Billy Boyd

Billy Boyd

Billy Boyd Quick Links

News Pictures Video Film Quotes RSS

Billy Boyd Amazed By The Technological Advancements Of ‘The Battle Of The Five Armies’ [Interview]


Also returning in a different aspect was Billy Boyd, who played the Hobbit, Pippin, in 'The Lord of The Rings' films. For 'The Battle of the Five Armies', he returned to write a song to cap off both the prequel trilogy, but also the series in its entirety. "I flew to New Zealand" he says, "wrote some songs and we're getting somewhere - and then I watched the film, and then it all made sense, and then the song came quite quickly after that." Boyd also echoes Serkis' amazement at the filming techniques of the modern day compared to the originally trilogy from nearly a decade ago. Both discuss the way that the CGI battles were put together for this final film, with Boyd explaining the set green screen set Jackson filmed on, by saying "He has the battle playing everywhere in this room.. through the camera! And to anyone looking, its an empty room, but looking through the camera, he has the whole battle!"

The final instalment in Peter Jackson's Middle Earth saga, 'The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies', opens in Europe on 10th December 2014, the UK on 11th December, and the US on 17th December.

"The Hobbit: The Battle Of The Five Armies" Los Angeles Premiere

Billy Boyd, Orlando Bloom and Elijah Wood - Photographs from the red carpet at the Los Angeles premiere of the third movie in the Hobbit trilogy "The Hobbit: The Battle Of The Five Armies" which was held at the Dolby Theatre in Hollywood, California, United States - Wednesday 10th December 2014

Billy Boyd
Billy Boyd
Billy Boyd
Billy Boyd, Orlando Bloom and Elijah Wood
Billy Boyd, Orlando Bloom and Elijah Wood

'The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies' Los Angeles premiere

Billy Boyd - Shots of the stars of the third in the Hobbit trilogy 'The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies'as they arrive at the Los Angeles premiere which was held at the Dolby Theater in Los Angeles, California, United States - Tuesday 9th December 2014

Billy Boyd

World Premiere of The Hobbit

Billy Boyd - Shots from the World Premiere of 'The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies' the final film in the trilogy as stars arrived at the Odeon Leicester Square in London, United Kingdom - Monday 1st December 2014

Billy Boyd

'The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies' world premiere

Billy Boyd - 'The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies' world premiere at the Empire Leicester Square cinema - Arrivals at Empire Leicester Square - London, United Kingdom - Monday 1st December 2014

'The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies' world premiere

Billy Boyd - 'The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies' world premiere - Arrivals - London, United Kingdom - Monday 1st December 2014

Billy Boyd
Billy Boyd
Billy Boyd
Billy Boyd
Billy Boyd

The Great Hip Hop Hoax Review


Excellent

Both engaging and eye-opening, this spirited documentary recounts an outrageous story with humour and honesty, revealing some nasty truths about the music industry in the process. The big issues are prejudice and greed, of course, but the film thankfully keeps its focus on a friendship that is pushed to the breaking point.

Billy Boyd and Gavin Bain first met in their hometown of Dundee in 2000, discovering that they had a mutual love of rap music as well as the talent to write and perform extremely catchy tunes. But record labels and performance venues just laughed in their faces: dismissing the mere idea of Scottish rappers. Then in a moment of frustration, they tell a London club that they're from Southern California, and suddenly everyone wants to hear more of their music. So they re-record their demo with American accents and create elaborate alter egos so they can convince everyone that Silibil n' Brains are partying L.A. skater dudes. Soon they have a big-time manager (Shalit) and a lucrative deal with Sony Records.

Filmmaker Finlay makes terrific use of Boyd and Bain's own video footage, capturing their crazy stunts and buoyant energy. We also see their skills as musicians in clips from their riotous performances. And we know that they have a bigger plan: to become superstars before they expose the hypocrisy in the music business. So it's fascinating to watch everything spiral out of their control. While living the high life and appearing all over the media, their debut album stubbornly refuses to come together, delayed even further when Sony goes through a restructuring. And it isn't easy living 24 hours a day as a fictional character.

Continue reading: The Great Hip Hop Hoax Review

The Great Hip Hop Hoax Trailer


When Gavin Bain and Billy Boyd first showed up on stage at London club Madame Jojo's, they had no idea that it would be the beginning of a downward spiral in their lives. After jetting over from Dundee and having previously suffered significant ridicule for their rap talents coupled with their strong Scottish accents, they decided to give themselves a whole new identity; they became Silibil N' Brains from California. Keeping up the American persona was surprisingly easy and they made such an impression that they eventually became signed with Sony records. However, touring and hanging out in VIP bars was one thing, releasing an album and having all their Scottish peers uncover the ruse was another. Eventually, though, they no longer had to worry about it as suspicion arose and they were caught out. The toll it took on their lives and relationship in the aftermath was disastrous, but the pair are set to make a more honest return with the release of a brand new album.

Continue: The Great Hip Hop Hoax Trailer

Ecstasy Trailer


Lloyd lives the good life: he goes clubbing almost every night, is surrounded by beautiful girls and takes ecstasy almost religiously. While Lloyd may act like a twenty something, he is really in his thirties. And he doesn't live in a bachelor pad; he lives with his alcoholic father, who he doesn't get along with.

Continue: Ecstasy Trailer

Pimp Review


Weak
There's a lurid atmosphere to this low-budget film that efficiently plunges us into a place that's almost overwhelmingly seedy. But the filmmakers fudge their faux doc structure and don't create a single character we care about.

A documentary crew is spending a week with low-life pimp Woody (Cavanah) on the streets of London, but what begins as an average series of events soon spirals into something much more sinister as Woody tries to protect his favourite hooker Bo (Chan) from the Chinese mafia while being pressured by his gangster boss (Dyer). Woody's life is full of movers and shakers, all buzzing around on their own specific errands, just like he is. Surely one of them knows what happened to a Ukrainian prostitute who has gone missing.

Continue reading: Pimp Review

The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers Review


Good
Need I provide a pithy introduction to The Two Towers, the second installment in The Lord of the Rings trilogy? It's more hobbits, orcs, swords, and sorcery, so if you sawThe Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring (and why would you be reading this if you hadn't?), you know what to expect.

And it's expectations that director Peter Jackson has clearly found himself having to address in this movie. Given that all three films in the series were shot simultaneously, Jackson doesn't have much opportunity to introduce new stuff with each movie. We're well familiarized with the main characters and the primary settings, so much of the weight falls on the new people and creatures introduced in this episode to carry the story.

Continue reading: The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers Review

The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring Review


Good
You think Harry Potter had expectations? It's a beloved book, sure, but it was published in 1997. In 10 years it will be as forgotten as The Bridges of Madison County. But J.R.R. Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings series dates all the way back to 1937 (when The Hobbit was published), and it's taken all these decades for someone to even attempt a live-action recreation of the trilogy of books. And not without reason.

How do you satisfy a legion of fans, some of whom have been waiting almost 65 years to see their absolute favorite work of literature put to film? More often than not, you don't, and though Peter Jackson's production of The Lord of the Rings is painstakingly faithful and earnest, it is almost a foregone conclusion that the movie will never quite be good enough for the obsessed fans (see also the 1978 animated Lord), just is it will be far too obtuse for those who haven't read the books.

Continue reading: The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring Review

The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King Review


Excellent
Peter Jackson returns with his third and final installment in The Lord of the Rings trilogy with the explosive - and exhausting - conclusion to his acclaimed series. Let's cut to the chase: Jackson's final entry is the best of the series, largely thanks to his pushing the boundaries of digital effects to their very limits.

Picking up after a flashback to Sméagol/Gollum's discovery of the ring many years earlier, the film then takes us back to the twin stories from Fellowship andThe Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers: Gandalf (Ian McKellen) and company are basking in the glory of victory at Helm's Deep and Isengard, while Frodo (Elijah Wood), Sam (Sean Astin), and Gollum trek toward Mount Doom to destroy the ring.

Continue reading: The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King Review

Seed of Chucky Review


Good
Just when you thought puppets couldn't kill and screw any more than they did in Team America: World Police, along comes Seed of Chucky, the fifth film in the Child's Play series. Giving the South Park creators an inch-long wooden bird by stealing the market for weird puppet comedies, Seed of Chucky steals the show as the new king of all puppet comedies and leaves no envelope unpushed, no bad joke avoided, and no pop star alive.

The classic campfest that is Seed of Chucky begins as any movie with "Seed of" in the title should... by having one of the weirdest credit sequences featuring doll sperm flying into an egg and watching a small doll gestate, complete with umbilical cord and "Made in Japan" stamp.

Continue reading: Seed of Chucky Review

On a Clear Day Review


Good
Over here in America, it seems we just cannot get enough of the gentle shenanigans of average, everyday Brits. If they are slightly older and perhaps finding themselves financially strapped and driven to eyebrow-raising lengths by the hard times, well, so much the better. Into this proud lineage comes On a Clear Day a charming, if slight, bit of fluff from across the pond that has nothing whatsoever to do with the similarly-titled Barbra Streisand musical from the '70s.Peter Mullan plays Frank, a quiet, middle-aged Scot who is left floundering when he is laid off from his shipbuilding job. He embarks on a mission, seemingly on a lark, to swim the English Channel in an effort to give himself purpose and shed personal demons that have plagued him for years. Admittedly, this is quite thin, plotwise, but if we learned anything but a new dance routine from The Full Monty, it's that working-class British fellows made redundant can be remarkably entertaining in keeping themselves occupied.Though he staunchly refuses to tell his family anything about his intentions, Frank has a small clique of friends - former coworkers, mostly - serving as his motley training crew, headed by a put-upon Chinese fish-and-chips vendor (Benedict Wong) and given hyper energy by the cheerfully hapless Danny (Billy Boyd). They are caught up in Frank's determination to change his life, and predictably inspired to do something new with their own, and it is remarkably sweet and uplifting in a straightforward and non-saccharine way, a rarity these days.First-time feature director Gaby Dellal has crafted a dutifully small and endearing bit of fluff, only faltering briefly with some easily-forgiven flaws. She does fall victim to a hallmark of young directors - the need to be unnecessarily flashy - with her shooting of action via its reflection in a small domed mirror or her slow pans of an ordinary boat. Also, the film is not adept at offering fleshed-out logic. Why this unassuming Scottish man takes on a personal mission to swim the Channel, or what he hopes it will accomplish - and what it does ultimately accomplish - is left unaddressed and open to interpretation. But if you accept the pull of those crazy urges we get from time to time - the desire to do something stupid, and hard, and to revel in a feeling of true accomplishment - then that is probably sufficient in the way of movie logic.What gives the film layers and makes it so watchable is the extremely capable acting. Mullan (My Name is Joe, Young Adam) is an immensely likeable actor, and his Frank is an amiable and capable fellow, but he can also be profoundly frustrating. Being taciturn is one thing, but he often seems to outright ignore his wife (the adorably floopy Brenda Blethyn). And he is deeply scarred by the death of his son nearly 25 years ago, but he's so distant from his surviving son that it borders on rude. This persistent haze that surrounds poor Frank, and mires him into such melancholic inaction, is what prevents On a Clear Day from being a straight-up comedy. All of the characters are witty and quirky (though not aggressively so) and have their moments of amusing antics, but they are also each battling a very real sadness, and the film does well in striking a balance between the two.There is little about On a Clear Day that is especially profound or innovative, to be sure. The most effusive praise it will likely garner is that it is genuinely cute and sweet without becoming twee or simplistic. That said, there is certainly a place - and a market - for films like these. I certainly know what I'll be telling my Auntie to see the next time she tells me they don't make "nice movies" anymore.Nope, can't see forever.
Billy Boyd

Billy Boyd Quick Links

News Pictures Video Film Quotes RSS
Advertisement

Billy Boyd

Date of birth

28th August, 1968

Occupation

Actor

Sex

Male

Height

1.69