Beirut European Festival 2012 Dates Announced

Beirut European Festival 2012 Dates Announced

Beirut tour Europe in May/ June. Full list of these European festival dates are:

31-May, Barcelona, Primavera

02-Jun, London, Field Day

04-Jun, Dublin, Forbidden Fruit

23-Jun, Munich, Southside

24-Jun, Schessel, Hurricane

26-Jun, Arendal, Hove Festival

27-Jun, Aarhus, Train

29-Jun, Werchter, Rock Werchter

30-Jun, Dusseldorf, Open Source Festival

Beirut leader Zach Condon's music is often synonymous with the exotic mysteries of world travel. Since Beirut's last album, 2007's The Flying Club Cup, sang a love letter to France (with a 2009 stop-off in Mexico for the March of the Zapotec EP) many have asked where his songs would voyage next. Lots of guesses, but few predicted the inward journey Condon has achieved on The Rip Tide, an album with the most introspective and memorable songs of his young career.

Recorded in Upstate New York, Brooklyn and, of course, Condon's hometowns of Albuquerque and Santa Fe, The Rip Tide marks a distinct leaping off point for Beirut. Musically, songs have a harmonic immediacy that contrasts the complexities of Zapotec's Mexican full orchestra compositions. These songs started as small melodies, conceived on piano or ukulele, then built upon by the entire band's contributions in the studio, before undergoing a paring down and retrofitting by Condon. What results is a record that sounds like it could have been recorded in one session, with exciting rhythms matching the upbeat horns and contrasting the mournful strings. In terms of style, no direct geographical affiliation to be exhumed. Rather, what emerges is a style that belongs uniquely and distinctly to Beirut, one that has actually been there all along.

Lyrically, Condon exposes a depth of honesty that outstrips the simplified nomadic troubadour image of his past. The songs speak of love, friendship, isolation and community, touching on universal human themes that are less fabricated stories than impressions of life at a quarter century of age. Songs are no longer about imagining places you haven't been; they're about places of which we are all extremely familiar, some of them too familiar.