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Bill Pullman - Celebrities are seen out and about during the Sundance Film Festival Salt Lake City Utah United States Friday 18th January 2013

Bill Pullman and fan - Celebrities arrive at Salt Lake City International Airport Salt Lake City Utah United States Thursday 17th January 2013

Bill Pullman and Fan

Bill Pullman, Jenna Elfman and Josh Gad - Bill Pullman, Jenna Elfman, Josh Gad Pasadena, California, United States NBC Universal's '2013 Winter TCA Tour' Day 1 at Langham Hotel Saturday 5th January 2013

Bill Pullman, Jenna Elfman and Josh Gad
Bill Pullman
Bill Pullman, Jenna Elfman and Josh Gad
Bill Pullman, Jenna Elfman and Josh Gad
Bill Pullman
Bill Pullman

Bill Pullman Pasadena, California, United States NBC Universal's '2013 Winter TCA Tour' Day 1 at Langham Hotel Sunday 6th January 2013

Bill Pullman
Bill Pullman, Jenna Elfman and Josh Gad
Bill Pullman, Jenna Elfman, Josh Gad and Palm Springs International Film Festival Awards Gala
Bill Pullman

Bill Pullman and Palm Springs International Film Festival Awards Gala Palm Springs, California, United States 24th Annual Palm Springs International Film Festival Awards Gala - Red Carpet Saturday 5th January 2013

Bill Pullman and Palm Springs International Film Festival Awards Gala
Bill Pullman and Palm Springs International Film Festival Awards Gala
Bill Pullman and Palm Springs International Film Festival Awards Gala
Bill Pullman and Palm Springs International Film Festival Awards Gala

Bill Pullman Monday 14th May 2012 2012 NBC Upfront Presentation at Radio City Hall - Arrivals

Bill Pullman
Bill Pullman

Bill Pullman Monday 23rd April 2012 Broadway opening night of 'The Lyons' at the Cort Theatre – Arrivals

Bill Pullman
Bill Pullman

Debra Winger, Bill Pullman and Greta Gerwig - Debra Winger, Bill Pullman and Greta Gerwig New York City, USA - on the set of their new film 'Lola Versus' Friday 1st July 2011

Debra Winger, Bill Pullman and Greta Gerwig
Debra Winger and Greta Gerwig
Debra Winger, Bill Pullman and Greta Gerwig
Debra Winger, Bill Pullman and Greta Gerwig

Bill Pullman and HBO Monday 16th May 2011 Bill Pullman HBO presents the premiere of 'Too Big To Fail' based on the book by Andrew Ross Sorkin at the Museum of Modern Art. New York City, USA

Bill Pullman and Hbo
William Hurt, Bill Pullman and Hbo

Bill Pullman Saturday 9th October 2010 attends the Chairmen's Reception during the 18th Annual Hamptons International Film Festival at Private Residence East Hampton, New York

Bill Pullman
Bill Pullman
Bill Pullman

Bill Pullman Tuesday 29th September 2009 Preview for 'Oleanna' on Broadway at John Golden Theatre - Stage Door New York City, USA

Bill Pullman
Bill Pullman

Robert Loggia, Pell James and Bill Pullman - Robert Loggia, Pell James and Bill Pullman Los Angeles, California - Los Angeles premiere of 'Surveillance' held at the Landmark Theater Monday 15th June 2009

Robert Loggia, Pell James and Bill Pullman
Robert Loggia

Nobel Son Review


OK
Plot is a funny thing. Not enough, and audiences will nod off. Too much, however, and you run the risk of confusing the viewer. For the most part, overly complicated films are viewed as arrogant by the majority of the mainstream. They tend to play like convoluted explanations for ideas that are basic, or simply clichéd. After showing us how Napa Valley won the war of the grape in this summer's Bottle Shock, Randall Miller is seeing his 2007 satiric thriller Nobel Son get a "better late then never" awards season push. Yet it's hard to see who will enjoy this catawampus creation. More often than not, Miller appears to be playing to the audience in his head, not the jaded Joe Six-Packs in the actual theater seats.

On the day he leaves for Sweden to pick up his Nobel Prize in chemistry, Dr. Eli Michaelson (Alan Rickman) finds out that his PhD-candidate son Barkley (Bryan Greenberg) has been kidnapped. While his FBI forensics psychologist wife Sarah (Mary Steenburgen) worries, a $2 million ransom is demanded. With the help of Detective Max Mariner (Bill Pullman), and neurotic neighbor Mr. Gastner (Danny Devito), they hope to find the boy alive. What they don't know is that Barkley has befriended his captor, a man named Thaddeus James (Shawn Hatosy) who has a DNA-sized bone to pick with the good doctor. Armed with proof that Michaelson doesn't deserve science's highest honor, the duo will create an elaborate plot to get the cash, clear up the crime, and go their separate ways. So imagine Barkley's surprise when Thaddeus ends up at his front door, with former, improbably-named fling City Hall (Eliza Dushku) on his arm.

Continue reading: Nobel Son Review

Bottle Shock Review


Good
Though it's hard to believe, over 30 years ago, wines from continents other than Europe (and countries other than France and Italy) were considered crap. Not less palatable or uncertain in quality: Boone's Farm meets Thunderbird. Uncivilized swill. Of course, this wasn't true. Napa Valley, as well as regions in Australia, were creating wonderful vintages. But since the French controlled everything about the culture of the grape, their disdain meant no one took outsider vineyards seriously.

In 1976, all that changed. During the year of America's Bicentennial, a British merchant working in Paris came to California looking for participants for his exclusive tasting competition. He hoped to raise awareness of his failing shop and solidify his place in the snobbish wine society. Instead, winemonger Stephen Spurrier made history, and his accidental discoveries sent international palettes into something akin to Bottle Shock. Now, decades since the U.S. became part of cultured world cuisine, director Randall Miller offers up a serio-comic take on the event, and for the most part, it's as tasty as a well-aged Burgundy.

Continue reading: Bottle Shock Review

Bill Pullman and Elle Fanning - Bill Pullman and Elle Fanning Friday 27th June 2008 at Los Angeles Film Festival Westwood, California

Bill Pullman and Elle Fanning
Director Daniel Barnz and Bill Pullman
Bill Pullman
Bill Pullman and Elle Fanning
Bill Pullman
Director Daniel Barnz and Bill Pullman

Bill Pullman - Bill Pullman and Julia Ormond Wednesday 21st May 2008 at Cannes Film Festival Cannes, France

Bill Pullman
Bill Pullman
Bill Pullman
Bill Pullman
Bill Pullman

Johanna Day and Bill Pullman - Johanna Day, Bill Pullman and wife Carol at Fiorello H. LaGuardia High School of Music & Art and Performing Arts Concert Hall at Lincoln Center - Press Room New York City, USA - 53rd Drama Desk Awards Sunday 18th May 2008

Johanna Day and Bill Pullman

You Kill Me Review


Good
Ben Kingsley can do just about anything, and that's basically why he is able to walk the tightrope he does. As popular and talented as Kingsley is, he also has an unmistakable air of anonymity. He's one of the few actors in the game who can play any character and somehow trick us into believing he's not Ben Kingsley playing a character; we just accept him as the character. It's this very talent that gives lesser material (House of Sand and Fog, Suspect Zero) a needed kick of rhythm and believability. Though he's not the only good thing in John Dahl's pulpy You Kill Me, his presence makes the fun all the more refreshing.

As Polish-mob hit-man Frank Falenczyk (pronounced Fail-an-chik), Kingsley has the most fun he's had onscreen since he muttered a red-streak as the frenzied madman Don Logan in Jonathan Glazer's superb Sexy Beast. This time, his gangster-take has a more reserved and subdued nature, playing more for deadpan hilarity than ballistic scares. That deadpan ability serves Frank best when he's banished from his New York home to San Francisco for botching a job after too many drinks. His boss (Philip Baker Hall) has had enough of his alcoholism, and his best friend (Marcus Thomas) can't help him any more. So, it's off to the Bay for him.

Continue reading: You Kill Me Review

Scary Movie 4 Review


Weak
Scary Movie 4 is inane, gross, ridiculous, and pretty stupid. It also made me laugh more than once. That's evidently becoming the theme of slapstick spoof shtick (or at least the endless stream of Scary Movies), that they head straight for the lowest common denominator but amid all of the diarrhea jokes and people getting beaned in the face with flying objects, they hit upon something genuinely witty, almost by accident.

The dumb jokes are, of course, framed in send-ups of other box office hits from the last couple of years - Anna Faris's spectacularly inept and oblivious Cindy Campbell, who appeared in all the previous films, moves into the house from The Grudge, next door to Tom Cruise's - oh, sorry, Tom Ryan's - house from War of the Worlds. The plot, such as it is, somewhat follows the Worlds story, but is really a cobbled-together excuse to veer from spoof to spoof like a sketch comedy, and the dialogue, such as it is, is almost entirely forgettable. Actually, it's largely a time killer, something for the actors to do while carefully oblivious to the antics around them and not really meant to be heard over the guffaws of the audience.

Continue reading: Scary Movie 4 Review

Dear Wendy Review


Terrible
For the most part, 2005 was a great year for movies about something. I won't go through all the titles, but it was obvious that for once in a very long time, directors were good and angry. So, it comes as a large disappointment that Thomas Vinterberg's Dear Wendy fails to get away from its own self-masturbatory America-is-stupid letterhead of war as a means of peace. Gee, I wonder if Vinterberg and screenwriter Lars Von Trier are talking about Bush's "war for peace" and America's botched pacifism.

Set in the unidentifiable town known as Estherslope in some unknown time (confusing since there is a huge Axe deodorant spray advertisement in one scene), Dick (Jamie Bell) lives with his miner father and Clarabelle (Novella Nelson), the family maid. He takes a job at a supermarket and generally acts lonely constantly, especially when his father dies in the mines. At the supermarket, he meets Steven (Mark Webber), a young man exactly like him. Things light up between them when Steven sees Dick with a small gun that Dick thinks is a toy; it isn't. They begin to meet, and slowly form the Dandies, a gang of people who love guns but never use them. All is well in their lives until the sheriff (Bill Pullman) puts Dick in charge of checking in on Clarabelle's grandson, Sebastian (Danso Gordon), a small-time murderer. Sebastian takes liberties with Dick's gun (the titular Wendy) and, well, things don't end well.

Continue reading: Dear Wendy Review

Lucky Numbers Review


Weak
The tagline for this movie reads, "When they put their heads together... it's a no-brainer." I'd say that about sums it up, but I feel obliged to add that this witticism might aptly be suited not only to the film, but to the entire cast and crew of Lucky Numbers.

This is the story of two lovers. Well, except that they don't really love each other, but isn't that always the way? Russ Richards (John Travolta) and Crystal Latroy (Lisa Kudrow) are two self-absorbed local television celebrities looking for a little respect. And money. You see, Richards is more than just a locally renowned weatherman with his own private booth at Denny's. He's also a snowmobile dealer. Or would be, if only it would snow.

Continue reading: Lucky Numbers Review

Spy Games Review


OK
Serious-funny-romantic? Irène Jacob as a Russian spy? Well, Spy Games is a rough production, which probably explains why you've never heard of this film. Jacob and Bill Pullman are on opposite sides of the post-Cold War spy game... all while trying to get it on. It's very silly and improbable, but the leads -- and the inimitable Bruno Kirby -- are hard not to like.

Continue reading: Spy Games Review

The Grudge Review


Good
Sarah Michelle Gellar and the supernatural go together like peas and carrots, to borrow a phrase from our friend Forrest Gump. The starlet's signature role had her slaying vampires as Buffy Summers. We all know what Gellar Did Last Summer, but did you recall she also enjoyed a bit part in Wes Craven's Scream 2 and appeared in both Scooby-Doo movies?

By this roundabout logic, Gellar seems a natural fit for The Grudge, Takashi Shimizu's sufficiently creepy remake of his own cult Japanese horror flick Ju-on, a film he's made versions of a shocking five times now. Americanized and aimed squarely at the people who turned The Ring into a surprise hit, Grudge should satisfy audiences seeking a few cheap jolts for their dollar this Halloween season.

Continue reading: The Grudge Review

Casper Review


Good
Girl meets ghost. Ghost wants to become real to get girl. The live-action version of the classic cartoon doesn't have much to mention aside from some nifty effects and a story lifted from Cinderella. Christina Ricci is always fun to look at, even when she's seen working in her Disneyesque postpubescent era. Fun for kids, I suppose, but hardly worth mentioning otherwise.

Lake Placid Review


OK
It's crocodile season, opening the hunting period on an animal that has been woefully underused in the horror movie litany to date. But unlike most horror/thriller pics, this one features a script by David E. Kelley, best known as the creator of TV's Ally McBeal.

So there's some promise here. But does this monster movie rise above recent crap like Anaconda or Jaws 3-D? A little. It's better than Anaconda, anyway.

Continue reading: Lake Placid Review

Spaceballs Review


Excellent
True story: Before I turned 18, I had seen Spaceballs far more times than I had seen Star Wars. Since then, innate geekiness caught up with me and Star Wars eclipsed it. But when I was ten, my loyalties were with the Mel Brooks parody; the Schwartz was with me.

I don't doubt this is the case for many fans of the best Brooks films--how many kids of the seventies saw Blazing Saddles before laying eyes on a real western, or Young Frankenstein before the bride of same? I point this out to place Spaceballs with those other, more acknowledged Brooks classics.

Continue reading: Spaceballs Review

The Guilty Review


Very Good
Weird and creepy pot boiler has Bill Pullman as a high-profile Manhattan lawyer who gets mixed up in a scheme to off a girl (Anwar) whom he sorta-raped in a drunken haze. Only it turns out the would-be hitman is the long-lost son (Sawa) he never knew he had!

Continue reading: The Guilty Review

Igby Goes Down Review


Very Good
2002 is the year of Kieran Culkin. After a rock-star performance in the one great film this year that everyone missed -- The Dangerous Lives of Altar Boys -- Kieran Culkin delivers another knockout performance as a rebel without a clue or a cause in Igby Goes Down.

Igby Goes Down tells the tale of one boy's rebellion against the 'old money' ways in which he was born. Igby Slocumb (Culkin) lives within a quirky family unit complete with a schizophrenic father (Bill Pullman) - whose last episode earned him a one-way ticket to the funny farm years back, a self-absorbed, Mommie Dearest of a mother (Susan Sarandon), and a repugnant Young Republican reptile of a brother (Ryan Phillippe). His constant attempts at searching out a better life away from his family's stifling dysfunction lead to a number of high school expulsions and an abnormal amount of prescription sedatives for his mother.

Continue reading: Igby Goes Down Review

Rick Review


Good
An update of Rigoletto as seen through the pen of the author of the Lemony Snicket books, Rick is mean-spirited and cruel, and borderline delicious. Bill Pullman is on target as the title character, a widower who plays a fierce game in the business world but who is really just a lackey for his even-bigger prick of a boss, Buck. But the real revelation here is Agnes Bruckner, turning in a nuanced performance as Buck's undersexed yet amazingly hot daughter, worlds away from her dormouse role in Blue Car, seen just a year earlier.

Sommersby Review


Good
Relatively weak popcorn drama, about a man who comes back from the Civil War to reclaim his place at his plantation, only he's not the hero everyone thinks he is. Remake of a French film.

Titan A.E. Review


Weak
Good Will Hunting goes to space in Titan A.E., an ill-conceived and overambitious animation blowout (courtesy of 20th Century Fox) that makes recent Disney fare look like thinking men's movies.

Matt Damon's voice stars as Cale, an eager-beaver twentysomething in the year 3028 who would be just like any other next-millennium Gen X-er if not for one thing: A race of evil beings called the Drej -- made of pure energy, natch -- have blown up the earth.

Continue reading: Titan A.E. Review

Brokedown Palace Review


Excellent
So the words "justice system" are an oxymoron in Thailand. Last year, Return to Paradise vividly portrayed just how corrupt and ruthless the law can be for ignorant tourists who presume that an American passport is a "get out of jail free" card in Southeast Asia. Brokedown Palace, directed by Jonathan Kaplan (The Accused, Love Field) elaborates on this theme, only this time it's two juvenile girls from Upland, Ohio facing trouble inparadise.

To celebrate high school graduation, Alice Mareno (Claire Daines) and Darlene Davis (Kate Beckinsale) plan an eleven day sojourn to Bangkok. ("Las Vegas without parents and laws," Alice proclaims to the more cautious Arlene) After a few days of fun in the sun, the two get a little more than they bargained for after they meet the seductive and alluring Nick Parks (Daniel Lapaine) who invites them on a weekend excursion to Hong Kong. In their rush to get to the airport, they fail to realize that Nick has planted over a kilo of heroin in Darlene's backpack. They both are arrested in the airport and once in prison, Darlene is tricked into signing a confession. They are each convicted of drug trafficking and given 33 years apiece in a hideous prison ruefully described by it's inmates as "The Brokedown Palace." Desperate for help and down to their last hope, the girls turn to "Yankee Hank" (Bill Pullman) a maverick American lawyer who takes up the daunting challenge of defending them. Together the three attempt to salvage their lives and their freedom against the tyrannical Thai government and outlandish justice system.

Continue reading: Brokedown Palace Review

Mr. Wrong Review


Bad
Ellen DeGeneres's subsequent sexuality announcements make her appearance as a single woman desperate for a man in Mr. Wrong more than a little humorous... and that's about it. Her schtick doesn't come across here, the jokes obvious from a mile away. And that's if you consider them "jokes." Bill Pullman is always a pleasure, but not even his fantastically dry wit can salvage this slow-motion train wreck.

Singles Review


Very Good
Crowe's guilty pleasure of a confection outlines the struggles of Gen-X singles in the 1990s, but doesn't portray a wholly realistic version of them. Instead, Singles survives on its charming humor and inadvertant status as the de facto chronicle of the Seattle grunge scene. Watch for endless cameos and stars who would later go on to much higher heights.

Zero Effect Review


Excellent
Story of an anti-hero: Darryl Zero is a drugged-out P.I.... but he's brilliant. Great roles for Pullman and Stiller. Written and directed by Larence Kasdan's son.

The Last Seduction Review


Excellent
John Dahl (of Rounders fame) got his start here, a cool and twisty modern film noir that turned Linda Fiorentino into the '90s most exotic femme fatale (until a series of shitty thrillers drove her budding career into the dirt). Here she's an utterly cold bitch who absconds with her husband's money and winds up in a small town in upstate New York, where she engineers an even bigger con. A delight to watch as she pushes the pawns in her life around like, well, pawns.

Independence Day Review


Excellent
Independence Day marks the glorious realization of what, for me, has been a nearly 25 year wait. Countless prayers have gone unanswered, but on this day, I have finally witnessed on screen what I have only dreamt of all my life, for this film features the complete and total destruction of the city of Houston through the use of nuclear weapons, by the U.S. government's own hand!

But watching my home town be blown away is only one of the charms of ID4 (the film's hip moniker). First there's the War of the Worlds meets Star Wars meets The Right Stuff story, about a superior, marauding alien force threatening to annihilate the human race (and almost succeeding). And an all-star cast of freedom fighters (more on them later). Director Roland Emmerich, who redeems himself for the idiocy of Stargate, and who isn't afraid to kill off the good guys. Some dazzling visuals. Loud sound effects. Plus every Star Trek and X-Files fan in town in the audience. What more do you want?

Continue reading: Independence Day Review

While You Were Sleeping Review


Weak
In case you aren't already prepared, brace yourself for a literal onslaught of summer movie romances. While You Were Sleeping is one of 1995's early entries. It certainly isn't going to be the best.

As heavily promoted as it's been, you should know the plot by know. Sandra Bullock is Lucy, a goofy, salt-of-the-earth Chicago Transit Authority toll booth attendant who falls in love (at first sight) with Peter (Peter Gallagher), a yuppie lawyer. Almost immediately after Lucy swoons, Peter gets pushed onto the train tracks, whereupon Lucy comes to the rescue. Then the obligatory "misunderstanding" occurs: Peter's concerned parents think Lucy is Peter's fiancee, pulling Lucy into the family as a new member. But when Peter's brother Jack (Bill Pullman) arrives on the scene, Lucy and Jack begin to fall in love and, well...you get the picture.

Continue reading: While You Were Sleeping Review

Brain Dead Review


Weak
Is Bill Pullman's brain doctor dead, alive, crazy, sane, what? This bit of Corman (his daughter, anyway) nuttiness has a couple of big pre-star stars in "the two Bills," and while it tries to be as clever and provocative as a movie like Jacob's Ladder, it ends up as inexplicable and inscrutable as Lost Highway... which oddly enough starred Pullman as well. I won't try to explain the plot (okay: brain doctor's brain goes bust), but I don't necessarily suggest you watch it, either.

Newsies Review


OK
"Headlines don't sell papes. Newsies sell papes."

Well, now telemarketers sell papes, and I sure as hell wouldn't want to see a movie about that. Especially if they were singing all the time. But back in 1899, when Joseph Pulitzer (played by Robert Duvall) and William Randolph Hearst raised newspaper prices, that meant the newsies had to pay more for their copies, and they couldn't pass that along to the consumer. So the newsies organized a union and went on strike. And the strike failed.

Continue reading: Newsies Review

Sleepless In Seattle Review


OK
When Harry Met Sally... was a minor cultural milestone when it came out in 1989 -- it was the first movie in almost a decade to present marriage in a favorable light. (The 1980s were the decade in which feminism gained a chokehold on the values of Hollywood.) It was a major artistic triumph as well as a commercial success, and it woke a sleeping giant: the old-fashioned romantic comedy.

Unfortunately, there have been many, many successors since 1989, and most of them don't have as much right to exist. Sleepless in Seattle was one of the first and most obvious. It reteamed cute, perky actress Meg Ryan with writer/director Nora Ephron and even included some of the more annoying aspects of When Harry Met Sally... -- the plot coincidences, the unappealing friends, etc.

Continue reading: Sleepless In Seattle Review

Dear Wendy Review


OK

A fatalistic allegory about the American adoration of guns and black-and-white morality, "Dear Wendy" centers on a band of teenage outcasts in a faded, one-street mining town who form a cult around their almost literal love affairs with vintage firearms.

Pacifists by temperament and timidity, the Dandies, as they call themselves, soon discover confidence and self-possession in carrying their concealed weapons, which they pledge never to brandish in daylight lest they "wake up and pursue their true nature." But as the club members spend their days on a make-shift shooting range (dubbed "The Temple") deep in the bowels of an abandoned mine building, practicing trick shots, obsessively studying famous killers, and watching graphic film of bullet wounds, they slip into fetish and fantasy, naming their guns, and assigning them personalities, emotions, and even imaginary votes in group decisions.

Written by Danish auteur Lars von Trier, with less supercilious socio-political ignorance than his 2003 American-culture morality play "Dogville," the story is overly dependent on the silly narrative contrivance of the Dandies' insecure leader (Jamie Bell from "Billy Elliot") writing love letters to his antique pistol. A few other absurdities rear their heads as well, like the notion of poor mine workers keeping African-American maids -- an impractical byproduct of the writer's never-ending desire to flog the American culture of denial (about race relations, violence, foreign policy or whatever bee is in his bonnet while banging out a particular screenplay).

Continue reading: Dear Wendy Review

Igby Goes Down Review


Excellent

Snarky, 17-year-old, silver-spoon-raised Igby Slocumb has been booted out of every prestigious (and not-so-prestigious) prep school on the East Coast -- and one military academy too. A bored, intelligent, resourceful and willful screw-up, he's almost proud of this record, even though he'd be the first to admit it's a cry for attention.

With a blue-blooded, pill-popping, self-absorbed mother (the hilariously dry Susan Sarandon) dying of breast cancer at home; a materialistically hollow, young Republican brother (a perfectly cast Ryan Phillippe) shining at Columbia University; and an asylum-committed, schizophrenic father (Bill Pullman) who haunts all his childhood memories, Igby (Kieran Culkin) seems to be the only Slocumb sagacious enough to emerge a better person from his sad yet comically dysfunctional family.

So despite the title of this tart black comedy -- "Igby Goes Down" -- its young hero is determined to stay on his feet. He's grown a sardonic, wry sense of humor (if not a tough skin) and become an expert at running away from home. Now, having escaped the limousine taking him to yet another upscale boarding school, he's on the loose in Manhattan, having resolved to get by on his own (or at least with the help of his mother's American Express card), even if he's not entirely sure what that entails.

Continue reading: Igby Goes Down Review

Brokedown Palace Review


Weak

It would be a lot easier to take "Brokedown Palace" seriously as an Americans-imprisoned-abroad drama if the soundtrack wasn't peppered with chart-bound, pensive chick-pop. With empowering anthems from the likes of P.J. Harvey regularly laid down to illustrate its perceived depth of emotion, this movie makes being framed for drug smuggling and locked up in a dingy Thai prison play like little more than a vaguely deep, teen movie metaphor.

The teens in the case are Alice (Claire Danes) and Darlene (Kate Beckinsale), fresh out of high school and spiriting away to the Far East for one crazy summer before starting college.

Two apple-cheeked 18-year-olds, innocent in the ways of the Third World, their spontaneous Asian adventure (they told their parents they were going to Hawaii) begins with carefree cultural touristing at farmers markets and $6-a-night hotels. But it becomes a grim nightmare when a handsome young Australian (Daniel Lapaine) charms them both senseless, then hides heroin in their luggage after inviting them to visit him for a weekend in Hong Kong.

Continue reading: Brokedown Palace Review

Rick Review


Good

Demonstrating that his unique creativity as a writer extends beyond darkly humorous kids' books, in "Rick," Daniel Handler of "Lemony Snicket" fame delves into something more dastardly and grown-up -- an extremely dark comedy adapted from Giuseppe Verdi's tragic opera "Rigoletto" and set in an almost surreal, cut-throat corporate world.

Bill Pullman, who always makes interesting choices when he makes independent films, stars as Rick O'Lette, an aging, career-stalled middle manager who "used to be a nice guy." Now a callous, seething sycophant -- whose own brashness is subservient to a cocky, serpentine young-gun executive (succulently sleazy Aaron Stanford) -- Rick is lured into a murder plot, designed to clear his path to a corner office. A mysteriously au fait old college classmate (charming, matter-of-factly malevolent Dylan Baker) approaches him in some tecnho-Orwellian bar and hints that he makes a seemingly respectable living (with business cards and everything) in the snuff trade and takes advantage of Rick's animosity and ambition.

Director Curtiss Clayton (an acclaimed editor making his helming debut) puts the weight of this strange world on Rick's shoulders, with the mahogany walls of his baroque office closing in on him, and long-dead bigwigs glaring down from musty oil paintings which now hang over desk cubicles and flat-screen computers. And yet Clayton has an ironically light touch with Handler's very black wit, giving the film an alluring pitch of unsettling laughs throughout the ill-fated events that soon unfold.

Continue reading: Rick Review

Bill Pullman

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Bill Pullman

Date of birth

17th December, 1953

Occupation

Actor

Sex

Male

Height

1.87


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Bill Pullman Movies

Battle of the Sexes Movie Review

Battle of the Sexes Movie Review

A dramatisation of the real-life clash between tennis icons Billie Jean King and Bobby Riggs,...

Independence Day: Resurgence Movie Review

Independence Day: Resurgence Movie Review

Two decades is a long time to wait for a sequel, especially one starring much...

Independence Day: Resurgence - Teaser Trailer

Independence Day: Resurgence - Teaser Trailer

Everyone knows the tale of David Levinson and Captain Steven Hiller, the two men at...

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American Ultra Trailer

American Ultra Trailer

Mike's current life revolves around his girlfriend, a healthy amount of weed and his job...

Cymbeline Trailer

Cymbeline Trailer

In a dark and corrupt world, the rich and powerful are the bad guys, while...

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The Equalizer Movie Review

The Equalizer Movie Review

Little more than a paint-by-numbers action thriller, it's anyone's guess why the filmmakers have bothered...

The Equalizer Trailer

The Equalizer Trailer

Director Antoine Fuqua (Training Day, Olympus Has Fallen) talks about what makes The Equalizer (Denzel...

The Equalizer Trailer

The Equalizer Trailer

Robert McCall has a modest job at a hardware store in Boston where he longs...

The Killer Inside Me Trailer

The Killer Inside Me Trailer

Lou Ford leads -what looks to be a pretty unremarkable existence, he's the deputy Sheriff...

Bottle Shock Trailer

Bottle Shock Trailer

Watch the trailer for Bottle ShockDuring the 1970's there were no wines that could rival...

Surveillance Trailer

Surveillance Trailer

Trailer for Surveillance.Sam Hallaway and Elizabeth Anderson are federal officers at the centre of a...

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