Boaz Yakin

Boaz Yakin

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Max Trailer


Max played an important role as a working dog in the US military, but he is sent back from his service in Afghanistan following the traumatic loss of his beloved friend and handler, Kyle Wincott. He is brought into the care of the soldier's grieving family, but, frightened by the unfamiliar surroundings and suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder after his master's terrifying death in an explosion, Max proves to be difficult to integrate into regular society. However, it soon becomes clear that he wants to be loved again, and forms a heart-warming bond with his former owner's younger brother Justin as they each do their best to heal each other's broken hearts - and that means embarking on some rollicking adventures.

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Now You See Me Review


Good

The idea of magicians conducting a series of heists is a great one, but this under-developed film never quite seizes the opportunity. Even its terrific A-list cast can't make much of the lame plot. And director Leterrier is so enamoured with magic that he packs the film with whizzy digital trickery. Which completely misses the point.

At the centre are four illusionists: card trickster Daniel (Eisenberg), hypnotist Merrit (Harrelson), escapologist Henley (Fisher) and street magician Jack (Franco). They're summoned by a mysterious figure to team up for a series of elaborate performances funded by a wealthy benefactor (Caine). First up is a Las Vegas show that involves stealing millions of euros from a Paris bank and raining them down on the audience. This attracts the attention of FBI Agent Rhodes (Ruffalo) and Interpol's Dray (Laurent), who follow them to their next shows in New Orleans and New York. As does a notorious debunker (Freeman) determined to expose their secrets.

The film never quite gets the balance right, as we're not sure if we should root for these flashy young magicians or the people they're leading on a wild goose chase. But there's plenty of eye candy to keep us happy, as each whizzy stunt goes over-the-top to make us wonder what's really happening here. Everything this quartet does has an anarchist slant, stealing from the wealthy to help the needy, which adds a tinge of topicality. Although the gratuitous action scenes and ludicrous effects leave the film about as realistic as a Road Runner cartoon.

Continue reading: Now You See Me Review

Safe Review


Weak
Like a bullet to the head, this movie has no time for subtlety, charging through a series of violent shootouts that are strung together into one cacophonous, chaotic chase. It finally finds some humour in the final act, but by then it's too late to save us.

Ex-cop Luke (Statham) is working as a cage fighter when he runs afoul of the Russian mafia, because they lose millions stupidly betting against him.

Brutally hunted by the boss' son (Sikora), Luke is contemplating suicide when he spots little Mei (Chan) being chased by the Chinese mob. Suddenly kicking into gear, he rescues her and discovers that she's a numerical prodigy who has memorised an important sequence of numbers. But now the Russians, Chinese and a gang of rogue cops led by a New York police captain (Burke) are all after them.

Continue reading: Safe Review

Bombay Beach Review


Excellent
This startling documentary explores a part of America few even want to admit exists: a place designed as a paradise that has instead become an almost apocalyptic wasteland populated by people who have fallen out of society.

Bombay Beach is a community on the edge of the Salton Sea, just a two-hour drive from Los Angeles. But instead of a seaside holiday destination, it's now a collection of falling-down buildings and misfit residents living in the parched desert on the edge of a saltwater lake that's surrounded by dead fish.

Instead of approaching this journalistically, filmmaker Har'el explores the lives of three residents through beautifully shot and edited fly-on-the-wall footage.

Continue reading: Bombay Beach Review

Safe Trailer


Former elite agent Luke White lives in New York and is all too familiar with the city's seedy underbelly, which crawls with corrupt policemen, killers and gangsters. The policemen, along with the Russian mafia and the Triads, are all looking for New York's Most Wanted, who has memorised a very long safe combination that is of the utmost importance.

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Boaz Yakin Sunday 31st October 2010 Director Boaz Yakin on the set of Safe Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Boaz Yakin

Prince Of Persia: The Sands Of Time Review


Good
There are times during this film when it's plainly obvious that it was based on a videogame, with levels of action, magical tools and even a fair maiden to rescue. The result is a silly but enjoyable guilty pleasure.

Dastan (Gyllenhaal) is the adopted youngest son of Persian King Sharaman (Pickup). With his two brothers (Kebbell and Coyle) and their ambitious uncle (Kingsley) he invades the holy city of Alamut. But things go badly wrong, and Dastan ends up on the run with the local Princess Tamina (Arterton), bickering over a ceremonial dagger that turns out to have time-shifting properties. With the help of a local sheik (Molina), they return to the city and try to thwart a dark conspiracy to take over the kingdom.

Continue reading: Prince Of Persia: The Sands Of Time Review

Fresh Review


Weak
Acclaimed, but why? Fresh is the nickname of the prototypical urban street punk (Sean Nelson), who runs drugs for the local hoods when he isn't busy attending dogfights, witnessing murders, visiting his prostitute sister, or playing chess with his homeless father in the park. Presumably, we are meant to sympathize with Fresh because he's a chess player, and hence an intellectual, but when he launches his plan to turn the tables on his drug bosses, it's hard to rally behind him. Extremely disturbing and unnecessarily violent, Fresh plays like Spike Lee for Dummies.

The Punisher (1989) Review


Terrible
One of cinema's worst duds ever, Dolph Lundgren is actually at his mediocre best here as the Marvel Comics star -- a former policeman turned vigilante who is out to avenge the death of his wife and child. Things go from stupid to completely asinine when the Punisher decides to take on the local Japanese Yakuza mobsters, who have kidnapped the children of his usual enemies, the Italian mafia. Can't we all just get along? Not if it means sitting through this film, marred by cheeseball sets and special effects, lame fight sequences, and some of the worst acting ever to disgrace the screen. Director Mark Goldblatt returned to editing after this bomb.

Continue reading: The Punisher (1989) Review

A Price Above Rubies Review


Good
Ok. When I reviewed Kundun, I reached the conclusion that I needed the raw thrill of ripping a movie to shreads in my bare hands. As almost an answer to my prayers, a movie comes along that can do just that... well, kindof. I can't really rip A Price Above Rubies, since it wasn't actually a terrible movie. Instead it was a movie that is, in my modern apotheosis of a negative utopia, a rarity: a movie neither good nor bad, the place between substance and shadow that does not quite reside in The Twilight Zone.

So I am sitting down and now pondering which to write: the good review or the bad review, each a definite possibility, and the decision is reached: heads for good, tails for bad. But alas, the coins are upstairs and I am a lazy bum. So I guess I write option C: the mediocre review. The movie really wasn't either.

Continue reading: A Price Above Rubies Review

Dirty Dancing: Havana Nights Review


Bad
In the middle of the lousy Dirty Dancing: Havana Nights, Patrick Swayze makes an appearance as a hotel dance instructor. At first, I laughed like mad over this kitschy connection: Swayze! This was tremendous. Were more Dirty Dancing alumni going to appear? Was Cynthia Rhodes going to pop up as a chorus girl? Jennifer Grey as a lifeguard?

However, as a still agile Swayze danced with the new movie's star, Romola Garai, it dawned on me: The new movie needed Swayze, or rather his hunky heir. Part of what made the original Dirty Dancing so appealing was Swayze's presence. Physically, you couldn't take your eyes off him, and he had a cool, aloof sex appeal that set up good girl Grey to fall madly in love with him. And Grey did a masterful job falling for his charms, slowly and assuredly.

Continue reading: Dirty Dancing: Havana Nights Review

Boaz Yakin

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Boaz Yakin Movies

Max Trailer

Max Trailer

Max played an important role as a working dog in the US military, but he...

Now You See Me Movie Review

Now You See Me Movie Review

The idea of magicians conducting a series of heists is a great one, but this...

Safe Movie Review

Safe Movie Review

Like a bullet to the head, this movie has no time for subtlety, charging through...

Bombay Beach Movie Review

Bombay Beach Movie Review

This startling documentary explores a part of America few even want to admit exists: a...

Safe Trailer

Safe Trailer

Former elite agent Luke White lives in New York and is all too familiar with...

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Prince of Persia: The Sands of Time Movie Review

Prince of Persia: The Sands of Time Movie Review

There are times during this film when it's plainly obvious that it was based on...

Dirty Dancing: Havana Nights Movie Review

Dirty Dancing: Havana Nights Movie Review

In the middle of the lousy Dirty Dancing: Havana Nights, Patrick Swayze makes an appearance...

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