Review

There's no way that combining the geniuses of producer David Lynch and director Werner Herzog...

The Bad Lieutenant - Port of Call: New Orleans Movie Review

The Bad Lieutenant - Port of Call: New Orleans Movie Review

A loose remake of Abel Ferrara's 1992 immorality tale, this film becomes bizarrely comical as...

The Bad Lieutenant: Port Of Call New Orleans Trailer

The Bad Lieutenant: Port Of Call New Orleans Trailer

Terrence McDonagh is a cop who's not really known for his courageous acts but when...

Humboldt County Movie Review

Humboldt County Movie Review

Writer-directors Danny Jacobs and Darren Grodsky cite Bob Rafelson's Five Easy Pieces as a major...

Halloween (2007) Movie Review

Halloween (2007) Movie Review

Halloween's Michael Myers has seen many incarnations during his 29-year reign of terror. While he...

The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers Movie Review

The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers Movie Review

Need I provide a pithy introduction to The Two Towers, the second installment in The...

Seed of Chucky Movie Review

Seed of Chucky Movie Review

Just when you thought puppets couldn't kill and screw any more than they did in...

Artists
Actors
    Filmmakers
      Artists
      Bands
        Musicians
          Artists
          Celebrities
             
              Artists
              Interviews
                musicians & bands in the news
                  actors & filmmakers in the news
                    celebrities in the news

                      Go Back in Time using our News archive to see what happened on a particular day in the past.