Bill Irwin

Bill Irwin

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Who's Your Daddy Trailer


Peter and Kyle Reynolds have always been close brothers, not only are they twins but a family loss at a young age also made them closer. The man are now grown up now and their mother (Helen) is about to re-marry. Her two sons travel to her wedding and she decides to tell her boys the truth behind what happened to their father. 

From a young age Peter and Kyle have both believed that they lost their father to colon cancer and as such, Peter even formed his career around his father's illness as a way of dedication to his memory. What their mother tells them takes them both by surprise; she doesn't actually know who their dad is, he could be one of many people that she had a relationship with.

The brothers set off on a mission to find out who their dad really is, there's a famous sport star and a tattooed hothead (who Kyle feels is quite similar to Peter) both of whom might tell the brothers more information about their mom than they ever need to know.

Bill Irwin - NYC Special Screening of HBO Film 'Confirmation' at Signature Theater - Arrivals - New York, New York, United States - Thursday 7th April 2016

Bill Irwin
Bill Irwin
Bill Irwin
Bill Irwin
Bill Irwin
Bill Irwin

Bill Irwin - Photographs from the red carpet as a vast array of stars arrived for the World Premiere of Disney's film musical 'Into The Woods' which was held at the Ziegfeld Theatre in New York City, New York, United States - Tuesday 9th December 2014

Bill Irwin

Video - Matthew McConaughey Leads Arrivals At 'Interstellar' NY Premiere - Part 1


'Interstellar''s lead star Matthew Mcconaughey was seen arriving at the movie's premiere at AMC Loews Lincoln Square theater in New York alongside his wife Camila Alves. McConaughey plays Cooper in Christopher Nolan's forthcoming sci-fi action flick which has been one of the most highly anticipated movies of the year.

Continue: Video - Matthew McConaughey Leads Arrivals At 'Interstellar' NY Premiere - Part 1

Interstellar Trailer


Mankind is doomed. Following generations of neglect and a lack of care, the planet Earth is a polluted mess and food supplies have all but run out. Only one hope remains for humanity if it is to survive into its next generation - they must leave Earth behind. Cooper (Matthew Mcconaughey), is a widowed engineer, living in a time where engineers are no longer needed. He also happens to be one of the world's best pilots. He is offered the choice to stay with his children and except the fate of the human race, or captain a mission through a newly discovered wormhole in search of a new, habitable planet which can sustain the prolonged existence of our species. He chooses the latter option, and begins his interstellar travels in search of a new home. 

Continue: Interstellar Trailer

Interstellar Trailer


Cooper is a pilot and engineer with a huge ambition to save the world. With little discoveries left to be made on Earth and the development of pioneering technology ever slowing down, mankind's only chance of survival is to take to the stars - though there's a chance there's nothing out there either. But human endeavour once again proves fruitful as a team of space explorers discover a wormhole in the void of the universe. Cooper decides to join them on their intergalactic expedition to find out if there are any other habitable worlds out there. However, he has a big decision to make as the trip means leaving his beloved family behind with the possibility that he might never return. This is a dangerous mission unlike anything mankind has ever done before, but is it worth it to find a way to save the world?

Continue: Interstellar Trailer

Interstellar Trailer


With the Earth facing a bleak future, pilot and engineer Cooper wants to know how it can possibly be saved from its inevitable demise. The world seems to be slowing down in terms of technological advancement and important discovery, but one group of scientists and explorers are determined to keep pushing the boundaries of human endeavour in the hope that human beings can learned enough to save themselves. When an unusual wormhole like void is discovered in space, the scientists prepare to embark on an interstellar voyage of wisdom to unlock the hidden mysteries of the universe and uncover the key to time travel. It's an expedition that faces great danger and has never before been undertaken by man, and while Cooper is concerned about his separation from his family, he can't pass up this opportunity to explore the stars.

Continue: Interstellar Trailer

Interstellar Trailer


At a time where scientists and explorers are on the verge of reaching a stalemate with making new discoveries and extending the limits of human endeavour, a group of ever-curious space explorers uncover a wormhole in the universe that can allow them to make critical shortcuts through spacetime. The team set out on an intergalactic expedition never before untaken by man, to find whole new worlds of new discoveries, hidden dimensions and unearth the key to time travel.

Continue: Interstellar Trailer

Bill Irwin Monday 27th February 2012 Opening night after party for 'Hurt Village' at Signature Theatre Company’s Pershing Square Signature Center - Arrivals

Bill Irwin
Bill Irwin

Bill Irwin Friday 1st May 2009 Drama Desk Nominees Cocktail Party held at Il Bastardo Ristorante New York City, USA

Bill Irwin

Rachel Getting Married Review


Very Good
Anne Hathaway looks like a movie star, but more often than not acts like a studious, earnest head of the class. Rather than filtering characters through some kind of star persona or actorly invention, she does what is required with such technical precision that her performances lose any spark of spontaneity (that's why she didn't get any laughs playing Agent 99 in Get Smart; she somehow managed to play the straight woman role too straight).

But something happens in Jonathan Demme's Rachel Getting Married. Hathaway plays Kym, the black sheep of an upper-middle-class Connecticut family who has left rehab in time to attend her sister Rachel's wedding. This isn't simply a case of an actress obviously playing against type, although she clearly is. Hathaway teases her studiousness out into self-centered, self-destructive prickliness; Kym is like a teacher's pet, begging to be rewarded for her self-aware (but caustic and uncomfortable) humor, and her self-serious (yet somehow pompous) parroting of Narcotics Anonymous wisdom.

Continue reading: Rachel Getting Married Review

Dark Matter Review


Very Good
In his feature-film debut, well-regarded Chinese opera director Chen Shi-Zheng makes a strong impression with Dark Matter, the story of a Chinese cosmology genius invited to America to join the team of a legendary cosmologist only to find that America isn't quite the land of opportunity that he had been brought up to believe. Based on the true story of a Chinese student who went ballistic at a major American university in the early '90s, Shi-Zheng's film, which originally premiered at last year's Sundance Film Festival, was held from release after the shootings at Virginia Tech last April. Now, only a few days before the anniversary of the Virginia Tech massacre, it would seem the pushback, though well-meaning, was useless.

Broken into five acts represented by symbols of the five elements, the film begins with Liu Xing (a very good Liu Ye) walking into a Western university to meet and join legendary cosmology theorist Jacob Reiser (Aidan Quinn). Funded by socialite Joanna Silver (Meryl Streep), an avatar of America's fetishizing of Eastern tradition, Liu is invited to experience monuments of fake Americana (a mock ghost town) and droll bits of Chinese history. Her husband (Bill Irwin) sees it simply as a tax write-off, but Joanna has a deep want for things outside her closeted realm.

Continue reading: Dark Matter Review

Bill Irwin and Edward Albee - Bill Irwin & Daryl Roth New York City, USA - Opening Night of Edward Albee's 'Peter and Jerry' at the Second Stage Theatre - Arrivals Sunday 11th November 2007

Bill Irwin and Edward Albee

How The Grinch Stole Christmas (2000) Review


Very Good
How the Grinch Stole Christmas (a film which should otherwise need no introduction whatsoever) reminds me of that strange Christmas feeling that hits about five minutes after all of the presents have been opened. It's that indescribable longing for more, even if nothing's really missing. There's so much expectation, so much buildup, that somehow even though you're satisfied, it's not quite enough.

Jim Carrey is fabulous as the titular Grinch, that much is sure. His trademark physical antics fit "the mean one" perfectly, without stealing the heart from one of Dr. Seuss' most notorious characters. He proves that he's up to the tall order of balancing two larger-than-life personalities: himself and the Grinch. The delicate mix that Carrey strikes -- giving just enough of himself to the role without obliterating the creature in the process -- is really the beauty of his performance.

Continue reading: How The Grinch Stole Christmas (2000) Review

Lady In The Water Review


Good
Is it possible for a film to be cheesy and interesting all at once? That's the question posed by M. Night Shyamalan's latest effort, Lady in the Water, a film that manages to throw in enough twists and turns to keep you engaged until the last schmaltzy drop.The film begins, appropriately enough, with a fable. A cave-painting style animation lays the groundwork for the fairy tale that's about to play out in a sleepy apartment complex called The Cove. After this ultimately unnecessary introduction, we meet Cleveland Heep (Paul Giamatti), caretaker of the complex, and a gaggle of eccentric residents. One night Cleveland spies someone in the residential pool who isn't supposed to be there. Slipping and falling in, he's saved from drowning by the mysterious stranger, a young woman named Story (Bryce Dallas Howard). Like its heart, the film wears its post-modernism on its sleeve.Through a legend meted out in fits and starts by an elderly, vaguely stereotypical Chinese woman and her daughter, Cleveland learns that this woman is, in fact, a narf, which is not, as one might suspect, some kind of undercover DEA pixie, but is instead a water nymph meant to bring great change and awakening and yadda, yadda, yadda. But before you can say "ancient Chinese secret," Cleveland finds out that there are monsters in this legend, as well, and must spend the rest of the film trying to negotiate safe passage home for Story by enlisting help from the motley tenants.Finding out who these helpers are and just how they will help is part of the fun and frustration of the film. Although Shyamalan manages to find neat and clever ways to fit them into his puzzle, the puzzle itself seems to be manufactured as the film progresses. Every ten or fifteen minutes, the plot stops so that the woman and her daughter can, in often clumsy exposition, reveal another part of the myth that they inexplicably left out before. A game like this is much less fun if it seems like the rules are just being made up as you go along.At the same time, the elements that make for any good Shyamalan film are here. There are very few directors (Spielberg and Scorsese among them) who virtually shot for shot find the most interesting place to put the camera, and Shyamalan is one. He also knows how to cast a film, and Giamatti's performance here ranks easily with Willis' in The Sixth Sense or Gibson's in Signs. In what should be one of the film's most saccharine moments, he delivers a nearly tear-worthy speech.Which brings us, inevitably, to the cheese. Being a fairy tale, Lady in the Water is susceptible to moments of artifice, and with lines like "The great Elon is coming," it can be hard not to chuckle. On the other hand, writers like Joss Whedon manage to bring the fanciful into the modern without taking the viewer out of the moment (and it would be very interesting to see him write and Shyamalan direct a project like this).There is maybe half of a great film here. In many ways, this is Shyamalan's Close Encounters, in which in an ordinary man discovers he's living in an extraordinary world. And many of the themes of faith, purpose, and self-discovery explored in Signs and The Sixth Sense are all touched upon here, but are posited in a far less convincing way. Lady in the Water is not without its magical moments, but you really have to want them.Let's narf tonight!
Bill Irwin

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Bill Irwin Movies

Who's Your Daddy Trailer

Who's Your Daddy Trailer

Peter and Kyle Reynolds have always been close brothers, not only are they twins but...

Interstellar Trailer

Interstellar Trailer

Mankind is doomed. Following generations of neglect and a lack of care, the planet Earth...

Interstellar Trailer

Interstellar Trailer

Cooper is a pilot and engineer with a huge ambition to save the world. With...

Interstellar Trailer

Interstellar Trailer

With the Earth facing a bleak future, pilot and engineer Cooper wants to know how...

Interstellar Trailer

Interstellar Trailer

At a time where scientists and explorers are on the verge of reaching a stalemate...

Rachel Getting Married Movie Review

Rachel Getting Married Movie Review

Anne Hathaway looks like a movie star, but more often than not acts like a...

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How the Grinch Stole Christmas (2000) Movie Review

How the Grinch Stole Christmas (2000) Movie Review

How the Grinch Stole Christmas (a film which should otherwise need no introduction whatsoever) reminds...

Lady in the Water Movie Review

Lady in the Water Movie Review

Is it possible for a film to be cheesy and interesting all at once? That's...

How the Grinch Stole Christmas Movie Review

How the Grinch Stole Christmas Movie Review

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The Manchurian Candidate Movie Review

The Manchurian Candidate Movie Review

Director Jonathan Demme's remake of "The Manchurian Candidate" is eerily effective in bringing the 1962...

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