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Exodus: Gods and Kings Review


OK

Aside from impressive 21st century digital effects, this new take on the Moses story pales in comparison to Cecil B. DeMille's iconic 1956 version, The Ten Commandments, which is far more resonant and intensely dramatic. Biblical epics are tricky to get right, and Ridley Scott certainly knows how to make them look and feel terrific (see Gladiator and Kingdom of Heaven), but his films are generally about the spectacle rather than the human emotion. So this version of the biblical story will only appeal to viewers who have never seen a better one.

It's set in 1300 BC, when the Israelites have been in captivity in Egypt for 400 years. Now rumours of liberation are circling, centring on Moses (Christian Bale), the adopted son of Pharaoh Seti (John Turturro), raised as a brother alongside the future Pharaoh Ramses (Joel Edgerton). When it emerges that Moses is actually a Hebrew, he is sent into exile in the desert, where he finds a new calling as a shepherd and marries his new boss' sexy daughter Sefora (Maria Valverde). Moses also has a run-in with the Jewish God, who appears in the form of a young boy (Isaac Andrews), challenging Moses to free the Israelites. As Moses attempts to spark a slave revolt, God sends seven horrific plagues to convince Ramses to let his people go.

The script struggles to have its cake and eat it too, finding rational explanations for the plagues and miracles while still maintaining God's supernatural intervention. It's a rather odd mix that demonstrates just how compromised the movie is: it's a big blockbuster rather than a story about people. Several elements work well, such as depicting God as a boy, although the screenplay never manages to make much of the female characters. And only Ben Mendelsohn manages to inject any proper personality as the weaselly overseer of the slaves. Bale and Edgerton both catch the complexity of their characters' situations, privilege mixed with personal revelations. But Scott is more interested in parting the Red Sea than taking them anywhere very interesting.

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Accepted Review


Grim
On paper, there's little doubt that the idea of combining Animal House and Camp Nowhere sounded like a good idea. Both films are entertaining, though the former obviously much more than the latter. Not too surprisingly, Accepted takes the scant mundane parts of Animal House and pastes them on the Camp Nowhere plot, and then decides to throw in a little Van Wilder for old time's sake. If you saw any of these films, expect an uneasy feeling of recycling.

Bartleby (Justin Long) is a clever high school student, but not specifically good at working. He can trick people and has an unnatural ability with words, but he can't get into a college to save his life. Several of his fellow friends and classmates are finding the same problem. After a failed plan to trick his parents, Bartleby decides that the only way to quell his parents' worries is to get an acceptance letter from a fake college. So, on a whim, he and a pack of ravenously creative friends set up a website, buy a space, remodel it, and make it look about as college-like as possible. It works for Bartleby's parents, but soon, hundreds of students are at the gates of the school, ready to learn.

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New York Minute Review


Grim
Mary-Kate and Ashley Olsen - the artists formerly known as the Olsen twins - celebrate their pending legality with a calculated bid for a larger movie following. Celebrities since their diaper days on Full House, the Olsens have over a dozen direct-to-video titles in their money-making repertoire but have yet to foist a feature-length film on to the multiplex masses.

Tailored specifically for packs of prepubescent girls, New York Minute will be eye candy for some and brain candy for all. It casts the camera-friendly siblings in a frothy Ferris Bueller-inspired day in the life of twin sisters spinning in opposite circles. Prim and proper Jane Ryan (Ashley) preps to give a speech at Columbia University that could earn her an Oxford scholarship. Slacker sister Roxy Ryan (Mary-Kate) just wants to skip school and stay one step ahead of a power-hungry truant officer (Eugene Levy) with cop envy.

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