Bill Kenwright

Bill Kenwright

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Bill Kenwright, Vikki Michelle and Edith Sykes - The unveiling ceremony of a Blue Plaque dedicated to Eric Sykes at the house he wrote many of his comedy works with his writing partner, and fellow Blue Plaque recipient, Spike Milligan. - London, United Kingdom - Sunday 7th July 2013

Bill Kenwright, Vikki Michelle and Edith Sykes
Bill Kenwright
Bill Kenwright
Bill Kenwright
Bill Kenwright, Vikki Michelle and Edith Sykes
Bill Kenwright, Vikki Michelle and Edith Sykes

Broken Review


Good

While this strikingly well-made film is a great calling card for rising-star filmmaker Norris, it's also so relentlessly dark and unsettling that it's difficult to see the point of it all. This is such a bleak coming-of-age tale that it almost obscures any hope at all, focussing a series of horrific incidents into a confined space that gives the actors and filmmaker a change to shine, but leaves the audience exhausted.

It's set in a North London cul-de-sac, where the pre-teen Skunk (Laurence) lives with her big brother Jed (Milner), her single dad (Roth) and her nanny Kasia (Marjanovic). But her happy life is thrown into chaos when violence erupts: hotheaded widower Bob (Kinnear) storms across the street and punches simple-minded Rick (Emms), seemingly for no reason, triggering a series of events that Skunk struggles to understand. And Bob's three daughters seem to be just as violent. One (Bryant) is mercilessly bullying Skunk at school, while another (Daveney) is seducing Jed.

The way so many story elements circle around Skunk makes the film feel almost like a stage play. Everyone is so interconnected that we wonder if much of this exists only in her mind. For example, Kasia has just started a relationship with Skunk's schoolteacher (Murphy), who has been accused of abusing one of Bob's daughters. And there are even more issues that put Skunk in both emotional and physical peril, including a new boyfriend (Sergeant) who might have to move away and the fact that she has Type 1 diabetes. And Skunk's world seems to be limited to her street and a junkyard across the field.

Continue reading: Broken Review

Bill Kenwright and Jenny Seagrove - Bill Kenwright and Jenny Seagrove Sunday 19th February 2012 Whatsonstage.com Awards Concert held at the Prince of Wales Theatre - Arrivals

Bill Kenwright and Jenny Seagrove
Bill Kenwright

Bill Kenwright and Jekyll And Hyde Monday 31st January 2011 attends a photocall for the launch for the UK tour of 'Jekyll and Hyde' at the Royal Institute of Great Britain. London, England

Bill Kenwright and Jekyll And Hyde
Bill Kenwright and Jekyll And Hyde
Bill Kenwright and Jekyll And Hyde

Die, Mommie, Die Review


Excellent
Charles Busch loves the movies. More specifically, he loves the grand dames of classic American cinema. He loves them so much that he likes to dress up like them and retell their best stories with campy humor. Just try to count the movies from which he has borrowed bits and pieces to build Die, Mommie, Die, and try to count the actresses he channels. You'll notice bits of Bette Davis, Joan Crawford, Jane Wyman, Rosalind Russell, and even Susan Hayward's memorable Helen Lawson from Valley of the Dolls.

The movies? Sunset Boulevard; Hush, Hush, Sweet Charlotte; Whatever Happened to Baby Jane?; Bette Davis's spooky/nutty 1964 thriller Dead Ringer; and every picture directed by Douglas Sirk are just a few of Busch's touchstones.

Continue reading: Die, Mommie, Die Review

Zoe Review


Good
Think of it as Stand by She.

This all-female road movie/coming-of-age movie improves dramatically on the last attempt at this genre -- the Britney Spears vehicle Crossroads -- but unfortunately once Zoe (Vanessa Zima) loses her punk friends and hooks up with a British woman named Cecilia (Jenny Seagrove) and her cremated mother, the film loses some of its luster.

Continue reading: Zoe Review

Die, Mommie, Die Review


Excellent
Charles Busch loves the movies. More specifically, he loves the grand dames of classic American cinema. He loves them so much that he likes to dress up like them and retell their best stories with campy humor. Just try to count the movies from which he has borrowed bits and pieces to build Die, Mommie, Die, and try to count the actresses he channels. You'll notice bits of Bette Davis, Joan Crawford, Jane Wyman, Rosalind Russell, and even Susan Hayward's memorable Helen Lawson from Valley of the Dolls.

The movies? Sunset Boulevard; Hush, Hush, Sweet Charlotte; Whatever Happened to Baby Jane?; Bette Davis's spooky/nutty 1964 thriller Dead Ringer; and every picture directed by Douglas Sirk are just a few of Busch's touchstones.

Continue reading: Die, Mommie, Die Review

Bill Kenwright

Bill Kenwright Quick Links

News Pictures Film RSS
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Filmmaker


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Bill Kenwright Movies

Broken Movie Review

Broken Movie Review

While this strikingly well-made film is a great calling card for rising-star filmmaker Norris, it's...

Die, Mommie, Die Movie Review

Die, Mommie, Die Movie Review

Charles Busch loves the movies. More specifically, he loves the grand dames of classic American...

Advertisement
Die, Mommie, Die Movie Review

Die, Mommie, Die Movie Review

Charles Busch loves the movies. More specifically, he loves the grand dames of classic American...

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