Ben Gazzara

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New York Premiere of My Week With Marilyn at the Paris Theater

Ben Gazzara Sunday 13th November 2011 New York Premiere of My Week With Marilyn at the Paris Theater New York City, USA

13 Trailer


Vince Ferro is badly in need of money to support his family. His only source of income comes from working low paying construction jobs. One day, Vince overhears a conversation about a recently deceased man, who was about to start a well paid job around the time of his accident. The company the man was about to start working for have apparently not heard the tragic news.

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The Gingold Theatrical Group St. Patrick's Day Gala held at The Players Club

Ben Gazzara and his wife Elke Stuckmann-Gazzara - Ben Gazzara and his wife Elke Stuckmann-Gazzara New York City, USA - The Gingold Theatrical Group St. Patrick's Day Gala held at The Players Club Wednesday 17th March 2010

The Gingold Theatrical Group St. Patrick's Day Gala held at The Players Club

Ben Gazzara Wednesday 17th March 2010 The Gingold Theatrical Group St. Patrick's Day Gala held at The Players Club New York City, USA

at a speclal sneak screening of Nothing But the Truth held at Cinema 2

Ben Gazzara Thursday 13th November 2008 at a speclal sneak screening of Nothing But the Truth held at Cinema 2 New York City, USA

Paris, Je T'aime Review


OK
One would like to think that there at least a few other cities in the world besides Paris that could have inspired a film as varied in the types of cinematic pleasure so ably delivered by the anthology piece Paris Je T'Aime -- but it seems unlikely. This isn't due to an unavailability of good stories or locations in many other great metropolises, but more because being able to dangle the possibility of shooting in Paris in front of the world's greatest directors is going to be so much more enticing. Also, there are few other cities besides Paris that come with such a powerful and multifarious wealth of preassociated images and emotions for both filmmaker and audience to both draw upon and react against. So what could have been a collection of short films with a few highs, several lows, and a lot of muddled in-betweens is in fact a remarkably and consistently imaginative body of work, practically giddy with energy, that only rarely touches the ground.

Project overseers Emmanuel Benbihy and Tristan Carné wanted to create a cinematic map of Paris, with each short film representing one of the city's 20 arrondissements (neighborhoods). They ended up with 18 films, none of them more than a few minutes long and directed by a glittering, international roster of filmmakers. While none of the films here are anything approaching masterpieces, hardly a one is in any way a chore to sit through, which has to be some sort of an accomplishment.

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Road House Review


Terrible
Mike Nelson, in his fantastic book of reviews of awful movies (Mike Nelson's Movie Megacheese), calls Road House "the single finest American film. Certainly it stinks, but I believe the filmmakers meant it to, and succeeded grandly." Road House also made its way into Bad Movies We Love, Edward Marguiles and Stephen Rebello's fine rundown of the worst movies ever made.

As a movie lover, I feel it's important to see the clunkers so I can appreciate the classic stuff. Part of me felt incomplete for not seeing Rowdy Herrington's 1989 anti-classic. When the time came to review it -- so that watching the movie felt somewhat legitimate -- I jumped at the chance. The verdict: In terms of sheer awfulness, I think 13th Child, SuperBabies: Baby Geniuses 2, and House of the Dead beat it. Oh, sure, Road House is bad. It's just not awestruck bad.

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The List Review


Unbearable
Clever adulterous judge/murderous hooker flick or unadulterated crap? (Answer: Unadulterated crap.) Put me to sleep almost immediately.

Broadway: The Golden Age, By The Legends Who Were There Review


OK
Self-indulgent to a fault and brusquely shoved together without much of a sense of rhythm, Broadway: The Golden Age is on the surface the five-year-long quest by filmmaker Rick McKay (Elaine Stritch at Liberty) to interview pretty much every Broadway luminary he could get his hands on, all for the purposes of limning the glory that was Broadway's "Golden Age." Now it's no surprise that you interview a bunch of aging actors/actresses who are in this particular demographic they're going to tell you that things today are rather awful, and in their day, were much, much better. What makes Broadway as engaging as it is would be the fact that McKay's interviewees are able to back up those claims with some rather illuminating anecdotes - and not just all of the "you could go to the automat and get a muffin and coffee for 15 cents" variety, though there's plenty of that as well.

Although McKay - whose irritating narration, the usual guff about moving to New York from Indiana and just how exciting it all was, brackets the film - never really posits what exactly he's on about with "The Golden Age," two things quickly become clear: The time period he and his subjects want to talk about is Broadway theater from the 1930s to the 1950s, and that period really would have been something to behold. The cavalcade of interviewees all point to not just the embarrassment of riches that were around then in terms of both the material (Lerner & Lowe and Rodgers & Hammerstein were like musical hit factories, not to mention the new dramatic work being produced by the likes of Tennessee Williams and Arthur Miller) and the talent, but another very simple factor: It was cheap. In a time of $480 The Producers tickets, it's partially nice but mostly infuriating to know that not so long ago it could cost less to go to a Broadway show than the movies.

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The Thomas Crown Affair (1999) Review


Excellent
Ah, the perils of being a billionaire these days. Million dollar mergers, on-site tailors, gourmet meals every night... and the thrill of stealing priceless works of art just to see if you can get away with it.

If you can relate to this heady premise, you'll love The Thomas Crown Affair. A loose remake of the 1968 Thomas Crown Affair, this version pits Pierce Brosnan and Rene Russo against each other in a game of cat-and-cat. Brosnan is Thomas Crown, an uber-wealthy NYC tycoon with an art fetish. Russo is Catherine Banning, a semi-rogue insurance investigator who instantly pegs Crown as the thief when the local Monet goes missing.

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Anatomy Of A Murder Review


Excellent
This very adult and daring (for 1959) courtroom thriller gives us a truly tricky case: James Stewart defends a man (Ben Gazzara) who murdered the guy who raped his wife (Lee Remick). He's pleading insanity. She has a history of not wearing panties. For close to three hours, Stewart makes his case in meticulous legal detail, with George C. Scott on the other side of the courtroom. All the principals are fantastic, with the possible exception of Remick, who just doesn't fit the part nearly well enough. Duke Ellington's score is a classic.

The Killing of a Chinese Bookie Review


Good
One of John Cassavetes' grittiest films, The Killing of a Chinese Bookie, if nothing else, gives us Ben Gazzara in a virtuoso performance. His haughty strip club owner is full of sadness and great lines, and though his story is circuitous and overlong (particularly the 1976 original; the 1978 version is about half an hour shorter), it's got moxie. The dilemma at hand: Should the broke Gazzara kill a rival Chinese bookie in order to wipe out his own $23,000 gambling bet? Heavy stuff, but it takes its sweet sweet time in getting to the point.

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Happiness Review


Essential
Holy smokes.

Happiness has been mired in controversy for the entire year, and not without good reason. Put simply, Happiness is one of the most shocking films I've ever seen - this from a man who adores A Clockwork Orange.

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Buffalo '66 Review


Good
Curious, but highly experimental film by actor/writer/director/composer Gallo in his writing/directing/composing debut. The story of a guy who returns home (from prison) to Buffalo is touching and bizarre, with equal emphasis on both.

The Spanish Prisoner Review


Extraordinary
"What I learned while watching The Spanish Prisoner," by Christopher Null.

1. Don't trust nobody.

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