Barry Levinson

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Filming on location set of NBC's new TV series 'Shades of Blue'

Jennifer Lopez and Barry Levinson - Filming on location set of NBC's new TV series 'Shades of Blue' at Brooklyn - New York City, United States - Monday 15th June 2015

Jennifer Lopez and Ray Liotta
Jennifer Lopez and Ray Liotta
Jennifer Lopez and Ray Liotta
Jennifer Lopez
Jennifer Lopez

TIFF - 'The Humbling' - Premiere

Al Pacino (l) and director Barry Levinson - Toronto International Film Festival - 'The Humbling' - Premiere - Toronto, Canada - Thursday 4th September 2014

Al Pacino
Al Pacino
Al Pacino and Lucila Sola
Al Pacino and Lucila Sola

71st Venice International Film Festival

Al Pacino and Barry Levinson - 71st Venice International Film Festival - 'The Humbling' - Premiere - Venice, United Kingdom - Saturday 30th August 2014

Al Pacino
Al Pacino
Al Pacino and Camila Sola
Al Pacino
Al Pacino

71st Venice International Film Festival

Al Pacino and Barry Levinson - 71st Venice International Film Festival - 'The Humbling' - Photocall - Venice, Italy - Saturday 30th August 2014

Al Pacino
Al Pacino
Al Pacino
Al Pacino
Al Pacino and Barry Levinson

Retire? No Way: Shia LaBeouf Is Rocking The Kasbah With Bill Murray and Bruce Willis


Shia LaBeouf Barry Levinson Bill Murray

Shia LaBeouf’s antics over the past year have been attributed to a wider ideal: a performance art piece produced with the help of several other artists. Whether that’s true or not, the mercurial actor claimed he was retiring ‘from public life’ – a claim that has just been confirmed as boohocky with the announcement of his role in Rock The Kasbah. (Casbah? Some say K, some say C)

Shia LaBeoufShia LaBeouf doing some sort of work - proper work

LaBeouf – who made his name as a child-star in Even Stevens, and enjoyed a successful turn in Holes - will star alongside Bill Murray in Barry Levinson's Rock the Kasbah. Bruce Willis, Kate Hudson, Danny McBride and Zooey Deschanel also share the screen. Brian Grazer and Tom Freston are stepping in to exec produce Kasbah, while QED International will be looking for buyers at Berlin's upcoming European Film Market.

Continue reading: Retire? No Way: Shia LaBeouf Is Rocking The Kasbah With Bill Murray and Bruce Willis

Johnny Depp To Star As Notorious Boston Gangster In 'Black Mass'


Johnny Depp Armie Hammer Barry Levinson

Johnny Depp will take on the role of the notorious Boston-based gangster Whitey Bulger in the upcoming film Black Mass, it was announced yesterday by the film's producers.

The project, which will be directed by Barry Levinson (who won an Oscar for directing Rain Man), will follow the life of one of America's most infamous organised crime barons and will be adapted from the book on Whitey's life, also called Black Mass, by Boston journalists Dick Lehr and Gerard O'Neill. Whitey rose through the ranks of Boston's criminal underworld before becoming an informant for the FBI in a bid to get rid of a gangster rival. He was eventually arrested in 2011.

The film is being produced by Cross Creek and will be distributed by Universal Studios, the statement (from Cross Creek) also said, with filming for the project getting under way in May this year. Prior to this, Depp will next be seen in the upcoming Disney reboot of the family western The Lone Ranger, in which he will play the Ranger's (played by Armie Hammer) Native American sidekick Tonto. The Lone Ranger will be released 3 July 2013 in the US and 9 August in the UK.

Continue reading: Johnny Depp To Star As Notorious Boston Gangster In 'Black Mass'

Picture - Barry Levinson , Sunday 14th October 2012

Barry Levinson Sunday 14th October 2012 Comic Con New York held at the Jacob Javits Convention Center

Inside Moves Review


Terrible
Director Richard Donner became a name by making big, action-packed blockbusters like Superman and the Lethal Weapon quartet. So watching Inside Moves, his 1980 character study about outcasts who find salvation in a watering hole, is mesmerizing for all the wrong reasons. It's like watching Michael Jordan missing a curveball by a country mile, Garth Brooks rocking out as Chris Gaines, or George W. Bush handling foreign policy.

The lead outcast here is Roary (John Savage), who attempts to end his life by jumping from a 10-story window. Through dumb luck he survives, but emerges months later from the hospital with a crippled leg and a broken spirit. Desperate for something to do, he heads over to the local bar, Max's, which looks like the kind of place that serves nothing but procrastination and broken dreams.

Continue reading: Inside Moves Review

...and Justice For All. Review


Good
Sorry to break it to you, but the line "The whole system's out of order!" does not appear in ...And Justice for All., Norman Jewison's send-up of the American legal system and one of the films with the most complicated punctuation ever to be released

The actual line that Al Pacino bellows out in the film's final scene, in case you're wondering, is this: "You're out of order! You're out of order! The whole trial is out of order! They're out of order!" Nah, doesn't quite roll off the tongue the same way, does it?

Continue reading: ...and Justice For All. Review

Bugsy Review


Excellent
After writing, directing and starring in one of the most politically intriguing films of the 1990s, Bulworth, Warren Beatty vanished. He only resurfaced in 2001 in the deplorable Town & Country, which had been finished since 1999. There was no loud announcement of quitting Hollywood, he just stopped acting and started complaining about the Governator.

A consummate leftist, Beatty was always into politics and into political filmmaking, or films that took on big topics at least. So, the question must be asked why he would decide to star as one of the most flamboyant, vain gangsters of all time, Benjamin "Bugsy" Siegel. Not only did he act in the film, he was the reason it started. Beatty wrangled up James Toback to write the thing and then snagged Barry Levinson to direct the picture, and decided that the focus of the film should be the end of Siegel's career/life.

Continue reading: Bugsy Review

High Anxiety Review


Good
One of the reasons we film critics have a soft spot for Mel Brooks's High Anxiety is that its endless parade of campy Hitchcock gags makes us feel smart. "Oh, that's from Vertigo. Hey, that's from North by Northwest. Did you hear that? He just said MacGuffin."

Of course, it's vitally important that you be in the mood to see a Mel Brooks movie when you see a Mel Brooks movie -- any Mel Brooks movie -- because if you're not, you'll just groan, roll your eyes, and walk away. But if you're feeling silly, Mel will make you laugh, and High Anxiety keeps the zingers coming from the very first moment, when the urgent strains of the powerful orchestra accompany Dr. Richard Thorndyke (Brooks) as he walks through the airport during the opening credits. The credits end, and Thorndyke comments, "What a dramatic airport!" Later, the Los Angeles Symphony Orchestra will follow him around in a bus to add more drama to pivotal scenes.

Continue reading: High Anxiety Review

Silent Movie Review


OK
Mel Brooks has never exactly been a master of subtlety. He's also never known when a joke is worthy of a five-minute bit and when it's something you can flesh out into a full length feature.

Silent Movie is exactly what it says in the title: An honest to God silent film. In fact, it's a silent film about the making of a silent film. Brooks plays, basically, himself, a movie producer who's trying to get funding for the first silent film in 40 years. The studio is on the verge of bankruptcy, and our hero attempts to save the studio by rustling up Hollywood's biggest stars to appear in the show. They play themselves and, indeed, represent some of Hollywood's biggest stars.

Continue reading: Silent Movie Review

Man of the Year Review


Terrible
Like a politician riding the campaign trail, Barry Levinson's Man of the Year talks out of both sides of its mouth by promising one thing but delivering another. Ad materials suggest an irreverent Robin Williams comedy that aims to satirize our electoral process. Once that plot is established, though, Year converts into a low-level political potboiler that's scraped from the sides of John Grisham's circular file.

What's funny about this deceptive bait-and-switch is that Year rests on the shoulders of a character whose primary directive is to slice through the empty rhetoric that's clogging our branches of government. Talk show host Tom Dobbs (Williams) takes Washington bureaucrats to task on a nightly basis - the character is modeled after Daily Show host Jon Stewart. At the urging of his fed-up fan base, Dobbs tosses his hat into the presidential race and hits the campaign trail with his manager (Christopher Walken) and producer (Lewis Black) in tow.

Continue reading: Man of the Year Review

Silent Movie Review


OK
Mel Brooks has never exactly been a master of subtlety. He's also never known when a joke is worthy of a five-minute bit and when it's something you can flesh out into a full length feature.

Silent Movie is exactly what it says in the title: An honest to God silent film. In fact, it's a silent film about the making of a silent film. Brooks plays, basically, himself, a movie producer who's trying to get funding for the first silent film in 40 years. The studio is on the verge of bankruptcy, and our hero attempts to save the studio by rustling up Hollywood's biggest stars to appear in the show. They play themselves and, indeed, represent some of Hollywood's biggest stars.

Continue reading: Silent Movie Review

Barry Levinson

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