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Blythe Danner - New York City Ballet 2016 Spring Gala at the David H Koch Theater at Lincoln Center - New York, New York, United States - Wednesday 4th May 2016

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Blythe Danner

Blythe Danner - Blythe Danner arrives on a flight to Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) - Los Angeles, California, United States - Monday 21st December 2015

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Blythe Danner - 25th Annual Gotham Independent Film Awards - Outside Arrivals at Cipriani Wall St. - New York City, New York, United States - Monday 30th November 2015

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Blythe Danner

Blythe Danner - 25th annual Environmental Media Awards at Warner Brother Studios Lot - Arrivals at Warner Bros. Studios - Burbank, California, United States - Saturday 24th October 2015

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Gwyneth Paltrow, Blythe Danner and Guest
Gwyneth Paltrow and Blythe Danner
Gwyneth Paltrow and Blythe Danner
Gwyneth Paltrow and Blythe Danner

Blythe Danner - Celebrities attend 25th annual Environmental Media Awards at Warner Brother Studios Lot. at Warner Brother Studios Lot - Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 24th October 2015

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Blythe Danner, Gwyneth Paltrow and Debbie Levin
Blythe Danner, Gwyneth Paltrow and Debbie Levin

Blythe Danner , Bob Balaban - Hamptons International Film Festival - 'Truth' - Opening Night and Premiere at Guild Hall - East Hampton, New York, United States - Thursday 8th October 2015

Blythe Danner and Bob Balaban
Stuart Match Suna, Blythe Danner and Bob Balaban
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Blythe Danner - Special screening of 'I'll See you in My Dreams' held at the Tribeca Grand Screening Room - Arrivals at Tribeca Grand Screening Room - New York City, New York, United States - Monday 11th May 2015

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Blythe Danner
Andrew Karpen (ceo Bleecker Street), Blythe Danner, Sam Elliott, Rhea Perlman, Brett Haley (director) and Marc Basch (co-writer)

Donald Margulies, Eric Lange, Blythe Danner, Kate Jennings Grant, Daniel Sunjata and David Rasche - Photographs of a variety of stars as they arrived at the Manhattan Theatre Club Fall benefit which was held in The Appel Room at Jazz in the Lincoln Center's Fredrick P. Rose Hall in New York, New York, United States - Tuesday 11th November 2014

Donald Margulies, Eric Lange, Blythe Danner, Kate Jennings Grant, Daniel Sunjata and David Rasche
Donald Margulies

Blythe Danner - Stars arrived at the Hard Rock Cafe for the Country House After Party in New York, New York, United States - Friday 3rd October 2014

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Blythe Danner and Daniel Sunjata - The Country House Opening Night Curtain Call at Friedman Theatre, - New York, New York, United States - Friday 3rd October 2014

Blythe Danner and Daniel Sunjata
Sarah Steele, Eric Lange, Blythe Danner and Daniel Sunjata
Sarah Steele, Eric Lange and Blythe Danner
Kate Jennings Grant, Sarah Steele, Eric Lange, Blythe Danner, Daniel Sunjata and David Rasche
Sarah Steele, Eric Lange and Blythe Danner

Paul Review


Very Good
Packed with references to other films instead of original jokes, this goofy comedy at least keeps us laughing all the way through. The idea itself is hilarious, and the movie's assembled with skill and energy.

Graeme and Clive (Pegg and Frost) are sci-fi geeks who realise their dream to drive a Winnebago across the American Southwest visiting UFO hotspots to re-enact favourite movie and TV scenes. Then they stumble across an actual alien named Paul (voiced by Rogen as an Alf-style wisenheimer). They agree to help him get home, but are hotly pursued by a tenacious Man in Black (Bateman) and two X-Files agents (Hader and Lo Truglio). They are also joined by someone who's even more alien to them: devout one-eyed creationist Ruth (Wiig), who Paul calls a "God-bothering cyclops".

Continue reading: Paul Review

Little Fockers Review


Weak
While this second sequel to Meet the Parents features the same comedy of embarrassment and vulgarity as its predecessors, it also takes a strange sideways step into machismo that leaves it feeling rather joyless.

As their twins (Daisy Tahan and Colin Baiocchi) are about to turn 5, Greg and Pam Focker (Stiller and Polo) are planning a big birthday party involving both of their sets of parents. While Pam's intense dad Jack (De Niro) is pressuring Greg to be a family leader, her mom (Danner) tries to keep the peace.

Meanwhile, Greg's parents (Streisand and Hoffman) are on separate quests of their own. But it's Pam's ex Kevin (Wilson) who really stirs things up. As does a drug rep (Alba) who gets a bit too close to Greg.

Continue reading: Little Fockers Review

Paul Trailer


For the majority of their lives Graeme and Clive have been huge sci-fi geeks, and when the two Brits find an opportunity to take a road trip across America and visit Area 51, they can hardly contain their excitement. What the two friends weren't to know was that they were soon to have a new friend in the truck keeping them company; Paul.

Continue: Paul Trailer

Meet The Parents Little Fockers Trailer


Our favourite dysfunctional family returns to the screens once again in Meet The Parents Little Fockers. It's 10 years on since Greg and Jack first met, and after finally marrying his daughter and raising two children with her, Jack seems to finally be accepting Greg for who he is; however it doesn't seem Jack's ever going to be 100% happy with his son-in-law, when he finds out Greg is short on money and working for a drug company Jack becomes dubious about Greg and if he'll ever be a strong enough man to lead his family.

Continue: Meet The Parents Little Fockers Trailer

The Sisterhood Of The Traveling Pants 2 Review


Good
Sanaa Hamri's The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants 2 works perfectly as a soap opera squeezed into a feature-length package and dispensed to its (preferably female) teenage demographic. The four "sisters," now college-aged but still trading their magical blue jeans, reunite with alienated relatives, endure pregnancy scares, chase their dreams to exotic locales, and find crucial, emotional elements of themselves in the strangest of places. Like Vermont, for instance.

That doesn't mean, by any stretch, that this Sisterhood sequel offers a balanced moviegoing experience capable of entertaining the random ticket buyers who stumble in because The Dark Knight is sold out and don't know the difference between faded Levi's and the traveling pants of the title. Knowledge gleaned from the 2005 film is imperative, while familiarity with the four books in author Ann Brashares' Sisterhood series will only help.

Continue reading: The Sisterhood Of The Traveling Pants 2 Review

The X Files (1998) Review


Good
Little more than an expensive, flashy, and painfully drawn-out season finale, The X Files has little chance to draw any new fans to the TV show, if this is the best that can be done.

The movie opens with Agents Mulder (Duchovny) and Scully (Anderson) finding themselves on a new assignment after the closing of the X-files. Of course, through a bizarre coincidence, their very first assignment leads them to uncover a conspiracy involving the hiding of bodies of some would-be aliens. The plot turns alternately confusing and ridiculous after that.

Continue reading: The X Files (1998) Review

Alice (1990) Review


Very Good
Alice in Wonderland gets a Woody Allen update and makeover in this oddball story of a woman (Mia Farrow) who is stricken with a backache and seeks the advice of a Chinese herbalist/hypnotist, who diagnoses her with emotional problems instead. Soon she's hallucinating, invisibly eavesdropping, communicating with the dead, and otherwise curing herself, all while navigating the waters of her heart. Allen earned a screenwriting nomination, but Farrow is charming in her red hat, and William Hurt is memorable as her straying husband.

Stolen Review


Weak
Looks can be awfully deceiving. Harold J. Smith's face has a rubbery, off-putting look from a long-running case of skin cancer. This noted, Smith never seems the least bit self-conscious about his looks and it hasn't hindered his progress in becoming one of the more prolific art theft detectives in the world.

Rebecca Dreyfus' documentary on the infamous 1990 heist of 13 irreplaceable artworks has a story to tell. Amongst the 13 artworks is Vermeer's "The Concert," a priceless piece of art from a seminal artist who died young and only painted a little over 30 pieces. The heist, which took place at Boston's Isabella Stewart Gardner museum, is one of the few art robberies in U.S. history where none of the pieces have been recovered. With vigor, Dreyfus and her guileful gumshoe give it another crack.

Continue reading: Stolen Review

Sylvia Review


Weak
It's always difficult to portray the essence of a historical figure that stands out in the crowd. You either get an over-the-top epic story that nauseates, or a too-simple tale that paints known plot points by numbers without revealing any new subtleties. Sylvia is a case in the latter end of the spectrum, and while it showcases new talents of Gwyneth Paltrow that she doesn't normally get to show off, it leaves the viewer wanting a stronger emotional impact from the infamously suicidal poet.

Directed by Christine Jeffs, whose Rain was a poignant look at a young girl starting to realize her own form of beauty, Sylvia takes us through the tempestuous relationship between Sylvia Plath (Paltrow) and Ted Hughes (Daniel Craig). They meet, quickly mate, his philandering tendencies are revealed, he leaves, she kills herself. The end. Of course, all of this is public knowledge already, so the details of the travails would be what makes or breaks the film, and unfortunately more stock is put into getting the facts right than in creating much interest in them.

Continue reading: Sylvia Review

The Invisible Circus Review


Weak
If anyone's considering checking out The Invisible Circus thinking it's Cameron Diaz's latest feature, forget it. Diaz, a burst of sunshine and energy in this hopelessly bland movie, plays a small supporting role. The weight of the story instead leans on 20-year old Jordana Brewster, a square-jawed beauty who doesn't have the skills to bring this movie out of its disorganized, poorly paced funk.

The oddly titled film, adapted from Jennifer Egan's book, tells of Phoebe (Brewster), a mid-70s San Francisco teenager who is compelled to trace the European travel path of her sister Faith (Diaz), whose trip six years earlier apparently ended in her suicide.

Continue reading: The Invisible Circus Review

Meet The Fockers Review


OK
Will Teri Polo be remembered for any other movie aside from Meet the Parents and its sequel?

The answer is irrelevant and really doesn't matter at all. It's just something that struck me during one of the many lulls in the surprisingly uneven and marginally entertaining Meet the Fockers. Trust me: You'll have plenty of time to ponder this and other cinematic riddles when you're watching Fockers.

Continue reading: Meet The Fockers Review

Howl's Moving Castle Review


Very Good
Similar to Princess Mononoke and Spirited Away, Hayao Miyazaki's Howl's Moving Castle is a sumptuously illustrated fairy tale with a pro-environment and anti-war slant, though unlike those modern classics, the animé titan's latest suffers from a narrative confusion that bogs down its initially effervescent spirit. A gloriously animated fantasia blessed by familiar Miyazaki hallmarks - vibrant, ethereal artwork, whimsical creatures, a rural world in which mysticism and technology happily coexist - the film (being released in both subtitled and dubbed versions, the latter of which I saw) has a light aura of juvenile romanticism and a manic, tangible physicality that stands head and shoulders above anything previously crafted by the maestros at Japan's legendary Studio Ghibli (including Katsuhiro Otomo's recent Steamboy).

The story of a young girl who, after being changed into an elderly woman by an evil witch, joins forces with a petulant playboy wizard against a nefarious sorcerer, Howl's is akin to a cluttered, cacophonous childhood dream come to life. However, as with dreams, Miyazaki's film is also far-too-often a bewildering jumble of intriguing ideas and ingenious images that never fully coalesce into a moving or compelling whole.

Continue reading: Howl's Moving Castle Review

The X Files Review


Good
Little more than an expensive, flashy, and painfully drawn-out season finale, The X Files has little chance to draw any new fans to the TV show, if this is the best that can be done.

The movie opens with Agents Mulder (Duchovny) and Scully (Anderson) finding themselves on a new assignment after the closing of the X-files. Of course, through a bizarre coincidence, their very first assignment leads them to uncover a conspiracy involving the hiding of bodies of some would-be aliens. The plot turns alternately confusing and ridiculous after that.

Continue reading: The X Files Review

The Great Santini Review


Excellent
An exceptional film, this odd combination of Top Gun and Ordinary People features Robert Duvall in one of his greatest performances (Oscar-nominated, too) as the difficult Marine family patriarch in the years leading up to the Vietnam War. This ain't Major Dad, as Duvall's "Great Santini" drinks hard and pushes his kids to the limit. Or beyond. Some of it's funny, some of its tragic, and with the exception of a misfired subplot about race relations, all of it's stellar.

Meet The Parents Review


Extraordinary
Pity poor Greg Focker. Not only is the man employed as a male nurse with an unfortunate name, but he's about to meet his girlfriend's parents in order to ask dad for her hand in marriage. Only dad is about as humorless as, say, Robert De Niro. And poor Greg can't do anything right to save his skin.

It all reminds me, with flashback-like intensity, of meeting my own father-in-law-to-be, a guy so stern he makes De Niro look like Jim Carrey. Picture Ben Stiller as Focker (or me) and De Niro as himself, and, like magic, you've got yourself one hell of a comedy that will see few equals this year or any other. (Note to Dr. Carder: This is just a joke that I know you'll laugh about because we have such a great relationship! See you this Christmas!!!)

Continue reading: Meet The Parents Review

Hearts Of The West Review


Very Good
An Iowa farmboy (Jeff Bridges) heads to Hollywood -- not to become a movie star, but to "attend" a correspondence school for writers. Perennially unclear on the concept, he ends up in the movies anyway, playing a stuntman and cowboy in Western genre pictures while trying to make it as a writer of "western prose." Very, very strange and self-referential, a really unique piece of cinema, though it tends to bog down after the umpteenth scene exposes Bridges' bumpkin-ness.

The Love Letter Review


Bad
Can romantic comedy get any worse than this? A mysterious love letter makes its cliched rounds of a New England town, and everyone thinks everyone else is in love with them. The centerpiece affair: A May-December romance between Scott and a ghoulish Capshaw. Embarrassing to watch.

Howl's Moving Castle Review


Excellent
Hayao Miyazaki's new film "Howl's Moving Castle"is so good that it shames virtually every animated film made since Miyazaki'slast, "SpiritedAway," graced movie screens in 2002.

If nothing else, it proves to Hollywood that its recentfailure in the animated realm comes not from old-fashioned hand-drawn animationbut from its severe lack of imagination and over-reliance on fart jokesand pop culture references.

The first of Miyazaki's films to be based on a book, "Howl'sMoving Castle" quickly establishes itself with the director's personalsignature, bursting with enough ideas and imagination to make up half adozen summer movies.

It begins, as most of his stories do, with a shy younggirl, Sophie (voiced for this English-language version by Emily Mortimer).She works in a hat shop and humbly watches as life passes her by. But oneday a handsome fellow -- whom she will come to know as Master Howl (voicedby Christian Bale) -- rescues her from an alleyway altercation and accidentallysteers her into all-new problems, involving several ghostly, globular thingswearing porkpie hats.

Continue reading: Howl's Moving Castle Review

Forces Of Nature Review


OK

I just can't figure out what I think about "Forcesof Nature."

The most stylistically creative romantic comedy in recentmemory, at times it's downright experimental with, for instance, two computer-enhancedstorm scenes in which raindrops fall in slow motion while everything elseruns at normal speed.

The film has a distinctive look, with bold photography,unblushing close-ups and a potent, tropical color palette. And Sandra Bullockgives the best performance of her career as an droll, carpe diemkind of girl, living life by the seat of her pants as a way of denyingher damaged-goods background of hard knocks that she can't seem to shake.

Continue reading: Forces Of Nature Review

Sylvia Review


Weak

An appropriately moody, gray and madly passionate ode to misery-embracing, famously suicidal author and poetess Sylvia Plath, the biographical "Sylvia" nonetheless paints a very incomplete picture of its subject's life. In fact, it doesn't have much to offer anyone who isn't already well versed in Plath lore.

With only a few scattered, out-of-context quotes from her works (the film went ahead despite disapproval and refusals from the Plath estate), the film provides little sense of her emotionally blistering talent, instead relying on the appraisals of peers. "The wealth of imagery," one friend exalts. "Such horrors but expressed with such coolness."

With its awkward sense of time passage, the storytelling sometimes feels like Cliffs Notes. In one comprehensive segment Plath (Gwyneth Paltrow) and husband Ted Hughes (Daniel Craig) move from England to Boston (where Plath's mom is played by Paltrow's mom, Blythe Danner), then live on the coast for a summer, become frustrated by writer's block, move back to England, become college lecturers, begin struggling with marital problems, and have a baby -- all in 1960. Then suddenly it's two or three years later and she's launching a book of poems ("The Colossus") without even a mention of her revitalized inspiration or a shot of her actually writing.

Continue reading: Sylvia Review

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Blythe Danner Movies

I'll See You In My Dreams Trailer

I'll See You In My Dreams Trailer

Old age is usually seen as a sad time to reflect on your life's work...

Detachment Movie Review

Detachment Movie Review

An almost overpowering sense of hopelessness makes this education-system drama difficult to watch. Fortunately, it's...

The Lucky One Movie Review

The Lucky One Movie Review

Zac Efron isn't a bad actor, but this kind of sappy movie will do nothing...

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Detachment Trailer

Detachment Trailer

Henry Barthes is a highly recommended substitute teacher, a compliment he doesn't really accept. His...

The Lucky One Trailer

The Lucky One Trailer

Logan Thibault is a US Marine Sergeant serving in Iraq on his third tour. One...

Paul Movie Review

Paul Movie Review

Packed with references to other films instead of original jokes, this goofy comedy at least...

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Little Fockers Movie Review

Little Fockers Movie Review

While this second sequel to Meet the Parents features the same comedy of embarrassment and...

Paul Trailer

Paul Trailer

For the majority of their lives Graeme and Clive have been huge sci-fi geeks, and...

Meet The Parents Little Fockers Trailer

Meet The Parents Little Fockers Trailer

Our favourite dysfunctional family returns to the screens once again in Meet The Parents Little...

The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants 2 Movie Review

The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants 2 Movie Review

Sanaa Hamri's The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants 2 works perfectly as a soap opera...

The Last Kiss (2006) Movie Review

The Last Kiss (2006) Movie Review

The catchy pop ballads found on the soundtrack for Tony Goldwyn's The Last Kiss will...

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