Ben Vereen

Ben Vereen

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Special Olympics World Games: Los Angeles 2015 - Celebrity Dance Challenge

Ben Vereen , Paula Abdul - Special Olympics World Games: Los Angeles 2015 - Celebrity Dance Challenge at the Wallis Annenberg Center for the Performing Arts - Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 1st August 2015

Ben Vereen
Ben Vereen
Ben Vereen and Paula Abdul

2015 Tony Awards - Red Carpet Arrivals

Ben Vereen and guest - 2015 Tony Awards - Red Carpet Arrivals at Radio City Music Hall, Tony Awards - New York City, United States - Sunday 7th June 2015

Ben Vereen

American Theatre Wing's 69th Annual Tony Awards

Ben Vereen - American Theatre Wing's 69th Annual Tony Awards at Radio City Music Hall - Red Carpet Arrivals at Radio City Music hall, Tony Awards - New York City, New York, United States - Monday 8th June 2015

Ben Vereen

2015 BET Honors

Ben Vereen - A variety of stars were photographed as they took to the red carpet at the 2015 Black Entertainment Television (BET) Honors which were held at the Warner Theatre in Washington, D.C., United States - Saturday 24th January 2015

Ben Vereen
Ben Vereen
Ben Vereen
Karon Vereen and Ben Vereen
Karon Vereen and Ben Vereen

Video - Gabrielle Union Looks Sensational At 'Top Five' NY Premiere - Part 2


Gabrielle Union greets Chris Rock on the red carpet at the New York premiere of their new movie 'Top Five', held at the Ziegfeld Theater. The movie has been written and directed by Rock, who stars as a comedian trying to become an actor.

Continue: Video - Gabrielle Union Looks Sensational At 'Top Five' NY Premiere - Part 2

New York premiere of 'Top Five'

Kabara Vereen and Ben Vereen - Photographs of a variety of stars as they arrived for the the New York premiere of 'Top Five' The premiere was held at the Ziegfeld Theater in New York City, New York, United States - Wednesday 3rd December 2014

Ben Vereen
Ben Vereen
Kabara Vereen and Ben Vereen
Kabara Vereen and Ben Vereen
Ben Vereen

Top Five Trailer


Andre Allen has been voted the Funniest Man in America in his illustrious career as a stand-up comedian. But somehow, he feels there's more to life than just telling jokes to an audience and so he decides to venture into the world of acting, playing the lead role in the 'Hammy The Bear' cop movie series. Unfortunately, that kind of film isn't going to land him any series roles in the future, and with his reality star fiancee Erica begging him to let her air their forthcoming wedding on her show, he's really starting to feel like the A list isn't where he's ever going to be. In a bid to rediscover himself, he lets a journalist into his life to write a story about him, raising some harsh questions about his career and his future along the way.

Continue: Top Five Trailer

Idlewild Review


Excellent
I didn't go into Idlewild expecting to see one of the best films of 2006. In fact, I didn't go into Idlewild, Bryan Barber's bootlegger/gangster musical, with any expectations. Perhaps Universal was equally perplexed. This really isn't a film you can effectively advertise in any traditional sense. The most challenging films are never that easy. Not having read about the film and not being a fan of musicals - the very thought of Moulin Rouge made my bowels quake - I approached Idlewild with apprehension. I'm a fan of Outkast. I've always preferred Andre 3000's quirk and funk to Big Boi's gangsta shuffle, but I came out of Idlewild with a much richer appreciation for the duo's talent.

You don't need to have heard a single song by Outkast to appreciate Idlewild's brilliance. The film has a life - at times almost fantastical - that springs from the screen and pounces and coos in your lap as though it's wooing you. Barber was a video clip director, he cut his teeth on three minute commercials for bands like Outkast, and he's got the polish down so tight it's almost part of the celluloid. At times it can be distracting. Sometimes there is so much happening on screen that you eyes overload and your brain shuts down. You just can't catch it all. But the music - that snaky (perfectly used) synth bass line, that flapping guitar work, the sugary gut punch of the horns - pulls you back into the film like a musical whirlpool.

Continue reading: Idlewild Review

I'll Take You There Review


Good
It only takes a few minutes to see Hal Harley's influence on his frequent starlet Adrienne Shelly in this, her fourth outing as an indie writer/director. This quirky tale -- difficult to explain but easy to follow -- has Ally Sheedy kidnapping a lovelorn Reg Rogers while he tries to get to the girlfriend that just ran off with his best friend. Shelly appears to provide help (and self-help), and a nutty road trip through Sheedy's neo-psychotic past and present ensues. Interesting and sometimes hysterical, but the direction is rather pedestrian and the story, strangely enough, just doesn't come off as that original. Go figure.

All That Jazz Review


Excellent
Now that both Chicago and Cabaret have been dusted off and remounted as seemingly eternal fixtures on Broadway, and the film version of Chicago was such a rousing critical and commercial success, it's a good time to take a look back at one of the stranger entries in the career of choreographer/director Bob Fosse: All That Jazz.

On the surface, the movie is the autobiographical story of Fosse going through a physical/emotional breakdown during the making of the original stage version of Chicago in the mid-1970s. Roy Scheider plays the Fosse stand-in, Joe Gideon, as a pill-popping, compulsively womanizing, perfectionist, son of a bitch who finds happiness only in his work. But Fosse rips apart the standard showbiz puff piece right from the start, by dropping viewers right into the frenzied mess of Gideon's life, and mixing up the already-fractured storyline with a recurring sequence where Gideon talks over his life with a glowing, radiant Muse figure (Jessica Lange).

Continue reading: All That Jazz Review

Roots Review


Excellent
When you think of epic mini-series, what comes to mind? Rich Man, Poor Man? Shogun? More likely than not, it's Roots, the based-on-a-true story tale that spooled over 12 hours and six nights, the story of "an American family," albeit one that began captured in Africa in 1750, then sold into slavery in the U.S. colonies.

Roots begins with Kunta Kinte, emerging from childhood and undergoing warrior training in his tribal homeland. The slavers arrive soon enough, and after a harrowing three-month ride back across the Atlantic, Kunta is sold, becomes Toby under his new master, attempts repeated escapes, and eventually accepts his fate as he settles down with a wife and child. The Revolutionary War comes and goes, and Toby's daughter Kizzy is sold, becoming the mother of her new master's son, known as Chicken George. Chicken George in turn is sent to England to pay off a gambling debt. When he returns home after 14 years, he is a free man. The Civil War arrives, and the rest of the slaves are freed. Soon enough the family faces the perils of vehement racism and the KKK, and Chicken George finally leads his family to safety in a new settlement.

Continue reading: Roots Review

Ben Vereen

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