Bonnie Arnold

Bonnie Arnold

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Women In Film Pre-Oscar Cocktail Party

Bonnie Arnold - Women In Film Pre-Oscar Cocktail Party at Hyde Sunset Kitchen + Cocktails - Los Angeles, California, United States - Friday 20th February 2015

Bonnie Arnold
Bonnie Arnold
Bonnie Arnold

Producers Guild of America's 26th Annual Producers Guild Awards

Kit Harrington, Dean DeBlois, America Ferrera and Bonnie Arnold - A variety of stars were photographed on the red carpet as they attended the Producers Guild of America's 26th Awards ceremony which was held at Hyatt Regency Century Plaza in Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 24th January 2015

Dean DeBlois, Bonnie Arnold and Kit Harrington
Dean DeBlois, Bonnie Arnold and Kit Harrington

20th Annual Critics' Choice Movie Awards - Arrivals

Bonnie Arnold and Dean DeBlois - A host of stars were snapped as they attended the 20th Annual Critics' Choice Movie Awards which were held at the Hollywood Palladium in Los Angeles, California, United States - Thursday 15th January 2015

Bonnie Arnold and Dean DeBlois
Bonnie Arnold and Dean DeBlois

2014 National Board Of Review Gala

Producer Bonnie Arnold and director Dean DeBlois - 2014 National Board of Review Gala at Cipriani 42nd Street - Arrivals at Cipriani 42nd. - New York City, New York, United States - Tuesday 6th January 2015

The Hollywood Reporter's 23rd annual Women in Entertainment

Bonnie Arnold - The Hollywood Reporter's 23rd annual Women in Entertainment breakfast at Milk Studios - Arrivals at Milk Studios - Los Angeles, California, United States - Wednesday 10th December 2014

Bonnie Arnold
Bonnie Arnold

How to Train Your Dragon 2 Review


Essential

Bigger and even richer than the terrific 2010 hit animation, this sequel is also quite possibly the best action-adventure movie of the year. Not only are its big set-pieces thrillingly rendered with first-rate special effects, but the characters are complex and involving. And the script effortlessly combines jagged wit, youthful exuberance, heart-stopping romance and even some rather bleak emotions.

Five years have passed since Hiccup (voiced by Jay Baruchel) discovered his ability to interact with dragons, specifically his inseparable pal Toothless, bringing a new era of dragon-related fun to the small Viking island of Berk. But now his father Stoick (Gerard Butler) is talking about passing on the mantel of chief to Hiccup, and he's not sure he's ready for that. He'd much rather be out zooming over the ocean exploring uncharted lands. Then on one of his trips he encounters a group of dragon hunters led by Eret (Kit Harington), who is helping the notorious villain Drago (Djimon Hounsou) build an army. But this leads Hiccup to an even more startling discovery: his mother Valka (Cate Blanchett) turns out to be alive and running a secret sanctuary for dragons. Can they team up to stop Drago?

It's a rare film that manages to work equally well in the quiet moments as in the massive spectacle, but writer-director Dean DeBlois never wobbles at all. Without ever manipulating the audience, he seamlessly shifts from tear-inducing happiness to soaringly thrilling battle action to agonising emotional pain. The coming-of-age plot may feel familiar, but it's packed with fresh touches, hilarious observations and some surprising twists and turns along the way.

Continue reading: How to Train Your Dragon 2 Review

How to Train Your Dragon Review


Excellent
A winning combination of vivid imagery, snappy writing and a strong narrative lifts this far above most animated features. And it also has a surprisingly effective message woven into the comedy and action.

In an isolated Viking village, vicious attacks by fire-breathing dragons are standard, so naturally the villagers grow up to be dragon-slayers. The exception is Hiccup (Baruchel), a geeky teen who simply can't think inside the box, as it were. His annoyed tough-guy father Stoick (Butler) reluctantly allows Hiccup to train at the dragon-fighting school run by Gobber (Ferguson).

Hiccup is only interested because the sexy Astrid (Ferrera) is the top student.

Continue reading: How to Train Your Dragon Review

The Last Station Review


OK
A double love story based on real events from the life of Leo Tolstoy, this period film combines comedy and emotion in a way that's always entertaining, even if it sometimes feels camp and contrived.

Valentin (McAvoy) is a young Tolstoyan in 1910 assigned by the movement's leader Chertkov (Giamatti) to keep an eye on Leo Tolstoy (Plummer) and his sceptical wife Sofya (Mirren). But what Valentin finds is a lively, loving marriage that's strong enough to include opposing views. This isn't good enough for Chertkov, who moves to get Leo to change his will to leave everything to the movement. Which of course enrages Sofya. Meanwhile, Valentin is experiencing his first flush of love with a Tolstoyan commune resident (Condon).

Continue reading: The Last Station Review

Toy Story Review


Extraordinary
The wizards at Pixar and Disney have created a film that is unlikely to be forgotten in the next few years. Toy Story, the first completely computer-animated movie ever, is fresh and funny, and it takes the state of animation to a heretofore undreamed-of level.

Sheriff Woody (Tom Hanks) is the leader of a group of toys who come alive when no one is watching. Owned by young Andy (John Morris), they find new toy Buzz Lightyear (Tim Allen) thrown into the mix, and when Woody's insecurity causes him to try almost anything to get Buzz out of the picture, he almost succeeds with catastrophic effects. Soon, both Woody and Buzz find themselves captives in the next-door home of toy molester Sid (Erik von Detten). Not only must they get out of Sid's place, but the family's moving day is nigh, and no one wants to be left behind.

Continue reading: Toy Story Review

Over the Hedge Review


OK
Audiences who peek Over the Hedge at DreamWorks' latest creation are destined to find a homogenized animated feature that's as polished as the pop-up suburban neighborhood that houses the bulk of the action. Blessed with beautiful visuals, Hedge furthers the notion that animation remains the only genre capable of improving in quality quite literally from film to film. Too bad the top-notch art is married to a standard comedy script that's instantly forgettable.

R.J. (Bruce Willis) is a smooth-talking raccoon who lands in hot water when he tries to steal food from a hibernating bear (Nick Nolte). To spare his life, R.J. now has one week to recover a red wagon full of junk food or meet a grizzly fate. Lo and behold, the quick-thinking con artist crashes into a family of foraging beasts as they arise from their winter slumber. Led by neurotic turtle Verne (voiced by neurotic Garry Shandling), the animals invade the pop-up planned community that surfaced while they slept and begin to rummage for sweet treats.

Continue reading: Over the Hedge Review

Toy Story Review


Extraordinary
The wizards at Pixar and Disney have created a film that is unlikely to be forgotten in the next few years. Toy Story, the first completely computer-animated movie ever, is fresh and funny, and it takes the state of animation to a heretofore undreamed-of level.

Sheriff Woody (Tom Hanks) is the leader of a group of toys who come alive when no one is watching. Owned by young Andy (John Morris), they find new toy Buzz Lightyear (Tim Allen) thrown into the mix, and when Woody's insecurity causes him to try almost anything to get Buzz out of the picture, he almost succeeds with catastrophic effects. Soon, both Woody and Buzz find themselves captives in the next-door home of toy molester Sid (Erik von Detten). Not only must they get out of Sid's place, but the family's moving day is nigh, and no one wants to be left behind.

Continue reading: Toy Story Review

Tarzan (1999) Review


Good
Tarzan the Ape Man gets the Disney treatment this year. For some classic characters (Snow White, Bambi), the transition has been a positive one. For others (Pocahontas), it's been a disaster. Thankfully, Tarzan is among the former group.

The last time we saw Tarzan, he was saving a Lost City in the worst film of 1998 (shockingly titled Tarzan and the Lost City). The story is a bit more traditional this time, with Tarzan adopted by gorillas after his human parents are killed by a leopard. When he grows up, a group of British explorers stumble upon him, and after the "You Tarzan, me Jane" exchange, the British bad guy, Clayton, decides he's going to take all the gorillas back to Britain for sale. Adventure ensues, along with a love story and singing.

Continue reading: Tarzan (1999) Review

Bonnie Arnold

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