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Earl and the Dying Girl Trailer


High school can be the worst time for some people, and for Greg Gaines (Thomas Mann), it turned out to be especially horrible. His parents inform him that his classmate, Rachel Kushner (Olivia Cooke), has been diagnosed with leukemia. The two make a fast friendship out of a mutual intention to not be sympathetic, but that plan doesn't work out as well as planned. Greg and his best friend Earl make 'bad films' in their spare time, and decide to devote a film to Rachel. Unfortunately, as they specialise in bad films, they struggle to make something that will truly honour her and cheer her up.

Continue: Earl and the Dying Girl Trailer

Cloudy With A Chance Of Meatballs Trailer


Watch the trailer for Cloudy With A Chance Of Meatballs

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The Premiere Of 'Ben 10: Alien Swarm' Held At Warner Bros. Studios

Bobb'e J. Thompson - Bobb'e J Thompson Burbank, California - The Premiere of 'Ben 10: Alien Swarm' held at Warner Bros. Studios Wednesday 18th November 2009

Bobb'e J. Thompson
Bobb'e J. Thompson

Cloudy With A Chance Of Meatballs Review


Excellent

Like a comically deranged Twilight Zone episode, this colourful animated feature underscores its fantastical story with some intriguingly serious issues. But it never gets preachy, and a stream of warped humour will keep adults chuckling all the way through.

Geeky inventor Flint (voiced by Hader) has finally created something that will make him famous: a machine that makes food from water. When it's inadvertently catapulted into the clouds, it starts raining cheeseburgers, much to everyone's delight. Now famous, he remotely programmes the machine to rain everything from ice cream to spaghetti and meatballs. While Flint's mono-browed dad (Caan) doesn't really get him, the greedy mayor (Campbell) wants a piece of his success. Meanwhile, Flint meets weather reporter Sam (Faris), who might actually understand him.

Filmmakers Lord and Miller somehow manage to keep the film utterly silly, with outrageous visual flourishes and zany comical asides, while maintaining a sharp intelligence beneath the surface. As a result, grown-ups will probably find the film funnier than kids, who will be entranced by the visual antics and miss the sophisticated wit. And they quietly hide the serious subtext as well, including a knowing look at celebrity and pointed comments on how tricky it is for people to truly communicate.

But all of this is mere icing on the cake, as it were, for a film that's raucous, nonstop fun. Images of food falling from the sky are pure dreamlike fantasy, especially when Flint's machine overheats and produces oversized culinary delights that look utterly delicious even as they flatten the houses they land on. Of course, this gives the screenwriters plenty of running gags and punning opportunities, which the talented vocal cast run wild with.

Even side characters like Mr T's supercop and Bratt's Guatemalan cameraman get terrific moments along the way, while Flint's relationship with his dad has a surprising resonance. And along the way, there are some superb sequences that combine goofy humour with awkward emotion plus a hint of unhinged weirdness (such as the Jell-O palace). And as global chaos threatens to erupt, along with Mt Leftovers, the film develops into a hysterical disaster movie satire that's brilliantly animated and, for once, makes full use of 3D to throw everything right into our faces.

Imagine That Review


Grim
Undemanding audiences may warm to the strong cast and crew of this family comedy, even though it's yet another example of a movie that's had all the life sucked out of it by the Hollywood studio system. In the end it isn't very funny, clever or engaging.

Evan (Murphy) is a high-flying financial executive who's not as attentive to his perky daughter Olivia (Shahidi) as he should be. Sharing custody with his ex (Parker), he only barely hears what Olivia says, and is shocked to discover that her imaginary friends are giving sound investment advice. So he starts using their tips at work, which both improves his job prospects and his relationship with Olivia. But this comes undone when his boss (Cox) offers a prime promotion to either him or his smarmy office rival (Church).

Continue reading: Imagine That Review

Land Of The Lost Review


Weak
Although you can see the filmmakers trying to pay homage to Sid & Marty Krofft's nutty 1970s TV series, this film is just too random and silly to make any sense at all. Although there are a few laughs along the way.

After a humiliating appearance on TV, Dr Rick Marshall (Ferrell) continues with his research into time travel, seeking a parallel dimension where past, present and future all mix together. The missing ingredient turns out to be a sexy-brainy assistant, namely Holly (Friel), who urges him to test his invention. They're zapped into chaotic jungle-desert world along with the clueless Will (McBride). While looking for a way home, they team up with monkey-boy Cha-Ka (Taccone) and encounter a psycho T-rex and an army of lizard men.

Ferrell can do this kind of wackiness in his sleep; indeed, he often seems to be dozing off during this film as this food-obsessed, showtune-loving sketch comedy character. Fortunately, he's terrific at offhanded improv, making it feel utterly effortless. Friel and McBride must work a little harder opposite him, but both have hilarious moments along the way as the plucky scientist and up-for-anything chucklehead.

Around them, director Silberling blends first-rate effects and visually arresting images along with alien creatures who look like men in homemade costumes. This is obviously meant as a nod to the original TV show, but the strange mix is more of a distraction than a gag. And the whole film feels utterly random, like the script was loosely outlined by 10-year-old boys and then never fleshed out. It's essentially a bundle of silly set pieces punctuated by running gags about bodily fluids and Holly's breasts.

This parallel world has no internal logic, but neither does any single scene.

We don't really expect logic in a goofy movie like this, but is it too much to ask why Holly speaks fluent monkey-language only some of the time? And while there are plenty of amusing moments (the vampire mosquito, the T-rex pole vault), there's not a single big laugh. Or any real reason for this film to have been made, for that matter.

2009 BET Awards Held At The Shrine Auditorium - Arrivals

Bobb'e J. Thompson, Keke Palmer and Bet Awards - Bobb'e J. Thompson and Keke Palmer Los Angeles, California - 2009 BET Awards held at the Shrine Auditorium - Arrivals Sunday 28th June 2009

Bobb'e J. Thompson, Keke Palmer and Bet Awards
Bobb'e J. Thompson and Bet Awards
Bobb'e J. Thompson and Bet Awards
Bobb'e J. Thompson and Bet Awards
Bobb'e J. Thompson and Bet Awards
Bobb'e J. Thompson and Bet Awards

Role Models Review


OK
Role Models, David Wain's third feature as a director and co-writer, may be the first of the erstwhile The State member's films to actually feel fully-formed. Wain's first two films, Wet Hot American Summer and last year's The Ten, felt more like collections of sketches and improvisational quips left over from sessions with his cohorts in The State and Stella, his other cancelled sketch show, than classic, three-act-structured movies. These aren't necessarily bad qualities when dealing with humor. In fact, both The Ten and Wet Hot American Summer are much funnier overall than his latest, but the softening of content is traded for a comforting semblance of plot.

As with his past two efforts, Wain's latest is top-lined by the invaluable Paul Rudd, who also co-wrote the screenplay with Wain. He plays Danny, a spokesperson for Minotaur Energy Drink who spends his days telling teenagers not to do drugs with a fluffy Minotaur dancing behind him. Inside that jolly Minotaur costume is Wheeler (Seann William Scott), a co-worker who wants nothing more than to be Dan's friend and get laid. This comes as a surprise as it seems that Danny has no friends save for his girlfriend Beth (Elizabeth Banks), and even she is beginning to tire of his wasting-my-life hissy fits. It's when Beth breaks it off that Dan loses it and tells a cafeteria filled with teenagers how awesome drugs are and how life sucks. That's before he mounts the Minotaur Mobile upon a statue of a horse.

Continue reading: Role Models Review

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