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The Hobbit world premiere

Bernard Hill - The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies' film premiere - London, United Kingdom - Monday 1st December 2014

'The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies' world premiere

Bernard Hill - 'The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies' world premiere - Arrivals at Odeon Leicester Square - London, United Kingdom - Monday 1st December 2014

Filming on the set of 'From There To Here'

Philip Glenister and Bernard Hill - Filming on the set of BBC's three-part drama 'From There To Here' which looks at the devastating aftermath of the IRA bombing on Manchester in 1996 - Manchester, United Kingdom - Friday 4th October 2013

Philip Glenister and Liz White
Philip Glenister and Steven Mackintosh
Philip Glenister
Philip Glenister and Steven Mackintosh
Philip Glenister, Liz White, Bernard Hill and Steven Mackintosh

Bernard Hill at the premiere of "The Hobbit: An unexpected journey" at Odeon, Leicester Square, London, England

Bernard Hill, The Hobbit, An, Odeon, Leicester Square, London and England Wednesday 12th December 2012 Bernard Hill at the premiere of "The Hobbit: An unexpected journey" at Odeon, Leicester Square, London, England

Paranorman Trailer


Norman Babcock is an unpopular kid who has a strange ability: he can talk to the dead. Normally, this unusual talent wouldn't come in useful in everyday life but Norman lives in a town that has a centuries old curse put on it.

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The Kid Review


OK
Based on a true story, this gripping film features solid acting and a strong visual sensibility. And even though the plot meanders, it's an important story of someone who survived a severe failure in the British child welfare system.

Kevin Lewis (Miller, Prew, then Friend) was born in South London into a violent home in which his sharp wit sparks extra physical abuse from his mother (McElhone), while his drunken father (O'Neill) either watches helplessly or is bullied into taking part. But along the way Kevin finds compassion from a care home manager (Hill), an alert teacher (Gruffudd), a compassionate foster father (Fox) and a supportive girlfriend (Whittaker). But all of this could be undone by his dodgy business decisions.

Continue reading: The Kid Review

Franklyn Review


Grim

Have you ever experienced something that is simultaneously both admirable and annoying? Bono engaging the Pope on contraception, perhaps. Or maybe Ernest Vincent Wright's 'Gadsby' - a book written in its entirety without the letter 'e'? Well, Gerald Mcmorrow's 'Franklyn' very much falls into this category, occasionally even approximating those transcendental nadirs of irritation such as when, in the erstwhile example, John Paul II actually donned Bono's 'fly shades' for that most unholy of photo ops

The film is composed of four story strands each centring on a different character. Sam Riley plays Milo, a heartbroken young rake recently jilted at the altar. Eva Green is the panda-eyed goth-artist, Emilia, an enfant terrible railing against her mother and university course via the production of macabre videos of her various suicide attempts. Bernard 'gizza job' Hill plays Peter Esser, a church warden searching for his missing son and Ryan Phillipe is Preest a sack-masked vigilante battling his way against the state officials of the Meanwhile City theocracy.

Continue reading: Franklyn Review

Franklyn Trailer


Watch the trailer for Franklyn.

Continue: Franklyn Trailer

Shirley Valentine Review


OK
As a one-woman play, Shirley Valentine wowed them on both sides of the Atlantic, with star Pauline Collins picking up awards and accolades. The film version strives for the same kind of theater-style intimacy, with Collins breaking the fourth wall to chat with the audience just as she did on stage. It doesn't always work, but few other chick flicks have the ability to make middle-aged women laugh and cry as much as this one does.

Pity poor Shirley Valentine-Bradshaw, a blowsy mid-40ish Liverpudlian housewife whose indifferent husband Joe (Bernard Hill) and sullen daughter treat her like hired help. So lonely is Shirley that she frequently talks to her kitchen walls in order to keep some kind of conversation going.

Continue reading: Shirley Valentine Review

The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King Review


Excellent
Peter Jackson returns with his third and final installment in The Lord of the Rings trilogy with the explosive - and exhausting - conclusion to his acclaimed series. Let's cut to the chase: Jackson's final entry is the best of the series, largely thanks to his pushing the boundaries of digital effects to their very limits.

Picking up after a flashback to Sméagol/Gollum's discovery of the ring many years earlier, the film then takes us back to the twin stories from Fellowship andThe Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers: Gandalf (Ian McKellen) and company are basking in the glory of victory at Helm's Deep and Isengard, while Frodo (Elijah Wood), Sam (Sean Astin), and Gollum trek toward Mount Doom to destroy the ring.

Continue reading: The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King Review

Gothika Review


Weak
Having won her Oscar, banged Bond, played a superhero, and had her scrapes with the tabloids, there was only one glaring omission in Halle Berry's Hollywood resume (besides making her London theatrical debut), and that is: horror movie scream queen. Sure, Gothika's not Scream or Halloween 17: Chucky's Divorcee - there's a little more to it than that - but a good part of Ms. Berry's screen time is taken up with flailing her arms and screaming wildly while being pinned down by mental health aides and an injection-happy nurse. All in all, she's quite successful at it; this may not seem like the highest praise, but since you never quite know what kind of manure the studios are going to try and pass off as a horror or thriller flick these days, one has to lower the bar.

Gothika does its damn best to convince us that Berry, as Miranda Grey, is quite the serious prison therapist, sitting straight-faced through her sessions with insane convict Chloe Sava. (That's more than the audience can do, watching poor Penélope Cruz, as Chloe, actually try to act.) Dour-faced as she is, Grey seems to love her job, having a loving husband (Charles S. Dutton) as her boss at the women's prison, and a funny co-worker (Robert Downey Jr) who has a pretty serious crush on her. Then, driving home one rainy night, she crashes her car to avoid a girl standing in the rain. She then walks up to the crazed-looking girl, who then bursts into flames. Grey wakes up in one of the observation cells at the prison three days later, unsure if what happened was a dream, only to be told that she's been there three days and that she killed her husband.

Continue reading: Gothika Review

The Scorpion King Review


Unbearable
The Rock: One name symbolizes everything that can be defined as the stereotypical American male. Why? He's a gruff, tough-as-nails, merciless, and sexually magnetic savior of the free world. And he's huge on TV. And sure enough, The Scorpion King - the latest installment in the mind-numbing, insanely profitable Mummy series - is pure trash. Starring the aforementioned WWF superstar, The Scorpion King is filmmaking at its worst.

The Scorpion King ably rehashes the plots of the variety of other, better films including Gladiator, the Indiana Jones series, Flash Gordon, Beastmaster, and even The Goonies. Set 5,000 years ago, a warlord named Memnon (Steven Brand), acting on crazed Napoleonic urges, ravages the land and bends its people into totalitarian rule. With the aid of a seer who foretells the future, Memnon stands invincible against all aggressors.

Continue reading: The Scorpion King Review

The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King Review


Excellent
Peter Jackson returns with his third and final installment in The Lord of the Rings trilogy with the explosive - and exhausting - conclusion to his acclaimed series. Let's cut to the chase: Jackson's final entry is the best of the series, largely thanks to his pushing the boundaries of digital effects to their very limits.

Picking up after a flashback to Sméagol/Gollum's discovery of the ring many years earlier, the film then takes us back to the twin stories from Fellowship and The Two Towers: Gandalf (Ian McKellen) and company are basking in the glory of victory at Helm's Deep and Isengard, while Frodo (Elijah Wood), Sam (Sean Astin), and Gollum trek toward Mount Doom to destroy the ring.

Continue reading: The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King Review

True Crime Review


Good
How'd I miss this one on the big screen? True Crime may have that feel of typical Clint Eastwood-self-promotion, but it is ultimately a considerably gripping meditation on the press and its role in the legal system. While elements feel a bit too much like Dead Man Walking, some excellent performances by Eastwood, Leary, and Woods make this a film worth watching. The story can be tepid and predictable at times, but overall it's a credible stab at crafting a legal thriller.
Bernard Hill

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