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John Stamos, Billy Bob Thornton and Star On The Hollywood Walk Of Fame - Leron Gurber, Gerry Beckley, Dewey Bunnell, John Stamos, Billy Bob Thornton Monday 6th February 2012 The group America is honored with a Star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame

John Stamos, Billy Bob Thornton and Star On The Hollywood Walk Of Fame
Billy Bob Thornton, John Stamos and Star On The Hollywood Walk Of Fame
Billy Bob Thornton, John Stamos and Star On The Hollywood Walk Of Fame
Billy Bob Thornton, John Stamos and Star On The Hollywood Walk Of Fame
Billy Bob Thornton, John Stamos and Star On The Hollywood Walk Of Fame
Billy Bob Thornton, John Stamos and Star On The Hollywood Walk Of Fame

Billy Bob Thornton Wednesday 16th November 2011 Billy Bob Thornton walking on Bedford Drive in Beverly Hills Beverly Hills, California

Billy Bob Thornton
Billy Bob Thornton
Billy Bob Thornton
Billy Bob Thornton
Billy Bob Thornton
Billy Bob Thornton

Billy Bob Thornton and Grauman's Chinese Theatre - Billy Bob Thornton and family, Hollywood, California - at Warner Bros. World Premiere of 'Happy Feet Two' at Grauman's Chinese Theatre. Sunday 13th November 2011

Billy Bob Thornton and Grauman's Chinese Theatre

Billy Bob Thornton - Bella Thornton, Connie Angland, Billy Bob Thornton, William Thornton Los Angeles, California - The Los Angeles Premiere of 'Puss in Boots' held at the Regency Sunday 23rd October 2011

Billy Bob Thornton
Billy Bob Thornton
Billy Bob Thornton

Billy Bob Thornton Sunday 23rd October 2011 The Los Angeles Premiere of 'Puss in Boots' held at the Regency - outside Los Angeles, California

Billy Bob Thornton
Billy Bob Thornton
Billy Bob Thornton
Billy Bob Thornton
Billy Bob Thornton
Billy Bob Thornton

Oliver Jackson-Cohen, Billy Bob Thornton, Carla Gugino and Dwayne Johnson - Oliver Jackson-Cohen, Carla Gugino, Dwayne Johnson and Billy Bob Thornton Hollywood, California - Los Angeles Premiere of 'Faster' held at the Grauman's Chinese Theatre Monday 22nd November 2010

Oliver Jackson-cohen, Billy Bob Thornton, Carla Gugino and Dwayne Johnson
Oliver Jackson-cohen
Oliver Jackson-cohen
Oliver Jackson-cohen, Billy Bob Thornton, Carla Gugino and Dwayne Johnson
Oliver Jackson-cohen
Oliver Jackson-cohen

Billy Bob Thornton and Ed Sullivan Monday 15th November 2010 at The Late Show With David Letterman Celebrities arriving at the Ed Sullivan Theatre for 'The Late Show' with David Letterman

Billy Bob Thornton and Ed Sullivan
Billy Bob Thornton and Ed Sullivan
Billy Bob Thornton and Ed Sullivan
Billy Bob Thornton and Ed Sullivan

Billy Bob Thornton - Billy Bob Thornton, Daugher Bella, and Connie Angland, Hollywood, California - Los Angeles Premiere of Legend of the Guardians The Owls of Ga'Hoole held at the Grauman's Chinese Theatre Sunday 19th September 2010

Billy Bob Thornton

Faster Trailer


The last bank robbery Driver committed left him with a heavy prison sentence and the loss of his brothers life, now ten years on since the incident, Driver has been released from prison and seeks to hunt down the people who double crossed him and his brother.

Continue: Faster Trailer

Billy Bob Thornton and CBS Thursday 18th March 2010 ShoWest 2010 - CBS Films ShoWest luncheon Las Vegas, Nevada

Billy Bob Thornton and Cbs
Billy Bob Thornton and Cbs
Billy Bob Thornton and Cbs
Billy Bob Thornton and Cbs
Billy Bob Thornton and Cbs
Billy Bob Thornton and Cbs

The Informers Review


Bad
The drug-addled zombies lurching through Gregor Jordan's The Informers are relics, dinosaurs from a decadent decade who belong in a museum, not a movie theater. Their destructively self-absorbed attitudes might have shocked audiences in 1983, the year the picture is set. Since then, however, we've spent too much time in the dead zones of Melrose Place, The O.C., and The Hills to be shaken by southern California's over-privileged fraternity.

Like a soap opera, Informers introduces multiple characters and touches on their issues. The nicest ones are stoners, voyeurs, and adulterers. On the flip side, we get kidnappers, drug dealers, and pedophiles.

Continue reading: The Informers Review

Billy Bob Thornton and Jimmy Kimmel Wednesday 22nd April 2009 outside the El Capitan Theatre after performing with his band The Boxmasters on the 'Jimmy Kimmel Live' outdoor mini-concert in Hollywood Los Angeles, California

Billy Bob Thornton and Jimmy Kimmel
Billy Bob Thornton and Jimmy Kimmel
Billy Bob Thornton and Jimmy Kimmel

Eagle Eye Review


Good
Bruce Sterling's 1998 novel Distraction opens with a group of strangers converging on a bank, each with one specific task. By the time they are done, the entire bank has been disassembled. While this idea of a smart mob's destructive power isn't exactly new, Eagle Eye's variations on the concept make for compelling, if sometimes contrived, cinema.

Jerry Shaw (Shia LaBeouf) is an underachiever mourning the recent death of his overachieving twin brother Ethan. Across town, Rachel Holloman (Michelle Monaghan) is sending her little boy Sam (Cameron Boyce) on a school band trip. While Jerry arrives home to find his apartment filled with every piece of terrorist contraband known to man and a voice on his cell phone telling him to run, Rachel receives a call telling her to follow instructions or her son's train will be derailed.

Continue reading: Eagle Eye Review

Billy Bob Thornton and Conan O Brien - Tuesday 23rd September 2008 at NBC New York City, USA

Billy Bob Thornton and Conan O Brien
Billy Bob Thornton and Conan O Brien
Billy Bob Thornton and Conan O Brien
Billy Bob Thornton and Conan O Brien
Billy Bob Thornton and Conan O Brien
Billy Bob Thornton and Conan O Brien

Billy Bob Thornton - Tuesday 16th September 2008 at Grauman's Chinese Theatre Hollywood, California

Billy Bob Thornton
Billy Bob Thornton
Billy Bob Thornton
Billy Bob Thornton
Billy Bob Thornton

Billy Bob Thornton and The Boxmasters - Billy Bob Thornton and The Boxmasters Friday 5th September 2008 at Hard Rock Hotel And Casino Las Vegas, Nevada

Billy Bob Thornton and The Boxmasters
Billy Bob Thornton and The Boxmasters

Billy Bob Thornton and the Boxmasters - Billy Bob Thornton and the Boxmasters Monday 18th August 2008 at Highline Ballroom New York City, USA

Billy Bob Thornton and The Boxmasters
Billy Bob Thornton and The Boxmasters
Billy Bob Thornton and The Boxmasters
Billy Bob Thornton and The Boxmasters
Billy Bob Thornton and The Boxmasters
Billy Bob Thornton and The Boxmasters

J.D. Andrew, Billy Bob Thornton and Michael Wayne - J.D. Andrew, W.R. 'Bud' Thorton aka Billy Bob Thornton and Michael Wayne Butler New York City, USA - Billy Bob Thornton and the Boxmasters celebrate the release of their new album 'the Boxmasters' at J & R Music and Computer World Monday 18th August 2008

J.d. Andrew, Billy Bob Thornton and Michael Wayne
J.d. Andrew, Billy Bob Thornton and Michael Wayne
J.d. Andrew, Billy Bob Thornton and Michael Wayne
J.d. Andrew, Billy Bob Thornton and Michael Wayne
J.d. Andrew, Billy Bob Thornton and Michael Wayne
J.d. Andrew, Billy Bob Thornton and Michael Wayne

Billy Bob Thornton and David Letterman - Thursday 13th September 2007 at Ed Sullivan Theatre New York City, USA

Billy Bob Thornton and David Letterman
Billy Bob Thornton and David Letterman
Billy Bob Thornton and David Letterman
Billy Bob Thornton and David Letterman
Billy Bob Thornton and David Letterman
Billy Bob Thornton and David Letterman

Mr. Woodcock Review


Bad
For half of the last decade, Billy Bob Thornton has been filling the scumbag/jerk quotient to dwindling effect, culminating in last year's abysmal School for Scoundrels. One half-expected him to try and nab a role in a Catherine Breillat film just to get the taste out of his mouth. It seems this was all wishful thinking: Thornton's latest retread into berating fat kids, retards, and asthma victims, Mr. Woodcock, is at once both completely aimless and without the slightest sense of fun.

Pushed back and up for almost a year now, Woodcock comes from a lineage of productions so misguided that studios eventually release them just to wash their hands of them. Originally slated for a late spring/early summer release, the film was tossed back to November to allow for re-shoots and new edits. Ultimately none of it mattered and they pushed it back up to September. The fact that Wedding Crashers ace David Dobkin was brought in for the aforementioned re-shoots makes the absence of even the lightest chuckle even more profound.

Continue reading: Mr. Woodcock Review

Billy Bob Thornton, Halle Berry, John Singleton and The Producers - Tuesday 10th April 2007 at Ziegfeld Theatre New York City, USA

Billy Bob Thornton, Halle Berry, John Singleton and The Producers
Billy Bob Thornton and John Singleton
Billy Bob Thornton and John Singleton
Billy Bob Thornton and John Singleton

Billy Bob Thornton and John Singleton Wednesday 22nd August 2007

Billy Bob Thornton and John Singleton
Billy Bob Thornton and John Singleton

Billy Bob Thornton - Saturday 4th August 2007 at El Rey Theatre Los Angeles, California

Billy Bob Thornton
Billy Bob Thornton
Billy Bob Thornton
Billy Bob Thornton
Billy Bob Thornton
Billy Bob Thornton

The Astronaut Farmer Review


Very Good
The Astronaut Farmer taught me that, according to the Polish brothers, I am a dream-crushing non-believer. And all things considered, I am just fine with that.

The overly cutesy name refers to a man who is both a farmer and named Farmer (Billy Bob Thornton), a rancher in a small Texas town who never gave up his youthful dreams of becoming an astronaut, and so continues pursuing them in his spare time. Out in his barn, he's spent years building a rocket out of salvaged parts in order to finally get himself into outer space. Farmer's entire family revolves around his dream: His 15-year-old son runs mission control, his adorable little girls play moon games, and his family ranch is mortgaged to the hilt to pay for it.

Continue reading: The Astronaut Farmer Review

Bad Santa Review


Excellent
Director Terry Zwigoff launched a career with his debut film, Crumb, the disturbing yet fascinating documentary about cult comic book artist Robert Crumb. It's rumored that in order to get Crumb to agree to have a biopic, Zwigoff threatened to kill himself if Crumb refused to cooperate. Then the film festival hero went on to direct the fantastically negative, critically acclaimed Ghost World. From those dark beginnings comes Bad Santa, Zwigoff's idea of a Christmas movie, and it's nothing less than you'd expect. Finally, misanthropes have a holiday film of their very own.

In the role he was born to play, Billy Bob Thornton is the bad Santa, a.k.a. Willie Stokes, a chain-smoking, bourbon-guzzling con man who can't utter a sentence without a curse word. Willie and his little-person friend Marcus (Tony Cox) travel from city to city each holiday season, running the same scam: Willie and Marcus play Santa and elf for cut rates, and then Willie cracks the store/mall's safe on Christmas Eve, stealing enough money for them to skip town. But until the big Eve heist, Marcus has to keep the drunk, stumbling, foul-mouthed Santa from "boning" women in the dressing rooms and pissing himself in the Santa chair before passing out, so they can keep their jobs.

Continue reading: Bad Santa Review

School For Scoundrels Review


Good
In School for Scoundrels, director Todd Phillips (Road Trip) proves that his truest virtue is also his greatest vice. Most comedies made in Hollywood today are stuffed to the gills with joke after joke after joke, with seemingly little regard for whether the humor actually works. In the bizarre logic of studio filmmaking, a lame joke is better than no joke at all. Phillips takes the opposite tack in his films. He's more concerned with the quality of laughs than with the quantity of them. His best effort, Old School, is a riotously funny movie with a surprisingly conservative sprinkling of jokes. It's a model of comic efficiency. Every bit works and every gag hit its target. However, there's a dark side to this approach. The slightest miscalculation in the quality of a joke can lead to long stretches without so much as a chuckle or even a smirk. And it's this problem that unfortunately afflicts School for Scoundrels.

Scoundrels gets off to a sluggish start as it introduces its main character, Roger (Jon Heder), a geeky New York City meter maid (meter butler?) whose life is falling apart. He gets robbed at work. His boss is unsympathetic to his problems and his coworkers ridicule him. He regularly humiliates himself in front of his gorgeous neighbor, Amanda (Jacinda Barrett). And even his volunteer work is a disaster, as his Little Brother asks to be assigned to someone else. Heder channels the inner nerd that carried Napoleon Dynamite to its stratospheric success, but the script doesn't provide enough originality or comic punch to bring his character to life. The opening 15 minutes are flat, dimensionless, and largely laugh-free.

Continue reading: School For Scoundrels Review

The Ice Harvest Review


Good
Harold Ramis hasn't been kind to his own reputation in the last few years. One of the few uncontested great comedy filmmakers, he's diluted his resume with serviceable but still watery products like Bedazzled and the unfortunate duology of Analyze This and Analyze That. So while his newest, the Christmas noir comedy The Ice Harvest isn't Ramis's best work, it's also the sharpest thing he's done since Groundhog Day and hopefully the sign of more interesting things to come.

With a heart as black as exhaust-stained slush, The Ice Harvest is based on a novel by that jolliest of writers, Scott Phillips (A Simple Plan). Taking place over one long, frozen and grimy Christmas Eve in Wichita, it all starts with Charlie Arglist (John Cusack), a lawyer for the local crime syndicate, handing off a bag to his cohort, Vic Cavanaugh (Billy Bob Thornton), the bag containing over $2 million they stole from the Kansas City boss, Bill Guerrard (Randy Quaid). Vic hides the money and he and Arglist split up for the night, aiming to get the hell out of town in the morning. Being a noir patsy, Arglist proceeds to drink, draw far too much attention to himself, flirt with the local fatale (Connie Nielsen, dead wrong for the job at hand), and get more and more suspicious about Vic's motives. Paranoia ensues when one of Guerrard's gunsels starts poking around the seedy joints that Arglist has been hanging out in.

Continue reading: The Ice Harvest Review

Monster's Ball Review


Terrible
Strangeways, here we come: Marc Forster represents jungle fever in some mighty odd ways throughout Monster's Ball. Racist Georgia slammer prison guard Billy Bob Thornton frequents his favorite late-night diner after days spent monitoring death row. He orders coffee -- black! And a side order of chocolate ice cream. By the time he sizes up ghetto waitress Halle Berry, you can tell by his hungry eyes (and hungry heart) that he'd love to sink his teeth into a big ol' slice of chocolate cheesecake.

His choco-licious cravings would make for comic gold if Forster were aiming for dark comedy. It really ain't much different from the classic line in Airplane! when that precocious little girl quips, "I like my coffee black, like my men!" But Forster chooses to play it straight and solemn, a hopelessly limiting choice. Without benefit of slapstick satire, Forster's glib presentation of interracial skin's allure feels ignorant and borderline offensive. The only thing missing is Halle Berry biting down on a vanilla wafer -- though she does beat her fat son for scarfing down chocolate bars ("I'll slap the black off of you!").

Continue reading: Monster's Ball Review

Intolerable Cruelty Review


Good
How can you not love the Coen brothers? The sibling creators of some of cinema's most classic films -- Fargo, Blood Simple, O Brother, Where Art Thou? -- are back at it, this time with their strangest production yet.

Oh, I don't mean strange as in Raising Arizona strange. I mean strange in that it's dearthly lacking the sophisticated humor we've come to expect from the duo. Strange in that it's so Hollywood-conventional as to make its existence puzzling at best, unnecessary at worst.

Continue reading: Intolerable Cruelty Review

Levity Review


Very Good
Billy Bob Thornton does a variation of his nearly invisible barber from The Man Who Wasn't There in screenwriter Ed Solomon's directorial debut Levity, escaping once again into a role of a hollow loner whose contemplative interior life dominates his every waking hour. Yet unlike in the Coen brothers' loopy noir homage, Thornton's character - a recently paroled convict named Manual (yes, "Manual") Jordan - is not a passive observer but, rather, a lost soul vainly searching for some way to make up for past sins. Although he does not believe in God (or divine redemption), Manual traverses the empty streets of his hometown desperately looking for some way to lessen the burden he has carried since that fateful day he shot a young convenience store clerk in a robbery gone terribly awry.

Thornton's reserved performance, involving lots of aimless shuffling around town and empty stares into nothingness, is well suited to the rhythms of Solomon's glacially-paced film (which he wrote as well as directed); his Manual a man who, having been unceremoniously dumped back into society against his will (he believes he deserves to stay in prison for his crime), doesn't know how to pick up the pieces of his non-existent life and move forward. With long thinning grey locks and a weathered, creased face, Manual is like a ghost forever doomed to haunt the locale of his greatest error, and when he moves through a subway station tunnel directly after leaving the Big House, it's not surprising to find that the crowds rush past him without acknowledging his presence. Thornton plays the character as though he had shriveled up from the inside out, and his expressions of bemused confusion and timid fright convey the feelings of unwieldy guilt and desperation that plague his conscience.

Continue reading: Levity Review

All The Pretty Horses Review


Weak
All the Pretty Horses reminds me of a bad comedian telling a joke. He begins with an awful set-up and takes forever introducing the characters. If you're lucky, he stumbles into the narrative within five minutes. By the time he's arrived at the punch line, you don't care. You've forgotten the setup altogether.

Billy Bob Thornton's latest film, which examines a Texas cowboy trying to find his dreams in 1949 Mexico, is a tale I might have been interested in. But like that lousy comedian, Thornton's delivery positively stinks. And, what's worse, I couldn't find the punch line anywhere.

Continue reading: All The Pretty Horses Review

Bad News Bears Review


Bad
When a movie this awful tosses the adjective "bad" into its title, we call it truth in advertising. Look beyond the easy-target moniker and you'll find even more bad news: Richard Linklater's remake of Michael Ritchie's misfits-on-the-mound classic is a major league disappointment, a mean-spirited, insensitive, and racist misfire that should have Walter Matthau and original Bad News Bears screenwriter Bill Lancaster spinning in their graves.

Linklater scored critical praise for his similarly paced School of Rock, and makes only slight alterations to the slacker-mentors-kids formula in hopes of duplicating his success. His cringeworthy Bears places former major league pitcher Morris Buttermaker (Billy Bob Thornton) in charge of a scornful army of selfish brats, then marches them through conventional hurdles on the way to a preposterous championship game.

Continue reading: Bad News Bears Review

Bandits (2001) Review


Weak
If you start a movie by telling people how it's going to end, well, telling us how it gets there better be one hell of a good time. And to be sure, Bandits begins with its ending, but the story leading up to the dramatic finale is just about as lame as they come.

Doing time for unknown crimes, Joe (Bruce Willis) and Terry (Billy Bob Thornton) are milling about the clink one day when our hunky inmate Joe engineers a daring escape, taking his milquetoast pal Terry along for the ride. Within a few nights on the lam, they've engineered a plan for a new kind of bank robbery -- kidnap the bank manager at his home, spend the night at his house, then waltz in with him first thing in the morning and abscond with all the money.

Continue reading: Bandits (2001) Review

Waking Up In Reno Review


Terrible
There are bad movies, and there are awful movies. And then there is Waking Up in Reno, one of the worst films ever made, so bad it had to be delayed theatrically at least a couple of times before finally grossing about $260,000 in theaters.

Swept Away more than doubled that.

Continue reading: Waking Up In Reno Review

Pushing Tin Review


OK
Pushing Tin is being promoted as a funny, endearing look at the crazy-wacky lives of air traffic controllers, with a little romance in the mix.

Pushing Tin is actually a droll, relatively lifeless look at the crazy-wacky lives of two rival air traffic controllers (Cusack and Thornton), neither of whom you'll actually like very much nor care about.

Continue reading: Pushing Tin Review

The Alamo (2004) Review


Terrible
A soldier's life has been famously characterized by hours of boredom punctuated by moments of stark terror. Well, The Alamo manages to capture half that story.

The Alamo isn't a patriotic, heart-swelling epic. It's a dull, rotten, dreary, excruciatingly-long miniseries which sadly reduces men of historical significance to dirtbags fighting over dirt. Yawn. Ugh. Another $100 million that could have saved the Texas school system.

Continue reading: The Alamo (2004) Review

The Man Who Wasn't There Review


OK
I was warned in advance about The Man Who Wasn't There, having been told it was "definitely a Coen brothers movie." Indeed, there's no better description for this film aside from that vague insult.

Shot in black and white as an homage to film noir, The Man Who Wasn't There (no relation to the Steve Guttenberg movie of the same name) tells the tale of Ed Crane (Billy Bob Thornton, sporting a veritable work of art on his head as a toupee), a mild mannered, chain-smoking barber in sleepy 1940s Santa Rosa, California. As Ed's life consists of cutting the same heads of hair day in and day out, he can be forgiven for a little dissatisfaction with his life.

Continue reading: The Man Who Wasn't There Review

Princess Mononoke Review


OK
Every once in a while a movie comes along that is downright frustrating. No matter how badly you want to enjoy it, you end up walking out of the theater feeling deprived. Such is the case with Princess Mononoke (aka Mononoke Hime). Packed with an abundance of creativity and an innovative albeit complicated plot, the movie is almost recommendable. To its credit, it succeeds in captivating the viewer for a good hour, the downside is that the film lasts for almost two and a half. And believe me, that downside is a long slow, slipping down ride.

Based upon Japanese folklore, Princess Mononoke is the animated story of the war between the encroachment of civilization and the beast gods of the forest. While the forests are being devastated by the Tatara clan, producers of iron, the Great God of the Forest gives power to the other forest gods to protect their domain against the humans in the form of giant animals. Sound confusing? That's just the beginning.

Continue reading: Princess Mononoke Review

Tombstone Review


Very Good
If Kurt Russell's handlebar mustache doesn't give you the willies, you need a bigger TV.

The definitive populist telling of the Wyatt Earp story, Tombstone has more fun with the story than traditionalist versions like Kevin Costner's Wyatt Earp, with a younger, more crowd-pleasing cast -- Thomas Haden Church plays a bad guy; Jason Priestley is a deputy. And it's got more factual holes than the Clanton gang ended up with -- all in the name of serving up Good Clean Fun.

Continue reading: Tombstone Review

Don't Look Back Review


Good
Yet another Eric Stoltz drug junkie thriller, only this time it's split between L.A. and Galveston, Texas. Body count = ~11. Oddly, this film has no known producer.

Primary Colors Review


Very Good
A more timely film would be difficult to imagine. Mike Nichols' highly anticipated -- and thinly veiled -- homage to the Clinton presidential campaign recently hit theaters, and it's worth a look. While the first half is an immensely funny jab at the political campaigning process, and Travolta and Thompson do a bang-up job as Bill and Hilary, you could probably leave when Clinton's... er... Stanton's opponent has a heart attack. The unfortunate second half of Primary Colors gives us an overwrought morality play about political mudslinging, and adds unnecessarily to an already overlong film. Overall, it's definitely worth a look, but don't expect any great insights into the workings of the system... or the workings of Clinton's mind.

Continue reading: Primary Colors Review

Armageddon Review


OK
Relatively silly and far too long disaster movie, with a gang of unruly oil drillers sent to dig an 800-foot hole on an asteroid, drop a nuke down the hole, and get the heck home, before earth is destroyed. About like it sounds -- also, somebody please boot Liv Tyler off the planet before her acting hurts somebody.

Continue reading: Armageddon Review

Friday Night Lights Review


Very Good
When the lights come on at the 20,000-seat Ratliff Stadium, the city of Odessa, Texas shuts down. Streets are deserted and stores close early so that everyone can crowd onto the sparse campus of Permian High School to cheer on their Panthers. In this small, barren town, Friday night football is bigger than life.

Based on journalist H.G. Bissinger's best selling book, Friday Night Lights examines the craze surrounding the team's bumpy road to the 1988 state championship. For these players, excelling at football is the only ticket out of their dilapidated desert town. All of Odessa's residents are motivated to do their part to help get them out. Players are pushed to the breaking point on the field by driven coaches, and equally pressed off the field by their win-obsessed parents. At the local burger joint, players eat for free, heed words of advice, and pose for pictures with fans.

Continue reading: Friday Night Lights Review

A Simple Plan Review


Good
I'll come right out and say it. Fargo was a better movie. The camera angles, landscaping, and feel you get from the story all represent 1996's Fargo. The two movies have many similarities. The heroine is naïve, yet capable and pregnant. The town they live in is small, covered with snow, and everybody knows your name. The initial murder in the film snowballs into more. Everyone wants the money for themselves (that happens to be a kidnapping ransom). I could go on but I don't want to bore you.

Bill Paxton stars as Hank Mitchell, a normal every day kind of guy. Hank, his moronic brother Jacob (Billy Bob Thornton) and Jacob's friend Lou (Brent Briscoe) find a crashed plane filled with 4.4 million dollars one day and decide to keep it. Well, kind of. Hank is the smartest of the three and he thinks it would be a good idea to keep the money until the plane is found, then disperse it among themselves. Here come the murders.

Continue reading: A Simple Plan Review

The Badge Review


OK
Billy Bob channels Billy Bob, his Monster's Ball persona, that is, in this southern cop/tranny/stripper/murder/politico drama that's barely watchable for much more than half an hour at a time. Robby Henson is earnest, earnest, in his attempt to make the movie edgy (Patricia Arquette married a transsexual!!!), but he kills any chance at real intrigue with his slow-as-molasses pace and his laughable plot points, bad dialogue, and worse acting. My only question is what Starz! saw in the movie, aside from the names of its lead actors.

Bad News Bears Review


Weak
When the executives at Paramount Pictures saw Billy BobThornton play a bitter, abusive, drunkard shopping-mall Kris Kringle in2003's raunchy, bitingly funny "BadSanta," they must have said to themselves,"If we water this down to a PG-13, we'll make a mint!"

Thus was born the lackluster remake of 1976's "TheBad News Bears."

Once an edgy but family-friendly Little League comedy fullof cursing pre-pubescent underdogs and starring Walter Matthau as theirbooze-hound coach, this 2005 version -- starring Thornton, co-written by"Bad Santa" screenwriters, and lazily directed by the usuallycreative Richard Linklater -- has lost both its bite and its heart.

Thornton's uncharacteristically flat take on the characterof coach Walter Buttermaker -- a trailer-park bum and exterminator by tradewho once played half an inning in the pros -- has little of Matthau's cantankeroushound-dog congeniality. His "who cares" attitude toward his baseballteam of delinquents, nerds, over-eaters, immigrants and paraplegics soonbecomes humorously motivational abuse, then "win at all costs"obsessiveness, then "just have fun out there" altruism withoutmuch rationale beyond the screenplay's say-so.

Continue reading: Bad News Bears Review

Princess Mononoke Review


OK

Some foreign films should never be dubbed. Reading an elementary translation in subtitle while hearing the passion and emotion in the inflection of the original voices is often more honest and more engrossing than hearing the same words spoken in English.

This seems to be especially true of "Princess Mononoke," an animated, fairy tale allegory about mankind's exploitation of nature set in feudal Japan and created by anime master Hayao Miyazaki.

Redubbed for American release, this handsome, stirring movie looks and feels spectacular with its incredible watercolors of forest landscapes, its giant and intelligent wild animals and its ancient, epic mythology.

Continue reading: Princess Mononoke Review

Pushing Tin Review


Good

As tremendously cocksure rival air traffic controllers,John Cusack and Billy Bob Thornton amplify the already provokingly chargedatmosphere of "Pushing Tin," a caustic, chaotic, dark comedythat takes place in the killer-stress world of the Long Island's TerminalRadar Approach Control center.

Inside this non-descript, suburban office park bunker,thousands of lives an hour depend on the cool cucumbers who line up planesfor landing at Kennedy, LaGuardia and Newark like so many video game blips,always under pressure to keep flights on time while preserving the safetyof the skies.

So you will pardon these guys if they develop a bit ofa deity complex, knowing they have that kind of dominion over billionsof tons of expensive aircraft and all those people's lives.

Continue reading: Pushing Tin Review

Friday Night Lights Review


Weak

"Friday Night Lights" takes place in a dismal West Texas suburb where society revolves entirely around high school football and the "winning is everything" philosophy is considered an All-American value.

Director Peter Berg ("The Rundown") vividly captures life here beginning with the opening shot -- an aerial view of sagebrush, oil pumps and dust rising to a hazy horizon as a pickup barrels down a dirt road, an AM radio sports show blaring out its windows with boorish, pejorative fans calling in for a round of Monday morning quarterbacking.

But the film seems to endorse the hardcore sports-junkie attitude that obstinately forgives arrogance, misogyny, substance abuse, narrow-mindedness and bullying in any star athlete just as long as he produces results on the field. The movie's principles are seriously out of whack, even as it angles toward a Big Life Lesson about learning to live with falling short of greatness.

Continue reading: Friday Night Lights Review

Bad Santa Review


Good

"Bad Santa" is one hilariously crass Christmas comedy -- and most certainly not for kids.

From the comical poor taste of running the title credit over a shot of a bitter, broken-down, booze-hound mall Santa (Billy Bob Thornton) upchucking in an alley behind a bar, to the antagonism-eroding friendship he strikes up with an overweight, none-too-bright, literally snot-faced kid (Brett Kelly) who follows him from a department store, this movie is fearlessly twisted and has only the slightest hint of traditional redemption.

But man, it is funny.

Continue reading: Bad Santa Review

Love Actually Review


OK

"Love Actually" is terminally precious. Chirpy "classic" pop songs populate every third scene. It has no structure, just a jumble of interconnected stories -- some little dramas, some little comedies -- about love, flirtation, courtship and heartbreak, all of which will pay off just in time for a lovely London Christmas.

It's the kind of pandering, populist movie in which Hugh Grant, playing the prime minister of England, joyously shakes his booty to The Pointer Sisters' "Jump (For My Love)" until he suddenly, to his great embarrassment, realizes he's being watched. It offers no real surprises except in how and when it reveals the inevitable six degrees of separation between each anecdotal yarn -- none of which has enough substance to ever stand on its own (nor would you want them to!).

And yet, you'd have to be a terrible grump to not like "Love Actually" at least a little.

Continue reading: Love Actually Review

The Man Who Wasn't There Review


Good

In their deeply ironic yet habitually impish, beautifully black-and-white 1950s drama "The Man Who Wasn't There," writing-directing brothers Joel and Ethan Coen have revived the dry, laconic spirit of prototypical film noir and applied it to the life of an everyday barber.

True, he's an everyday barber mixed up in the blackmail and murder of his cheating wife's boss and lover. But he's such an obscure, detached shadow of a man that the whole mess feels almost workaday mundane. You see, it's not his wife's affair that motivates the man. "It's a free country," he says in the movie's soporific, quietly sonorous running voice-over. It's the fact that he figures blackmail is a good way to get $10,000 out of the boyfriend so he can invest in some new-fangled invention called dry cleaning.

The barber, named Ed Crane, is played with brilliant reserve by Billy Bob Thornton, who has the most subtly expressive, heavily crevassed film noir face to smoke a dangling cigarette since Humphrey Bogart. He hardly registers a distinguishable emotion in 116 minutes, yet his passive soul fills the screen as Ed's plans go badly awry.

Continue reading: The Man Who Wasn't There Review

Bandits Review


Good

There's a certain manifold, id-fueled whimsy to Barry Levinson's lighter movies that make them feel like carousel rides for grown-ups. From "Diner" to "Wag the Dog," his pictures are packed with enjoyably idiosyncratic characters, every one of them a frolicsome horse of a different color that from their opening scenes feel like friends (even the amoral ones).

In "Bandits" it's a pair of resourceful serial bank robbers and a maniacally disheartened housewife whom you can't wait to take for a ride.

Conspicuously charming, mannerly Joe Blake (Bruce Willis) and precariously nervous hypochondriac Terry Collins (Billy Bob Thornton) are amusingly winning jailbirds from the moment they spontaneously hijack an unexpectedly accessible cement mixer to bust out of the slammer. You cheer them on as they barrel the rig through back yard fences to evade the cops, and you grin when Joe says, "Ma'am, don't forget your purse" as they carjack a Subaru from a suburbanite.

Continue reading: Bandits Review

Intolerable Cruelty Review


Weak

Like a bride who marries a man with bad habits thinking she'll be able to change him, in "Intolerable Cruelty," the eccentric writing-directing brothers Joel and Ethan Coen have married themselves to someone else's original script and the union hasn't turned out as happy as they'd hoped.

Aspiring to the snappy banter and chemistry of a Howard Hawks comedy, the unconventional brains behind "Raising Arizona," "Fargo" and "O Brother, Where Art Thou?" cast George Clooney and Catherine Zeta-Jones as L.A.'s slickest divorce lawyer and the indomitably alluring serial gold-digger who ironically sets his heart aquiver.

The brothers rewrote the screenplay with distinctively Coen quirks, like Clooney's menacing, 87-year-old prune of a senior partner, who spends his fish-eye-lensed scenes attached to a life-support machine in a forebodingly dark, wood-paneled office. But between the picture's high-gloss big-studio sheen (something the brothers aren't accustom to) and its sometimes pedestrian high-camp conventions, "Intolerable Cruelty" seems to have lost both the underlying savvy that gives Coen Brothers comedies their soul and the evenly matched gender rivalries that gave Hawks' romances their heart.

Continue reading: Intolerable Cruelty Review

Monster's Ball Review


Very Good

The opening shot of "Monster's Ball" -- a strenuous, sorrowful, racially-charged drama about finding solace in unexpected places -- is a simple image of Billy Bob Thornton sleeping, his face almost entirely obscured by shadows.

Even though he doesn't move a muscle, his whole body seems somehow racked with so much tension and stress that you inherently understand this slumbering soul is a deeply tormented man.

Now, if he can project all that while completely inert, just imagine how powerful Thornton's acting becomes when he wakes up.

Continue reading: Monster's Ball Review

Billy Bob Thornton

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Billy Bob Thornton

Date of birth

4th August, 1955

Occupation

Actor

Sex

Male

Height

1.83


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Billy Bob Thornton Movies

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Richard Linklater is well known in the film industry as one of the stand out...

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