Bebe Neuwirth

Bebe Neuwirth

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Bebe Neuwirth - The Actors Fund 2016 Gala - Red Carpet Arrivals - New York, New York, United States - Monday 25th April 2016

Bebe Neuwirth
Bebe Neuwirth
Bebe Neuwirth

Bebe Neuwirth - 15th Annual USTA Opening Night Gala at Billy Jean King National Tennis Center - New York, United States - Monday 31st August 2015

Bebe Neuwirth
Bebe Neuwirth

Bebe Neuwirth - A host of stars were snapped upon arrival to the 2015 Actors Fund Gala which was held at the Marriott Marquis Hotel in New York City, New York, United States - Tuesday 12th May 2015

Bebe Neuwirth
Michael Bloomberg, Bebe Neuwirth, Morgan Freeman, Catherine Zeta-jones and Michael Douglas
Bebe Neuwirth and Catherine Zeta-jones
Bebe Neuwirth and Catherine Zeta-jones

Bebe Neuwirth - The New York Pops 32nd Birthday Dinner held at the Mandarin Oriental Hotel - Arrivals. at Mandarin Oriental Hotel, - New York City, New York, United States - Tuesday 5th May 2015

Bebe Neuwirth
Bebe Neuwirth

Kelli O'Hara, Bebe Neuwirth, Alan Cumming, Victor Garber and Brian Stokes Mitchell - The New York Pops 32nd Birthday Gala at Carnegie Hall - Performance. at Carnegie Hall, - New York City, New York, United States - Monday 4th May 2015

Kelli O'hara, Bebe Neuwirth, Alan Cumming, Victor Garber and Brian Stokes Mitchell
Bebe Neuwirth
Bebe Neuwirth
Bebe Neuwirth
Bebe Neuwirth
Bebe Neuwirth

Getting To Know You Review


Very Good
When I first heard of this film, I immediately got the title reference. Like Joyce Carol Oates, I have lived in Princeton, and remember vaguely that ad series (I believe it was for Bell Atlantic, but am not sure) that featured the song with the thoroughly annoying refrain "Getting to Know You / Getting to Know All About You." For the remainder of the film, this tidbit of a song was stuck in my head. The fact that the film opens with music that seems a slight variant to the song does not help. The presence of such a score in my head for an hour and a half on end is enough to drive just about anyone to insanity.

Perhaps it is the annoying idiosyncratic insanity of that television Ad series that compelled Joyce Carol Oates to write the collection "Heat." Perhaps the filmmakers also heard the ads and, although not compelled to switch their local phone company, were compelled to make a film that would bring this particular psychological thumbscrew to the minds of anyone who lived on the Eastern Seaboard while the ads were running.

Continue reading: Getting To Know You Review

The Associate Review


Weak
There's a few legendary scripts among screenwriting circles -- scripts that people would love to rip off, if they could figure out how: Witness, Chinatown, Network. And then there's Tootsie, the queen mother of comedy scripts, that gets ripped off all the time.

The Associate is boilerplate Tootsie, lifting the entire plot structure from Dorothy's television world and dropping it on Wall Street, where Whoopi Goldberg finds herself forced to impersonate a man (named Cutty after Cutty Sark scotch) in order to be taken seriously.

Continue reading: The Associate Review

Le Divorce Review


Good
Two American blondes discover the joys of Paris - love, heartache, and wearing scarves in a multitude of ways. The blondes are the Walker sisters of California, Roxy (Naomi Watts) and Isabel (Kate Hudson). As Le Divorce opens, Isabel has just arrived in Paris to stay with Roxy and help her out in the late stages of her pregnancy. As luck would have it, Isabel shows up just as Roxy's husband, Charles-Henri (Melvil Poupaud) is walking out on her and their young daughter. The highly moralistic Roxy refuses to give Charles-Henri a divorce, instigating a battle with his extensive, wealthy family, which is lorded over with queenly arrogance by his mother, Suzanne de Persand (Leslie Caron).

The conflict between the Walker and de Persand clans is meant to be only the backdrop for the film's marquee star, Kate Hudson, to strut her naïve self around Paris and fall in lust with Charles-Henri's uncle, the much-older Edgar (Thierry Lhermitte), a suave TV commentator. But it is this familial battleground that quickly becomes the more engaging storyline, especially after Roxy and Isabel's parents (Sam Waterston and Stockard Channing) fly in from California to help out in the negotiations. Waterston and Channing play their roles with effortless grace, establishing that they've been comfortably married for years by using only the slightest of gestures.

Continue reading: Le Divorce Review

Getting To Know You Review


Very Good
When I first heard of this film, I immediately got the title reference. Like Joyce Carol Oates, I have lived in Princeton, and remember vaguely that ad series (I believe it was for Bell Atlantic, but am not sure) that featured the song with the thoroughly annoying refrain "Getting to Know You / Getting to Know All About You." For the remainder of the film, this tidbit of a song was stuck in my head. The fact that the film opens with music that seems a slight variant to the song does not help. The presence of such a score in my head for an hour and a half on end is enough to drive just about anyone to insanity.

Perhaps it is the annoying idiosyncratic insanity of that television Ad series that compelled Joyce Carol Oates to write the collection "Heat." Perhaps the filmmakers also heard the ads and, although not compelled to switch their local phone company, were compelled to make a film that would bring this particular psychological thumbscrew to the minds of anyone who lived on the Eastern Seaboard while the ads were running.

Continue reading: Getting To Know You Review

Tadpole Review


Excellent
When you're young, it seems all you want is to be older - whether it's finally to be allowed to stay up late, to go out to a bar, or just to be taken seriously. In Oscar's case, it's just to be desirable.

All of Oscar Grubman's (Aaron Stanford) prep school friends - including best friend Charlie (Robert Iler of Sopranos fame) - tell him that he's a 40-year-old trapped in a 15-year-old's body. Instead of feeding on pop culture and pop music, Oscar spends his time quoting Voltaire and listening to opera. Think of him as a Max Fisher minus the bullshit. He strives to be cultured and sophisticated well beyond his years, and girls his age just don't cut the gouda.

Continue reading: Tadpole Review

Jumanji Review


OK
If nothing else, Jumanji is the most unfortunately titled film of the year. And if you haven't turned on your television in the last month you may still be among the few who don't know what it means. For the uninitiated, Jumanji is an ancient board game set in the spooky jungle. When the game is played, it causes supernatural things to happen, including the creation of a horde of monkeys, earthquakes, a monsoon (indoors), and a stampede through the suburbs of the New England town in which Jumanji is set.

The story begins some 26 years earlier, when young Alan (Robin Williams) and Sarah (Bonnie Hunt) unearth the game and start playing. On Alan's first move, he finds himself sucked into the game as a prisoner, only to be released when the game is continued in 1995 by Judy (Kirsten Dunst) and Peter (Bradley Michael Pierce). Unfortunately, the ill effects of the game disappear only when it is finished, so the three track down Sarah, who, after years of therapy, has finally come to grips with the shock of seeing Alan vanish, and they continue where they left off.

Continue reading: Jumanji Review

The Big Bounce (2004) Review


Terrible
Near the end of The Big Bounce, Owen Wilson's character tells the woman who has just conned him, "I have to be sober to tell this story." In my opinion, only a drunk would be able explain (or BS) his way through this mess of a movie, a remake of an equally bad film of the same name from 1969. Both films are based on the novel from acclaimed author Elmore Leonard, and though Leonard may be able to pen a worth-reading novel, it's plain to see that transposing his words into a worth-viewing film is often an impossible task.

In this Bounce, Wilson plays vagabond Jack Ryan, a man who's bad luck and bad choices have landed him on the North Shore of Oahu where he takes a job in construction working for shady hotel developer Ray Ritchie (Gary Sinise) and his assistant Bob Jr. (Charlie Sheen). It's not long before Jack gets fired and finds new employment as a handyman at a complex of vacation bungalows owned by Judge Walter Crewes (Morgan Freeman). While working for Crewes, Jack becomes enamored with Nancy Hayes (Sara Foster, the poor man's Bridget Fonda), Ritchie's sexpot girlfriend and house-sitter while he escorts his wife (Bebe Neuwirth) on shopping trips in Honolulu. Nancy has a plan to milk Ritchie out of $200,000, and she needs Jack's help to pull it off.

Continue reading: The Big Bounce (2004) Review

Summer Of Sam Review


Terrible

The sixth line of my notes from the "Summer of Sam" preview screeningreads, "if Spike Lee wants us to sit here for 137 minutes, he'd betterpick up the pace."

An hour later, without a hint of an upswing in the movie'stempo, noticed I was near the back of the theater where there was a littlebit of light, so I pulled out the press kit and started reading it, justto have something to do.

Continue reading: Summer Of Sam Review

Liberty Heights Review


OK

A comical and retrospective memoir of segregation and discrimination in America's golden age of denial, "Liberty Heights" is director Barry Levinson's fourth movie built around his memories of Baltimore in the 1950s and '60s.

Told from the perspective of Ben Kurtzman (Ben Foster), the younger of two brothers living in an almost exclusively Jewish enclave of the city, the foundation for Levinson's story is the brothers' experimentation with the era's cultural polarization.

Ben's school has just been desegregated and he befriends a pretty new black student named Sylvia (Rebekah Johnson), something that doesn't sit well with either kid's folks.

Continue reading: Liberty Heights Review

Tadpole Review


Good

Home from boarding school for Thanksgiving holiday with unruly hormones and a festering Oedipal jones for his 40-something stepmom, idiosyncratic 15-year-old Manhattan sophisticate Oscar Grubman is having a hard time coping with life.

Versed in the classics, a voracious reader of Voltaire, fluent in French and tortured by his own high expectations, he doesn't have much use for girls his own age -- even the ones that like him. But as he waits impatiently for some elusive perfect moment to reveal his desires to Dad's wife (Sigounrey Weaver), Oscar gets a little drunk one night and goes to bed with her lusty best friend (Bebe Neuwirth) instead.

Such is the framework for "Tadpole," the enticingly tart, oddball coming-of-age comedy that won helmer Gary Winick the Director's Award at this year's Sundance Film Festival.

Continue reading: Tadpole Review

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Bebe Neuwirth Movies

Fame Trailer

Fame Trailer

Watch the trailer for Fame.The classic TV programme and film Fame is set for a...

Le Divorce Movie Review

Le Divorce Movie Review

Two American blondes discover the joys of Paris - love, heartache, and wearing scarves in...

Celebrity Movie Review

Celebrity Movie Review

Another fall, another movie from the Woodman.Shot in black and white and filled with about...

Liberty Heights Movie Review

Liberty Heights Movie Review

Liberty Heights is a coming of age story, a comedic drama about two brothers growing...

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Tadpole Movie Review

Tadpole Movie Review

When you're young, it seems all you want is to be older - whether it's...

How to Lose a Guy in 10 Days Movie Review

How to Lose a Guy in 10 Days Movie Review

Here's a little something to think about, should you find your unfortunate, misguided, sorry ass...

The Big Bounce (2004) Movie Review

The Big Bounce (2004) Movie Review

Near the end of The Big Bounce, Owen Wilson's character tells the woman who has...

Summer Of Sam Movie Review

Summer Of Sam Movie Review

The sixth line of my notes from the "Summer of Sam" preview screeningreads, "if Spike...

Le Divorce Movie Review

Le Divorce Movie Review

The further away director James Ivory and producer Ishmael Merchant get from their trademarked aristocratic...

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