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Monster Trucks Trailer


Tripp doesn't like the small town life that's currently encapsulating his life. He's a senior in high school and can't wait to make a break for a fresh start as soon as possible. Tripp is a great mechanic and starts building his own monster truck but what happens next was beyond belief for the student.

As Tripp works on his car, he discovers a monster living inside his car. Initially scared of the oddity, the human eventually warms to his unlikely new friend and realises that he must've come to the surface after a recent oil drilling accident. 

Tripp calls the monster Creatch and notes that he's incredibly intelligent and loves dining on large quantities of fuel. With hunters hot on the heels of Creatch, Tripp must devise a way to protect his new friend.

Continue: Monster Trucks Trailer

Broken City Review


Good

While this thriller plays with themes of political ethics and ambition, it merely lets them simmer in the background. Director Hughes is clearly much more interested in macho posturing and the convoluted scandal-based plot, so he lets the cast members merrily chomp on the scenery but neglects to give us anything that engages our brains.

The broken city of the title is New York, where Mayor Hostetler (Crowe) covered up a shooting involving cop Billy (Walhberg) to protect himself seven years ago. Acquitted but disgraced, Billy is now working as a low-rent private detective when the mayor calls in a favour. He hires Billy to find out who his wife (Zeta-Jones) is having an affair with before it derails his re-election campaign against the passionate rising-star Valliant (Pepper). It doesn't take Billy long to get the incriminating photos, but clearly there's something much bigger at stake here, so he continues to investigate the situation, which uncovers such high-reaching corruption that Billy's life is in danger.

Demonstrating how little the film cares about its characters, Billy's long-time girlfriend (Martinez) is dispatched suddenly after a series of arguments during which she refuses to put up with his boorish, chauvinistic stupidity. Why she stuck with him this long is the real question. But this and other eccentric relationships in the plot are much more interesting than the dull property-development boondoggle that Hughes instead decided to focus on. The problem is that this leaves Wahlberg with the only remotely complex character, an intriguing mess of a man who overreacts wildly to everything and yet seems to want to do the right thing.

Continue reading: Broken City Review

The Lone Ranger Trailer


John Reid is the Lone Ranger; a law-abiding man of justice from Texas who resolutely wears his mask and disguise at all times and vows to fight crime and keep the peace in his town. Battling alongside him is his trusted Native American companion Tonto, a painted spirit warrior and the complete opposite of Reid but, nonetheless, they make the perfect crime-fighting duo as they set out to conquer the theft and corruption that threaten the harmony of the people.

'The Lone Ranger' is the Walt Disney Pictures adaption of the legendary Western tales that started out on the radio in the 1930s before hitting TV screens in the 50s. It's a stunning modern take on the stories combining serious action with hilarity, with wonderful character development and the heart-warming partnership of Tonto and his 'kemosabe'. It was only right that Oscar winning big budget director Gore Verbinski returned to Walt Disney to work on the movie, having previously worked on Disney's popular film series 'Pirates of the Caribbean'. The screenwriters included those who wrote the modern story of another masked hero on 'The Mask of Zorro' Ted Elliott and Terry Rossio, along with Justin Haythe ('The Clearing', 'Revolutionary Road'). The movie will hit cinemas in the UK on August 9th 2013.

Starring: Johnny Depp, Armie Hammer, William Fichtner, Ruth Wilson, James Badge Dale, Tom Wilkinson, Barry Pepper, Helena Bonham Carter, Mason Cook, James Frain, Harry Treadaway, Matt O'Leary, W. Earl Brown, Leon Rippy, Timothy V. Murphy, Joaquin Cosio, Damon Herriman and Robert Baker

Lone Ranger: Armie Hammer Sparks Trailer Alert!


Armie Hammer Johnny Depp Helena Bonham Carter Tom Wilkinson Barry Pepper Ruth Wilson

Armie Hammer brought the Lone Ranger teaser trailer with him last night, as he made time in his busy schedule for an appearance on The Tonight Show, reports E! Online.

Looking dapper, sitting alongside Jay Leno in a bespoke grey suit, Hammer, who plays the titular peacekeeper alongside Johnny Depp, spoke of his time on set for the film: "I showed up on set and I said 'ok great we are gonna do the things with the scorpions right' and Gore [the director] was like 'I think we have to rework that.," he laughed, adding: "We were rehearsing with the dummy and the horse bit the dummy's nose off." More importantly, though, a teaser trailer for the new film accompanied his presence, and it didn't disappoint. We saw Western gunslingers, chugging steam trains and of course, the mercurial Depp looking suitably quirky in his Tonto attire. We've also been treated to a moody poster for the film recently, which sees the lone ranger's eyes in a rough depiction of the iconic black eye mask.

Continue reading: Lone Ranger: Armie Hammer Sparks Trailer Alert!

True Grit Review


Excellent
The Coen brothers return to the Charles Portis novel (rather than remaking the 1969 John Wayne movie) for this lean and riveting Western. It's a thoroughly involving story, with feisty characters and a wicked sense of humour.

Mattie Ross (Steinfeld) may be only 14 but she's determined to avenge the murder of her father by the outlaw Chaney (Brolin), who has fled into Indian territory. She tenaciously convinces gruff US Marshal Rooster Cogburn (Bridges) to take the case, rejecting the help of Texas Ranger LaBoeuf (Damon), who's been hunting Chaney for months. She also refuses to sit back and wait, riding out with Cogburn to chase Chaney down. Sure, this is no undertaking for a young girl, but Mattie may have more true grit than everyone else combined.

Continue reading: True Grit Review

True Grit Trailer


True Grit is a 1968 Western book by author Charles Portis, Ethan & Joel Coen now lend the story and re-work it into a film adaptation. They are not the first directors to turn this book into a film as it was also attempted by Henry Hathaway in 1969 and starred John Wayne.

Continue: True Grit Trailer

Unknown Review


Very Good
The way it plays out is elegantly simple: Five men find themselves in a warehouse unsure of who they are or how they got there. One of the men is tied to a chair. One is handcuffed to a railing and has been shot in the shoulder. One has a broken nose. The remaining two are bruised and bloodied. The warehouse is secured with bulletproof glass and bars. It's in a desert somewhere. There is no hope of escape.

As the men talk memories filter back slowly: The man in the jean jacket (Jim Caviezel, Passion of the Christ) recalls a violent kidnapping, the man with the broken nose (Greg Kinnear) recalls running, the man in the rancher shirt (Barry Pepper) is sure he can only trust one of them. They cannot decide if they should free the bound man (Joe Pantoliano) or help the handcuffed man (Jeremy Sisto) who is barely conscious. These desperate men slowly come to the realization that they are all involved in a kidnapping that went horribly awry. The question is: Who are the kidnappers and who are the kidnapped?

Continue reading: Unknown Review

The Green Mile Review


Excellent
The Green Mile? Let's talk about 26 miles. The length of a marathon. Start the race and the movie together: The race would long be over before the film. The winner would be at home, taking a nap. Yes, The Green Mile is three hours long.

Not that long movies have never been successful, and not that The Green Mile is bad. You might even think a long movie is required here. Pulled from Stephen King's acclaimed series of six books by the same name, King returns to the kind of work he was doing in The Shawshank Redemption (based on a short story of his), the kind that seems to perform the best, away from splatter and gore, and into the minds of the strangest of characters.

Continue reading: The Green Mile Review

The Three Burials Of Melquiades Estrada Review


Extraordinary
Tommy Lee Jones made his big-screen acting debut in the 1970 classic Love Story, yet it took him over 20 years and impressive performances in movies like JFK and The Fugitive to become a household name. Acclaim for Jones as a director should come much faster, if his debut film, The Three Burials of Melquiades Estrada, is a sign of things to come. Burials is a complex and remarkably assured film, taking the audience on a literal and metaphoric journey through the sand-blasted wastelands of south Texas to a point of redemption and agony, of forgiveness and searing regret.

Written by Guillermo Arriaga (Amores Perros, 21 Grams), the story is broken into several parts, each introduced by a chapter heading, jumping forward and backward in time. The action begins with two hunters coming upon the disinterred body of an illegal Mexican immigrant, Melquiades Estrada, who has been shot to death and hastily buried in a makeshift grave, only to have a coyote dig him up. The redneck sheriff (Dwight Yoakam) doesn't care enough about a dead Mexican to investigate his death, even though Melquiades' friend and employer, Pete Perkins (Jones), gives him evidence implicating a border patrolman.

Continue reading: The Three Burials Of Melquiades Estrada Review

Unknown Review


Very Good
The way it plays out is elegantly simple: Five men find themselves in a warehouse unsure of who they are or how they got there. One of the men is tied to a chair. One is handcuffed to a railing and has been shot in the shoulder. One has a broken nose. The remaining two are bruised and bloodied. The warehouse is secured with bulletproof glass and bars. It's in a desert somewhere. There is no hope of escape.

As the men talk memories filter back slowly: The man in the jean jacket (Jim Caviezel, Passion of the Christ) recalls a violent kidnapping, the man with the broken nose (Greg Kinnear) recalls running, the man in the rancher shirt (Barry Pepper) is sure he can only trust one of them. They cannot decide if they should free the bound man (Joe Pantoliano) or help the handcuffed man (Jeremy Sisto) who is barely conscious. These desperate men slowly come to the realization that they are all involved in a kidnapping that went horribly awry. The question is: Who are the kidnappers and who are the kidnapped?

Continue reading: Unknown Review

Flags Of Our Fathers Review


Very Good
At some point during the process of adapting James Bradley's nonfiction book about the battle of Iwo Jima, Clint Eastwood decided he'd need two movies to adequately manage the material's scope. The first, Flags of Our Fathers, focuses solely on the American campaign. It uses Joe Rosenthal's celebrated photograph of the raising of the flag as a springboard for a successful war bonds fund-raiser, and debates with timely flair the use of political spin to salvage an unpopular war.

Eastwood's follow-up, Letters from Iwo Jima, arrives in theaters early next year and will recount the battle from Japan's perspective. The director hired first-time screenwriter Iris Yamashita to develop Letters from an idea that screenwriter Paul Haggis proposed. He will employ an all-Asian cast, and will not use any of the actors we meet in Flags. It is yet to be determined whether the two movies will offer legitimate parallels, or exist as separate entities.

Continue reading: Flags Of Our Fathers Review

The Three Burials Of Melquiades Estrada Review


Extraordinary
Tommy Lee Jones made his big-screen acting debut in the 1970 classic Love Story, yet it took him over 20 years and impressive performances in movies like JFK and The Fugitive to become a household name. Acclaim for Jones as a director should come much faster, if his debut film, The Three Burials of Melquiades Estrada, is a sign of things to come. Burials is a complex and remarkably assured film, taking the audience on a literal and metaphoric journey through the sand-blasted wastelands of south Texas to a point of redemption and agony, of forgiveness and searing regret.

Written by Guillermo Arriaga (Amores Perros, 21 Grams), the story is broken into several parts, each introduced by a chapter heading, jumping forward and backward in time. The action begins with two hunters coming upon the disinterred body of an illegal Mexican immigrant, Melquiades Estrada, who has been shot to death and hastily buried in a makeshift grave, only to have a coyote dig him up. The redneck sheriff (Dwight Yoakam) doesn't care enough about a dead Mexican to investigate his death, even though Melquiades' friend and employer, Pete Perkins (Jones), gives him evidence implicating a border patrolman.

Continue reading: The Three Burials Of Melquiades Estrada Review

The Green Mile Review


Excellent
The Green Mile? Let's talk about 26 miles. The length of a marathon. Start the race and the movie together: The race would long be over before the film. The winner would be at home, taking a nap. Yes, The Green Mile is three hours long.

Not that long movies have never been successful, and not that The Green Mile is bad. You might even think a long movie is required here. Pulled from Stephen King's acclaimed series of six books by the same name, King returns to the kind of work he was doing in The Shawshank Redemption (based on a short story of his), the kind that seems to perform the best, away from splatter and gore, and into the minds of the strangest of characters.

Continue reading: The Green Mile Review

Firestorm Review


Weak
Well, it coulda been a LOT worse.

The Snow Walker Review


Very Good
A little The Edge, a little Dances with Wolves, this adventure oddity is surprisingly watchable while featuring two stars who never learn to fully communicate.

Barry Pepper is a bush pilot named Charlie Halliday who takes ill Inuit woman Kanaalaq (Annabella Piugattuk) on a routine flight, only to have it go down in the remote wilderness of the tundra. (Lucky for them it's summertime.) The survive the crash, but Kanaalaq is too sick to walk for help, so Charlie heads out on his own. He gets lost (and attacked by bees), but Kanaalaq has secretly tracked him, and she nurses him back to health. Eventually they try to trek back to the plane (which no one has found, weeks later), and from there they finally opt to try to trek back to civilization after Kanaalaq has taught Charlie extensive survival skills.

Continue reading: The Snow Walker Review

Knockaround Guys Review


Weak
Warning to Vin Diesel fans: Regardless of what the marketing surrounding the crime drama Knockaround Guys may tell you, Diesel, Hollywood's new action hero, is not the star of this film. He, of the deep voice and bulging biceps, is a featured player but has only moderate screen time -- he's even billed after Barry Pepper (*61, Saving Private Ryan). If you're hoping or expecting to see something like XXX, well... then see XXX again.

What you'll get with Knockaround Guys is another knock-off of a gangster film, 90 minutes of phony tough guy bravado, stagy dialogue, laughably inaccurate accents and, most inexcusably, a slow-moving story. This may all explain why Diesel isn't the lead in this chest-thumper: The film was made before his breakout success and has reportedly been sitting on the shelf at New Line. It must now be time to take advantage of his star -- and box office -- power.

Continue reading: Knockaround Guys Review

Battlefield Earth Review


Terrible
There are two things the American film industry should avoid at all costs. One is letting an ambitious actor convert one of his or her favorite novels into a feature film. Two is never greenlight a sci-fi film starring John Travolta. To wit, we present the disaster that is Battlefield Earth.

A science-fiction opus starring the Barbarino of the Actors Guild, Battlefield Earth should be shown only at maximum-security prisons when a prisoner is tossed in solitary for bad behavior. Sci-fi is always a tricky beast: Tight script, a good director, an ensemble cast of decent actors, and the ability to suspend even the most difficult of disbeliefs. Battlefield Earth fails at achieving even one of these attributes.

Continue reading: Battlefield Earth Review

25th Hour Review


Good

For almost its entire first act, Spike Lee's captivating, character-driven "25th Hour" only hints at a plot as the film corkscrews into the pulp of one dismal, discomforting day in the once-high life of Monty Brogan.

A handsome, well-to-do, young Manhattanite with a swanky apartment, a beautiful, love-of-his-life girlfriend, a loyal dog he rescued from near-death and a detached disposition, Monty (Edward Norton) seems nonetheless morbidly acquiescent to and distracted by something ponderous hanging over him.

As Monty tries to shore up plans to spend the evening with two life-long friends -- an arrogant Wall Street cowboy (Barry Pepper) and an anxious, clammy, unstrung schoolteacher (Philip Seymour Hoffman) -- director Lee reveals in brief, striking flashback fragments what it is that's on the character's mind.

Continue reading: 25th Hour Review

We Were Soldiers Review


Good

Mel Gibson plays yet another idealized and idealistic father-of-five war hero, bursting at the seams with charge-leading integrity in "We Were Soldiers," a detailed and staggering account of the first harrowing battle of the Vietnam War.

This may sound like a bit much to take so soon after he single-handedly vanquished the British as a choleric colonial in "The Patriot." But Gibson is well cast in this far heavier and historically accurate picture that only falls back on hackneyed Hollywoodisms when it takes a break from the battlefield (and that isn't very often).

Gibson stars as Lt. Col. Hal Moore, the man who reluctantly but boldly lead the first American ground troops into the Ia Drang Valley on November 14, 1965 -- 11 years after the occupying French were trounced in the same location (as established in the film's brutal World War I-styled prologue).

Continue reading: We Were Soldiers Review

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Barry Pepper Movies

Maze Runner: The Death Cure Trailer

Maze Runner: The Death Cure Trailer

Thomas (Dylan O'Brien) and his fellow Gladers have fought their way out of a Griever-infested...

Bitter Harvest Trailer

Bitter Harvest Trailer

Yuri is an artist living in Ukrainian Cossack family in the early 1930s. All seems...

Monster Trucks Movie Review

Monster Trucks Movie Review

Word has it that a 4-year-old came up with the idea for this unapologetically silly...

Monster Trucks Trailer

Monster Trucks Trailer

Tripp doesn't like the small town life that's currently encapsulating his life. He's a senior...

The Scorch Trials Movie Review

The Scorch Trials Movie Review

After the rather lacklustre teen-dystopia adventure The Maze Runner, the action continues in this equally...

Maze Runner: The Scorch Trials Trailer

Maze Runner: The Scorch Trials Trailer

Having overcome a series of deadly encounters in the box-office smash The Maze Runner, this...

Maze Runner: The Scorch Trials - Teaser Trailer

Maze Runner: The Scorch Trials - Teaser Trailer

Following their supposed escape from the monster infested maze, the surviving Gladers led by Thomas...

Kill The Messenger Trailer

Kill The Messenger Trailer

Kill the Messenger follows the real life story of Journalist Gary Webb (Jeremy Renner), as...

The Lone Ranger Movie Review

The Lone Ranger Movie Review

Everything about this film screams excess, from the ludicrous two-and-a-half hour running time to the...

Snitch Movie Review

Snitch Movie Review

Dwayne Johnson tries to flex his acting muscles in this smarter-than-usual action movie, based on...

The Lone Ranger Trailer

The Lone Ranger Trailer

John Reid is a Texas ranger; law-abiding and glad to ride alongside his brother, following...

Broken City Movie Review

Broken City Movie Review

While this thriller plays with themes of political ethics and ambition, it merely lets them...

The Lone Ranger Trailer

The Lone Ranger Trailer

John Reid bears the alias of the Lone Ranger and uses his title and his...

Snitch Trailer

Snitch Trailer

When a young man named Jason accidentally and unwittingly gets caught up in drug dealing...

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