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ShoWest 2010 - Warner Brothers Pictures' 'Big Picture 2010'

Barry Josephson, Josh Duhamel and Warner Brothers - Barry Josephson, Josh Duhamel and Greg Berlanti Las Vegas, Nevada - ShoWest 2010 - Warner Brothers Pictures' 'Big Picture 2010' Thursday 18th March 2010

Aliens In The Attic Review


Good
High energy levels and some genuinely hilarious set pieces make this kids' alien-invasion romp a lot more fun than expected. It's not, erm, rocket science, but it's a thoroughly entertaining ride from start to finish.Tom (Jenkins) is a surly teen who's a lot smarter than his grades indicate. But his parents (Nealon and Vigman) plan to whip him into shape with a family fishing holiday with sisters Bethany and Hannah (Tisdale and Boettcher) plus cousins (Butler, Young and Young), a goofy uncle (Richter), sassy Nana (Roberts) and Bethany's smarmy too-old boyfriend (Hoffman). At the isolated lake house, the kids discover that they're under siege from pint-sized aliens.

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Enchanted Review


Good
In a fairly surprising move, Disney has come forward and shown it has an actual sense of humor about its patented brand of cheesy, clich├ęd, and relentless peppiness. Previously, self-reference has been limited to cross marketing between one Disney film and the next; but in Enchanted the message seems to be: Yeah, we know we've got our share of hokey archetypes, but it works for us. It's a refreshing attitude.

Giselle lives in the conflation of every single Disney trope ever, in an animated, magical fairy-tale kingdom full of songs of her one true love. The evil queen (who is also a wicked stepmother) can't have some upstart marry the prince and move in on her territory, so she banishes Giselle from animation to reality: New York, to be precise.

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Big Trouble Review


Unbearable
Much has been said about Big Trouble, another film meant for a near-September 11th release that was postponed because its contents would be too upsetting amidst the tragedy. Now, seven months and countless airport security measures later, Touchtone Pictures has determined that it is a better time for the film's release.

But forget about September 11th for a moment and consider this: Is there ever a good time to release a film that endorses bribing airline personal for tickets to carry a suitcase containing a ticking nuclear bomb onto a plane? The answer is easy. Pre- or post-September 11th, there is no appropriate time for a comedy this poorly conceived. Big Trouble is irresponsible filmmaking; it doesn't even justify the space for an explanation. But since reviews are my business, let me try to sort out this movie's mess.

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The Ladykillers (2004) Review


Weak
Joel and Ethan Coen's hot hands finally have cooled with their remake of The Ladykillers, and fans could probably see it coming. For starters, as mentioned, it's a remake - uncharted waters for two filmmakers best known for placing their unique fingerprints all over their unusual projects. Their vision ends up being a productive failure that's silly rather than sophisticated. We're engaged by its oddities, but never really entertained.

The original Ladykillers pitted Alec Guinness, Peter Sellers, and their band of British crooks against a kindly old landlady in 1955. The Coens shift their action from England to the Deep South, where Tom Hanks wheezes and grins as a genteel criminal mastermind plotting to rob a Mississippi riverboat casino. He and his motley crew take up residence in the home of Marva Munson (Irma P. Hall), a churchgoing Bible Belter with a room to rent near the boat's dock. The men fool Munson into thinking they perform in a musical group, though they're forced to consider devious actions when the old lady discovers their criminal plans.

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Hide and Seek Review


Terrible
Forget what the Chinese New Year Calendar says -- so far, it's the year of the horror movie. Not even one month into 2005, and we're already being bombarded with a steady stream of empty and inadequate thrillers. White Noise disguised its mediocrity with fancy scientific jargon for looking at television static. The latest, Hide and Seek, turns a simple children's game into a boneless, psychological pretense for stale chills.

After the apparent suicide of Alison Callaway (Amy Irving), husband David (Robert De Niro) and daughter Emily (Dakota Fanning) pick up the pieces of their broken lives and escape to the serenity (we know otherwise) of upstate New York. David, a psychologist, feels the move to the countryside will help them recover. Emily is especially devastated, but the pair relocates despite the strong objections of her doctor Katherine (Famke Janssen). They move into a vast, empty mansion with secret rooms and hideouts -- three times the space they really need. The house is clearly used as a plot device more than a place of rejuvenation.

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The Crew Review


Good
Whenever studio executives try to combine the successful formula of two blockbuster films, the end result is always a mess of a script, acting, directing, and generally a waste of time for any audience with an average IQ above 40. The latest movie morass from Hollywood, The Crew, appeared equally destined to fail, a strange combination of Grumpy Old Men and GoodFellas tossed together with the likes of Richard Dreyfuss and Burt Reynolds helming the ship. The scary thing is that it's actually entertaining and a breath of fresh air in this otherwise stale month.

The Crew works for several reasons. The clever script is reminiscent of an old Billy Wilder movie, following four "past their prime" wiseguys from Jersey who now live in the Raj Mahal Apartment House in Miami Beach. The wiseguys find themselves being evicted from their "golden paradise" by greedy landlords bent on raising rents for new beach bunnies and boys looking for beachfront property. The four mobsters, Bobby Bartellemeo (Richard Dreyfuss), Joey "Bats" Pistella (Burt Reynolds), Mike "The Brick" Donatelli (Dan Hedaya), and Tony "Mouth" Donato (Seymour Cassel) decide to hatch a scheme to plant there a dead body heisted from the morgue in order to drive out the new tenants and keep their home. This "simple plan" suddenly goes screwy, of course, and the boys become involved with a stripper named Ferris (Jennifer Tilly) who wants her stepmother killed, a paranoid Latin drug lord who's convinced a mysterious rival is out to get him, and a rat with its tail on fire.

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