ace baiting among the Big Brother residents, which CBS had earlier deleted from the condensed primetime version of the show (it is carried live online virtually nonstop), has apparently given the reality series a big boost. Thursday night's episode attracted 6.15 million viewers, up from 5.42 million a week ago. That show had also seen a 10-percent ratings rise from the previous week. This morning (Friday) the TMZ celebrity website headlined Big Brother Race War Explodes. The website described the remarks of contestant Aaryn Gries to a black female contestant on Thursday as disgusting and vile -- a callback to a white slavemaster talking to a slave on a plantation. Earlier in the week, New York Times TV writer Brian Stelter noted that a lot has changed since the network in 2000 stated that it would not tolerate nor permit any hate speech on the program. Said Stelter: Since then, reality has intruded. This summer, in the show's 15th iteration, several participants have been overheard making racist, sexist and homophobic comments about others in the house, and in the process they have reignited the oldest debate in reality television: whether the show's producers are appropriately and fairly depicting real life in their quest to provoke and entertain viewers.