Billy Ray

Billy Ray

Billy Ray Quick Links

News Pictures Video Film Footage Quotes RSS

2015 MTV Video Music Awards Arrivals

Braison Cyrus, Noah Cyrus, Billy Ray Cyrus Tish Cyrus , Brandi Glenn Cyrus - Celebrities attend 2015 MTV Video Music Awards at Microsoft Theater. at Microsoft Theater - Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 30th August 2015

Billy Ray, Braison Cyrus, Noah Cyrus and Brandi Glenn Cyrus
Billy Ray, Braison Cyrus, Noah Cyrus and Brandi Glenn Cyrus

Secret In Their Eyes Trailer


Ray is a dedicated FBI investigator with a crush on his District Attorney supervisor Claire and a close friendship with his partner Jess. However, all those whimsical circumstances are thrown out of the window when a corpse is discovered in a dumpster in LA. Ray discovers that it's the mutilated body of Jess' teenage daughter, and the devastated pair set out on a vengeful mission to find the perpetrator. Unfortunately, the suspect they pick up - of whose guilt they are convinced - they are forced to let go when no solid evidence is found. Thirteen years later, Ray returns with a new lead, having spent every evening since searching through the US prison system for their murderer. But this time, they're thinking of bringing him down their own way.

Continue: Secret In Their Eyes Trailer

2014 Writers Guild Awards LA ceremony - Press Room

Billy Ray - WGA winners pose at 2014 Writers Guild Awards Press room at JW Marriott Los Angeles L.A. LIVE. - Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 1st February 2014

Billy Ray
Billy Ray
Billy Ray
Billy Ray
Billy Ray

Captain Phillips Review


Essential

With an attention to documentary detail that makes everything viscerally realistic, this film grabs hold and never lets go, cranking the suspense to nearly unbearable levels and then tightening its grip even further. Like director Greengrass' United 93, this is a film that makes us forget our daily routine, sending us on a harrowing journey that feels more like a life experience than watching a movie.

It's based on true events from March 2009, when Richard Phillips (Hanks) took a routine job captaining a cargo ship filled with food aid from Oman to Kenya. Then off the coast of Somalia, they're attacked by the tenacious pirate Muse (Abdi) and his three cohorts (Abdirahman, Ahmed and Ali). These aren't terrorists, they're desperate young men who take violent action only because they have to. But their demands for money go unmet, and the stand-off escalates as Phillips' crew fights back against the armed intruders. Then the American Navy responds with overwhelming force, trying to calm the situation without getting Phillips killed.

Aside from one background sequence in Somalia, we watch the entire story through Phillips' eyes, which makes us feel like we are right in the middle of it. Greengrass insists on realism, refusing to indulge in digital trickery when he can get real ships and helicopters out on the ocean instead. This gives the film a jolt of authenticity that's impossible to re-create in a studio, as we can feel the isolation of the expansive sea as well as the dangerous claustrophobia in the pod-like lifeboat where the climactic scenes play out. And there isn't a false note. Even with a well-known actor like Hanks in the central role, we are completely drawn in.

Continue reading: Captain Phillips Review

Video - Tom Hanks Admits 'Captain Phillips' Was 'Stressful' In Red Carpet Premiere Interview


The cast and crew of biopic thriller 'Captain Phillips' discuss the realistic nature of the heart-stopping flick on the red carpet at the US premiere. Among them were stars Tom Hanks, Faysal Ahmed and Barkhad Abdi, as well as director Paul Greengrass, producer Michael De Luca and screenwriter Billy Ray.

Continue: Video - Tom Hanks Admits 'Captain Phillips' Was 'Stressful' In Red Carpet Premiere Interview

PREMIERE OF COLUMBIA PICTURES CAPTAIN PHILLIPS

Billy Ray - Celebrities attend Premiere of Columbia Pictures "Captain Phillips" at The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. - Los Angeles, CA, United States - Monday 30th September 2013

Billy Ray and Stephen Bishop
Billy Ray and Stephen Bishop
Billy Ray and Stephen Bishop
Billy Ray and Stephen Bishop
Billy Ray

The Hunger Games Review


Excellent
Proclaimed "the next big franchise" before production even began, this first chapter of Suzanne Collins' trilogy manages to live up to the hype. It's rare to see a blockbuster with such a sharp political sensibility. And the actors are terrific in complex roles.

In what was once North America, the ruling class demands an annual sacrifice of the 12 districts that once rebelled: each must select two teens, a boy and a girl, to battle in a wooded arena to the death, with the last one standing crowned victor. In the poor mining District 12, the tributes are ace archer Katniss (Lawrence) and muscly baker Peeta (Hutcherson), who forge an awkward friendship as they're thrust into the televised competition. Trained by Haymitch (Harrelson), promoted by Effie (Banks), groomed by Cinna (Kravitz), interviewed by Caesar (Tucci) - it's simply overwhelming.

Continue reading: The Hunger Games Review

State of Play Review


OK
Big government getting in bed with corrupt private conglomerates. The fresh-faced Congressman hell-bent on bringing said scandal to light. The uncovered infidelity which threatens his power base, and the crumpled investigative journalist who must resolve his personal interest in the story with the legitimate needs of the press and his own corporate bosses. This should be the basis for a crackerjack thriller -- and it actually was when BBC scribe Paul Abbott crafted the six-episode series State of Play back in 2003. As with most successful foreign exports, Hollywood came calling, and now we have the big screen version starring Russell Crowe, Ben Affleck, and Helen Mirren. Instead of expanding the suspense, however, this ragtag, routine experience is effective, if perfunctory.

When the research assistant to brash young House member Stephen Collins (Affleck) dies in a mysterious accident, the press has a field day with the politician's possible adultery. Naturally, the Washington Globe and its crack staff, including reporter Cal McCaffrey (Crowe), blogger Della Frye (Rachel McAdams), and editor Cameron Lynne (Mirren), are exploring every angle. But there's a catch. You see, McCaffrey and Collins were college roommates, and they've maintained a strong friendship ever since. They've even shared the affections of the Congressman's current wife Anne (Robin Wright Penn).

Continue reading: State of Play Review

Breach Review


Good
Moving briskly from equivocator Stephen Glass to the chairman of the Benedict Arnold Fan Club, Robert Hanssen, director Billy Ray turns his tonal focus from Shattered Glass's journalistic felony to high crime in the intelligence agency. In what seems to be a new trend of cinematically capturing events before they have actually played out, Breach reenacts what is widely accepted as the greatest fracture of FBI security in the history of the organization.

Following possible terrorists and their contacts, Eric O'Neil (Ryan Phillipe) eagerly tries to discuss bureau protocol with his team, only to be ignored and have his well-prepared report on the subject shoved back in his face. That is, until he is dragged into a bureau conference room on a Sunday to meet with his superior and head agent Kate Burroughs (Laura Linney). It's here that O'Neil is asked to shadow Russian intelligence specialist Robert Hanssen (Chris Cooper) for what is originally agreed to be sexually perverse activities. It isn't till O'Neil is taken under wing by the intelligence expert that Burroughs reveals that Hanssen has actually been selling information to the Russians for some time and has cost the government billions of dollars and uncountable agent lives.

Continue reading: Breach Review

Hart's War Review


Extraordinary
I must admit I had preconceived notions regarding Hart's War. I was expecting to see a blood-and-guts WWII P.O.W. flick with Bruce Willis kicking Nazi butt, just like Audie Murphy. Instead, I was pleasantly surprised by this strange mixture of The Verdict and The Great Escape that delivers on all fronts, with a cunning script, great acting, and subtle directing.

The story resembles one of those studio pictures of the 1940s and 1950s made famous by the likes of William Holden and Gary Cooper. Willis plays Col. William McNamara, the highest-ranking officer in German prisoner camp Stalag IV during the tail end of the WWII. McNamara retains the dignity of his fellow American soldiers held captive and silently plans to strike back against the enemy under the suspicious eyes of German Col. Werner Visser (Marcel Iures). When a murder occurs in the camp, McNamara sets in motion a plan of attack against his German counterparts by orchestrating a court martial headed by Lt. Tommy Hart (Colin Farrell), an Army desk jockey with a senator for a father who was recently captured in Belgium. As the tensions mount and sides are taken, both friend and foe uncover duplicities within their own ranks, values of lives are weighed against the duties of soldiers, and the question of honor versus freedom plays out to the final whopper of an ending.

Continue reading: Hart's War Review

Shattered Glass Review


Good
The need to get the best story first has always been an inherent part of the news business. But when a journalist crosses the line into the realm of fictional the whole integrity of the news business is thrown out the window.

This is in essence what happened to The New Republic magazine in 1998 when a writer of theirs named Stephen Glass fabricated a story about a computer hacker to such an extent that nothing in it was true including - sorry to say - the allegation that the hacker left his mark with an appealingly humorous alliterative caption: "THE BIG BAD BIONIC BOY HAS BEEN HERE BABY." (This of course has been overshadowed by the recent Jayson Blair/New York Times scandal, which shook out nearly identically but with much greater fanfare earlier this year.)

Continue reading: Shattered Glass Review

Flightplan Review


OK
Here's a film that's guaranteed not to be playing as your in-flight movie any time soon.

The concept is a simple as they come: Distraught Kyle (Jodie Foster) loses her daughter on a jumbo jet. Where the hell could she have gone?

Continue reading: Flightplan Review

Volcano Review


Weak
Oh, there's nothing like a natural disaster to bring people together! That's the poorly masked theme ("They all look the same!") behind Volcano, the first really big disaster movie we've seen since, gosh, mid-February. It least this Volcanodoesn't blow -- figuratively speaking -- like Dante's Peak did, and that's mainly because it's so much more fun to watch Los Angeles be decimated by unceasing lava flow instead of a puny Pacific Northwest village.

Co-stars Anne Heche and Tommy Lee Jones prove more than able at evading not only the encroaching magma, but also the horde of bad actors that follow them throughout the movie. And while the film is full of creeping cheese, complete with death-defying leaps to safety, slow motion shots, and kitschy one-liners, I shock myself even by saying that, for the most part, it feels real. They even thought to include Dennis Woodruff's infamous car, the cheesiest of Hollywood landmarks, floating along in a river of fire. Where else would they think of that!? I really do love L.A...

Continue reading: Volcano Review

Billy Ray

Billy Ray Quick Links

News Pictures Video Film Footage Quotes RSS