Bebe Neuwirth

Bebe Neuwirth

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The 2015 Actors Fund Gala Arrivals

Bebe Neuwirth - A host of stars were snapped upon arrival to the 2015 Actors Fund Gala which was held at the Marriott Marquis Hotel in New York City, New York, United States - Tuesday 12th May 2015

Bebe Neuwirth and Catherine Zeta-Jones
Bebe Neuwirth and Catherine Zeta-Jones
Michael Bloomberg, Bebe Neuwirth, Morgan Freeman, Catherine Zeta-Jones and Michael Douglas

The New York Pops 32nd Birthday Dinner Arrivals

Bebe Neuwirth - The New York Pops 32nd Birthday Dinner held at the Mandarin Oriental Hotel - Arrivals. at Mandarin Oriental Hotel, - New York City, New York, United States - Tuesday 5th May 2015

Bebe Neuwirth

The New York Pops 32nd Birthday Gala Performance

Kelli O'Hara, Bebe Neuwirth, Alan Cumming, Victor Garber and Brian Stokes Mitchell - The New York Pops 32nd Birthday Gala at Carnegie Hall - Performance. at Carnegie Hall, - New York City, New York, United States - Monday 4th May 2015

Laura Benanti, Kelli O'Hara, Bebe Neuwirth, Alan Cumming, Victor Garber, Brian Stokes Mitchell and James Snyder
Rachel York, Laura Benanti, Kelli O'Hara, Bebe Neuwirth, Alan Cumming and Victor Garber
Bebe Neuwirth
Bebe Neuwirth
Bebe Neuwirth

Chicago Landmark Performance Curtain Call

James Naughton, Ann Reinking, Walter Bobbie and Bebe Neuwirth - Photographs from a curtain call as the musical 'Chicago' became the second longest running Broadway show in history at the Ambassador Theatre in New York City, New York, United States - Sunday 23rd November 2014

Christopher Fitzgerald, Bianca Marroquin, James Naughton, Ann Reinking, Walter Bobbie, Bebe Neuwirth, Joel Grey, Amra-Faye Wright and Raymond Bokhour
Christopher Fitzgerald, Bianca Marroquin, James Naughton, Ann Reinking, Bebe Neuwirth, Joel Grey, Amra-Faye Wright and Raymond Bokhour
James Naughton, Ann Reinking, Bebe Neuwirth and Joel Grey
James Naughton, Ann Reinking, Bebe Neuwirth and Joel Grey
James Naughton, Ann Reinking, Bebe Neuwirth and Joel Grey

Broadway Barks 16 - Arrivals

Bebe Neuwirth - Broadway Barks 16, a star-studded animal adoption event held in Shubert Alley - Arrivals. - New York, New York, United States - Saturday 12th July 2014

Bebe Neuwirth
Bebe Neuwirth

Getting to Know You Review


Good
When I first heard of this film, I immediately got the title reference. Like Joyce Carol Oates, I have lived in Princeton, and remember vaguely that ad series (I believe it was for Bell Atlantic, but am not sure) that featured the song with the thoroughly annoying refrain "Getting to Know You / Getting to Know All About You." For the remainder of the film, this tidbit of a song was stuck in my head. The fact that the film opens with music that seems a slight variant to the song does not help. The presence of such a score in my head for an hour and a half on end is enough to drive just about anyone to insanity.

Perhaps it is the annoying idiosyncratic insanity of that television Ad series that compelled Joyce Carol Oates to write the collection "Heat." Perhaps the filmmakers also heard the ads and, although not compelled to switch their local phone company, were compelled to make a film that would bring this particular psychological thumbscrew to the minds of anyone who lived on the Eastern Seaboard while the ads were running.

Continue reading: Getting to Know You Review

The Associate Review


Grim
There's a few legendary scripts among screenwriting circles -- scripts that people would love to rip off, if they could figure out how: Witness, Chinatown, Network. And then there's Tootsie, the queen mother of comedy scripts, that gets ripped off all the time.

The Associate is boilerplate Tootsie, lifting the entire plot structure from Dorothy's television world and dropping it on Wall Street, where Whoopi Goldberg finds herself forced to impersonate a man (named Cutty after Cutty Sark scotch) in order to be taken seriously.

Continue reading: The Associate Review

Le Divorce Review


OK
Two American blondes discover the joys of Paris - love, heartache, and wearing scarves in a multitude of ways. The blondes are the Walker sisters of California, Roxy (Naomi Watts) and Isabel (Kate Hudson). As Le Divorce opens, Isabel has just arrived in Paris to stay with Roxy and help her out in the late stages of her pregnancy. As luck would have it, Isabel shows up just as Roxy's husband, Charles-Henri (Melvil Poupaud) is walking out on her and their young daughter. The highly moralistic Roxy refuses to give Charles-Henri a divorce, instigating a battle with his extensive, wealthy family, which is lorded over with queenly arrogance by his mother, Suzanne de Persand (Leslie Caron).

The conflict between the Walker and de Persand clans is meant to be only the backdrop for the film's marquee star, Kate Hudson, to strut her naïve self around Paris and fall in lust with Charles-Henri's uncle, the much-older Edgar (Thierry Lhermitte), a suave TV commentator. But it is this familial battleground that quickly becomes the more engaging storyline, especially after Roxy and Isabel's parents (Sam Waterston and Stockard Channing) fly in from California to help out in the negotiations. Waterston and Channing play their roles with effortless grace, establishing that they've been comfortably married for years by using only the slightest of gestures.

Continue reading: Le Divorce Review

Getting to Know You Review


Good
When I first heard of this film, I immediately got the title reference. Like Joyce Carol Oates, I have lived in Princeton, and remember vaguely that ad series (I believe it was for Bell Atlantic, but am not sure) that featured the song with the thoroughly annoying refrain "Getting to Know You / Getting to Know All About You." For the remainder of the film, this tidbit of a song was stuck in my head. The fact that the film opens with music that seems a slight variant to the song does not help. The presence of such a score in my head for an hour and a half on end is enough to drive just about anyone to insanity.

Perhaps it is the annoying idiosyncratic insanity of that television Ad series that compelled Joyce Carol Oates to write the collection "Heat." Perhaps the filmmakers also heard the ads and, although not compelled to switch their local phone company, were compelled to make a film that would bring this particular psychological thumbscrew to the minds of anyone who lived on the Eastern Seaboard while the ads were running.

Continue reading: Getting to Know You Review

Celebrity Review


Excellent
Another fall, another movie from the Woodman.

Shot in black and white and filled with about 30 big-name stars, Celebrity is a welcome return to old-school Allen, his first really good film since 1994's Bullets Over Broadway.

Continue reading: Celebrity Review

Liberty Heights Review


OK
Liberty Heights is a coming of age story, a comedic drama about two brothers growing up Jewish in Baltimore in the mid-1950's. Against the tumultuous backdrop of McCarthyism and racial integration, Van (Adrien Brody) and Ben (Ben Foster) Kurzman, together with their parents, Nate (Joe Mantegna) and Ada (Bebe Neuwirth) face the daily trials of social, religious and racial discrimination.

Those familiar with Barry Levinson's other works, such as Diner and Tin Men, may find Liberty Heights disappointing. This picture strives to project a social consciousness but falls tragically short of the mark set in 1990 by Levinson's Academy Award-nominated Avalon. The powerful subject matter Liberty Heights attempts to address is never fully pursued, quickly falling away behind a glut of gimmicky coming-of-age scenes lacking both in sincerity and originality. At times the characters are so stereotypical, they border on offensive.

Continue reading: Liberty Heights Review

The Adventures of Tom Thumb & Thumbelina Review


OK
I have no idea if there are prior Tom Thumb or Thumbelina movies before this one (actually, I'm sure there are -- I just don't know if they're actually related to it), but this new Adventure certainly features an all-new, all-star cast.

Jennifer Love Hewitt (who's making a cottage industry out of voicing animated heroines) and Elijah Wood (who's making a cottage industry out of playing smaller-than-normal characters) take center stage as the titular leads, ultra-short teens in search of destiny (and quite naturally, one another, though they don't know it yet).

Continue reading: The Adventures of Tom Thumb & Thumbelina Review

Tadpole Review


Excellent
When you're young, it seems all you want is to be older - whether it's finally to be allowed to stay up late, to go out to a bar, or just to be taken seriously. In Oscar's case, it's just to be desirable.

All of Oscar Grubman's (Aaron Stanford) prep school friends - including best friend Charlie (Robert Iler of Sopranos fame) - tell him that he's a 40-year-old trapped in a 15-year-old's body. Instead of feeding on pop culture and pop music, Oscar spends his time quoting Voltaire and listening to opera. Think of him as a Max Fisher minus the bullshit. He strives to be cultured and sophisticated well beyond his years, and girls his age just don't cut the gouda.

Continue reading: Tadpole Review

Jumanji Review


Weak
If nothing else, Jumanji is the most unfortunately titled film of the year. And if you haven't turned on your television in the last month you may still be among the few who don't know what it means. For the uninitiated, Jumanji is an ancient board game set in the spooky jungle. When the game is played, it causes supernatural things to happen, including the creation of a horde of monkeys, earthquakes, a monsoon (indoors), and a stampede through the suburbs of the New England town in which Jumanji is set.

The story begins some 26 years earlier, when young Alan (Robin Williams) and Sarah (Bonnie Hunt) unearth the game and start playing. On Alan's first move, he finds himself sucked into the game as a prisoner, only to be released when the game is continued in 1995 by Judy (Kirsten Dunst) and Peter (Bradley Michael Pierce). Unfortunately, the ill effects of the game disappear only when it is finished, so the three track down Sarah, who, after years of therapy, has finally come to grips with the shock of seeing Alan vanish, and they continue where they left off.

Continue reading: Jumanji Review

How to Lose a Guy in 10 Days Review


Terrible
Here's a little something to think about, should you find your unfortunate, misguided, sorry ass dragged to see this utter waste of a movie. Who's more masculine-looking: Matthew McConaughey, with his Goldilocks looks and enormous pecs, or Kate Hudson, with her creepy, angular features and ironed-straight Guns N' Roses hairdo?

This spurious conjecture is sadly far more interesting than How to Lose a Guy in 10 Days, a film which effectively loses its audience inside of 10 minutes.

Continue reading: How to Lose a Guy in 10 Days Review

Bebe Neuwirth

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