Bijou Phillips

Bijou Phillips

Bijou Phillips Quick Links

News Pictures Video Film Quotes RSS

World Peace hosts the 13th Annual Day of the Child held at Star Eco Station in Culver City

Destenee and Bijou Phillips Sunday 13th November 2011 World Peace hosts the 13th Annual Day of the Child held at Star Eco Station in Culver City California, USA

Destenee and Bijou Phillips

World Peace hosts the 13th Annual Day of the Child held at Star Eco Station in Culver City

Bijou Phillips Sunday 13th November 2011 World Peace hosts the 13th Annual Day of the Child held at Star Eco Station in Culver City California, USA

Bijou Phillips
Bijou Phillips

Calvin Klein Collection & Los Angeles Nomadic Division (LAND) 1st Annual Celebration For L.A. Arts Monthly and Art Los Angeles Contemporary (ALAC) - Arrivals

Bijou Phillips Thursday 28th January 2010 Calvin Klein Collection & Los Angeles Nomadic Division (LAND) 1st Annual Celebration For L.A. Arts Monthly and Art Los Angeles Contemporary (ALAC) - Arrivals Los Angeles, California

Bijou Phillips
Bijou Phillips
Bijou Phillips
Bijou Phillips
Bijou Phillips

Hostel: Part II Review


Unbearable
Let's lay the cards on the table: Hostel, to me, was one of the coldest, most blindly-conceived horror films to get released in years, basically acting as torture porn rather than an actual film. So, the fact that Hostel: Part II is more thuggishly ambivalent to thought and structure, more cold and condescending to its audience and its characters, and more wildly absurd in both tone and execution doesn't come as a surprise. To be honest, it makes sense that after two thoroughly fascinating horror experiments (Bug and 28 Weeks Later) are released that Hostel: Part II will easily make enough money to secure a third installment and will set the horror genre back a solid decade.

Basically, Part II is Hostel plus a B-cup. Three girls (Lauren German, Bijou Phillips, and Heather Matarazzo) are in Europe studying art. One of the models for the art course is a statuesque beauty (Vera Jordanova) who befriends the girls and starts a friendship with one girl that borders on lesbianism. Of course, the model gets them to go to a special hot springs and stay at a hostel. Shortly after arriving, the girls are drugged, dragged, and prepped for a slab or a death seat.

Continue reading: Hostel: Part II Review

Havoc Review


OK
Eventually, every girl grows up. Cinema dictates this. Sometimes, that move into adulthood is seamless (see Jodie Foster, Claire Danes, Scarlett Johanssen, Kirsten Dunst). Sometimes it is agonizingly painful (see the Olsen twins, Hilary Duff, and -- arguably -- Drew Barrymore).

Sometimes it is as curious as all get-out (see Anne Hathaway in Havoc). I don't know if I've ever seen a more radical departure of film roles than Hathaway's decision to go from the Princess Diaries films to this one. Hathaway's former work is almost unilaterally square in the rated-G realm. Her PG-rated movies earned those ratings primarily due to events like Hathaway falling on her butt.

Continue reading: Havoc Review

Havoc Review


OK
Eventually, every girl grows up. Cinema dictates this. Sometimes, that move into adulthood is seamless (see Jodie Foster, Claire Danes, Scarlett Johanssen, Kirsten Dunst). Sometimes it is agonizingly painful (see the Olsen twins, Hilary Duff, and -- arguably -- Drew Barrymore).

Sometimes it is as curious as all get-out (see Anne Hathaway in Havoc). I don't know if I've ever seen a more radical departure of film roles than Hathaway's decision to go from the Princess Diaries films to this one. Hathaway's former work is almost unilaterally square in the rated-G realm. Her PG-rated movies earned those ratings primarily due to events like Hathaway falling on her butt.

Continue reading: Havoc Review

Black And White (1999) Review


OK
A very unique and brutal subculture exists in America these days. It's a strange juxtaposition of harsh street life and uber-materialistic greed tempered with a sense of justifiability from a code of unwritten ethics. The world is that of the gangsta rappers, the ghetto boys, and the thug-life advocators that dominate the world of hip-hop and rap music. Black and White, the latest film by James Toback, explores this subculture that grows stronger with every new generation it affects.

The hardest thing about an outsider trying to infiltrate a subculture and explain it to the masses is that the truth is often lost in the translation. Toback throws together a huge canvas of characters and actors in attempt to create a clear picture of why white kids are motivated to impersonate black rappers' lifestyles and why rich whit guys treat black rappers like Arnold and Willis from Diff'rent Strokes.

Continue reading: Black And White (1999) Review

Bully Review


Excellent
Larry Clark -- who wrote and directed his first film, Kids, at the tender age of 52 and in the process, broke the mold about what we should expect from a movie about teenagers -- returns to familiar ground in Bully, a striking and harrowing follow-up.

A slam-dunk natural subject for Clark, Bully follows the based-on-reality story of Marty Puccio (Brad Renfro), who along with his girlfriend Lisa (Rachel Miner) decides to brutally slay his "best friend" Bobby (Nick Stahl) as payback for a lifetime of abuse. Set in the ultra-trashy nether regions of southern Florida -- and I mean seriously, beyond-WWF trashy -- there's little to do but drive your car, play video games, have sex, and beat the crap out of your friends.

Continue reading: Bully Review

Fast Sofa Review


Grim
I found Fast Sofa, the novel, in the discount bin in early 1994, intrigued that it came with a 45-rpm vinyl soundtrack attached right into the binding. The story, about an L.A.-livin', heavy metal obsessive named Rick who takes an odd (and pretty short) road trip, most notably visiting his favorite porn star, Ginger, in Palm Springs.

Amusing enough, and a quick read. And Fast Sofa, the movie, keeps the guts of this road trip intact -- enough to realize that our pal Rick is on a real road to nowhere. Jake Busey makes for a creepy and considerably miscast hero, though Jennifer Tilly's wanton Ginger is enough fun for the both of them. Stealing the show, however, is Crispin Glover, as a shut-in sophisticate named Julian who tags along on the latter half of Rick's abortive journey. His outfit alone is reason enough to rent the tape.

Continue reading: Fast Sofa Review

The Door in the Floor Review


Grim
Adapted from the first third of John Irving's sprawling novel A Widow For One Year, Tod Williams' The Door in the Floor is a high-minded piece of manipulative melodramatic bunk (with a horrible title) that rides a rising crest of pretension before splashing moviegoers down into a cold bath of self-indulgent faux tragedy. The story of an unhappy couple who welcome, with calamitous consequences, a young teen into their lives during a summer at their beachfront home, it's a disingenuous film that deals in the upper-class ennui and sorrow of The Ice Storm and Moonlight Mile, desperately clinging to an affected pose of photogenic misery but failing to even approximate reasonable human emotion or behavior.

Eccentric children's book author and womanizer Ted Cole (an adequately flaky Jeff Bridges) lost his two sons in a car accident years ago, and though he and his wife Marion (Kim Basinger) have relocated to a quaint New Hampshire town and attempted to fill the void in their lives by having daughter Ruth (Elle Fanning), they're still reeling from their family catastrophe and poised to separate. In a supremely idiotic decision, Ted hires Eddie (Jon Foster), a young student from Phillips Exeter Academy who looks just like his deceased oldest son, to be his assistant. However, the freewheeling writer - whose hipness is supposedly confirmed by his penchant for walking around naked in front of others, making erotic sketches of his mistress Mrs. Vaughn (Mimi Rogers), and listening to skanky hip-hop before watching Girls Gone Wild - makes a grave mistake by having the kid work during the day at his wife's nearby apartment. Eddie takes a masturbatory liking to Marion's bra and panties, and when he's caught in the act of self-gratification by the female object of his desire, she's all too willing to accommodate his Mrs. Robinson-patterned longings.

Continue reading: The Door in the Floor Review

Venom Review


Unbearable
The last time Jim Gillespie and Kevin Williamson collaborated on a movie was I Know What You Did Last Summer, a film in which the only redeeming values were Jennifer Love Hewitt's heaving bosoms.

It shouldn't have been that way. In 1997, Williamson was the writer who was going to resuscitate the horror flick, having just come off the massive success of Scream. As a result, there was huge anticipation surrounding his follow-up script, Summer, and raging disappointment when it featured none of the pop culture savvy and originality of Scream. Williamson's career hasn't fully recovered.

Continue reading: Venom Review

Tart Review


Grim
Misleading title alert!

Not only does the provocative title of Tart mislead us, but the packaging features a lithe Dominique Swain on its covers, her schoolgirl skirt blowing up to expose her panties. The tagline: "Sex, Drugs and Study Hall."

Continue reading: Tart Review

Almost Famous Review


OK

Writer-director Cameron Crowe's fond fictionalization of his first assignmentfor Rolling Stone -- as a 15-year-old cub reporter in 1973 -- "Almost Famous" is a vividly realized labor of love and an absolute pleasure to watch.

Having gestated in Crowe's fertile mind since before "SayAnything," his 1989 directorial debut, it's a born crowd-pleaser honedinto an entertaining cinematic paragon of rock 'n' roll that boasts sharpperformances from a sublime cast, speaking page after page of Crowe's uniquebrand of intrinsically quotable, yet seemingly true-to-life dialogue.

A winning young actor named PatrickFugit -- who prior to being cast had only twoepisodes of "Touched By An Angel" on his resume -- carries themovie as William Miller, the director's mop-topped alter-ego. Like Crowehimself, William gets his start as a rock journalist by being taken underthe wing of Lester Bangs (Philip Seymour Hoffman), a jaded but passionatemusic reporter for the fanzine Creem.

Continue reading: Almost Famous Review

Bijou Phillips

Bijou Phillips Quick Links

News Pictures Video Film Quotes RSS