Barry Humphries

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Celebrities leave Barry Humphries' Farewell Tour 'Eat Pray Laugh!' press night

Debbie McGee - Celebrities leave Barry Humphries' Farewell Tour 'Eat Pray Laugh!' press night at The London Palladium - London, United Kingdom - Friday 15th November 2013

Barry Humphries and Kathy Lette
Barry Humphries and Kathy Lette
Barry Humphries and Katy Manning

Dame Edna Everage attends a photocall in London

Dame Edna Everage and Barry Humphries - Dame Edna Everage attends a photocall for the Barry Humphries farewell tour 'Eat, Pray, Laugh!' - London, United Kingdom - Wednesday 13th November 2013

Dame Edna Everage and Barry Humphries
Dame Edna Everage and Barry Humphries
Dame Edna Everage and Barry Humphries
Dame Edna Everage and Barry Humphries
Dame Edna Everage and Barry Humphries

Justin and the Knights of Valour Trailer


Justin is an average boy with big dreams living in a Kingdom where the Queen has enlisted lawyers instead of knights. However, Justin wants more than anything in the world to become one the latter, just like his deceased grandfather Sir Roland. He must embark on a quest to train to become the best knight he can and on the way meets his three mentors, Blucher, Legantir and Braulio, a wacky wizard named Melquiades and the very beautiful Talia. Sooner than he'd hoped, he finds his first challenge; Sir Heraclio and his sidekick Sota are attempting to raise an army to defeat the Kingdom, leaving Heraclio crowned king. Justin must protect the Kingdom he was brought up in and, in doing so, purloin his grandfather's old sword from Heraclio's clutches.

Continue: Justin and the Knights of Valour Trailer

Dame Edna Everage, real name Barry Humphries, arrives at The London Palladium

Dame Edna Everage and Barry Humphries - Dame Edna Everage, real name Barry Humphries, arrives at The London Palladium ahead of his farewell tour show tonight in 'Eat, Pray, Laugh!' - London, United Kingdom - Monday 15th July 2013

Dame Edna Everage and Barry Humphries
Dame Edna Everage and Barry Humphries
Dame Edna Everage and Barry Humphries
Dame Edna Everage and Barry Humphries
Dame Edna Everage and Barry Humphries

Nicky Haslam Book Launch Party at Oka

Barry Humphries aka Dame Edna Everage and wife Lizzie Spender - Nicky Haslam Book Launch Party at Oka at 157 Fulham Rd - London, United Kingdom - Thursday 21st March 2013

Barry Humphries and Dame Edna Everage
Barry Humphries, wife Lizzie Spender and Dame Edna Everage
Barry Humphries and Dame Edna Everage
Barry Humphries, wife Lizzie Spender and Dame Edna Everage

performing at the Negresco hotel

Dame Edna Everage and Barry Humphries - Dame Edna Everage aka Barry Humphries Saturday 6th October 2012 performing at the Negresco hotel

Dame Edna Everage and Barry Humphries
Dame Edna Everage and Barry Humphries

The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey Trailer


Bilbo Baggins is a hobbit, who lives a quiet life in The Shire. His peace is interrupted one day when Gandalf arrives on his doorstep, persuading Bilbo to hold a party in his home. Bilbo refuses but has no choice but to agree when Gandalf pesters him.

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Mary and Max Review


Essential
For his first feature, filmmaker Elliot (who won an Oscar for his remarkable short Harvie Krumpet) uses claymation to tell a dark, grown-up story about an extraordinary friendship over 20 years.

Mary (voiced by Whitmore then Collette) is a friendless 8-year-old in Melbourne whose father spends his life quietly stuffing birds while her luridly colourful mother Vera (Geyer) remains attached to a sherry bottle. Desperate for a friend, she writes to a random New Yorker: Max (Hoffman) is a painfully lonely 44-year-old with Asbergers, and her letter completely unsettles his carefully ordered life. But he eventually responds, and over the decades each of them opens up to their pen-pal in extremely unusual ways.

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Mary and Max Trailer


Watch the trailer for Mary and Max

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Nicholas Nickleby Review


OK
Poor Charles Dickens. He has the good fortune to be remembered by the entire world. What high school student hasn't been forced to suffer through Great Expectations? Nowadays, one of his books (and he didn't really write that many) is turned into a movie or a mini-series every year. (2001 saw four Dickens recreations on film or TV.)

2002 will earn but a single Dickens adaptation, a motion picture of Nicholas Nickleby, perhaps Dickens' least-read work and one of his most wandering (the novel being more than 800 pages long).

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Welcome to Woop Woop Review


OK
Somewhere between A Boy and his Dog, Blue Velvet, and The Sound of Music, lies Welcome to Woop Woop, a truly oddball tale (as all Aussie movies tend to be) about an American con artist hiding out down under. Upon meeting a wild Aussie girl, he is promptly kidnapped to the very remote village of Woop Woop, whose sole industry is turning kangaroos into dog food called Woof Woof. It's no Queen of the Desert, but lets call it a middling princess.

Nicholas Nickleby Review


Grim

You deserve a grain-of-salt warning before reading this review: Your friendly film critic really can't abide Charles Dickens, and "Nicholas Nickleby" is especially exemplary of everything that irks me about his work.

The characters in this tale of 19th Century woe are largely one-dimensional -- implausibly sweet and naive or absurdly ruthless and cruel without reason -- and they invite second-guessing to a distracting degree.

Nineteen years old and suddenly the head of his family after his father's death, the title character (played by the over-earnest Charlie Hunnam) reluctantly moves with his mother and sister from the quiet country cottage they can no longer afford to dirty, polluted, noisy, heartless London, seeking the help of Nicholas's rich, odious uncle (Christopher Plummer), who doesn't see why he should be burdened with helping his brother's family.

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Finding Nemo Review


OK
Offering further proof that the folks at Pixar are ceaselessly, unflaggingly more clever and imaginative than anyone else working in big-budget feature animation, the underwater CGI-animated "Finding Nemo" opens today -- and it's smarter, funnier and more entertaining than any other all-ages film so far this year.While Disney's in-house animators have been assembly-lining prosaic sequels ("The Jungle Book 2," "Return to Never Land") and re-imagined misfires ("Treasure Planet") -- and very occasionally coloring a little bit outside the lines ("Lilo and Stitch") -- the computer-'toon platoon at Pixar's Emeryville, California studios is supplying the Mouse House with delightfully creative products like "Monster's Inc." and this new adventure, in which an apprehensive, over-protective clown-fish father traverses the sea in search of his missing son.

The youngster was scooped up near his reef home by some monstrous, two-legged land creature in scuba gear and deposited into a Australian dentist's fish tank, populated by a colorful crew of fellow captives who help little Nemo (voice of Alexander Gould) hatch an escape plan. In the meantime, Marlin -- his fretful father with the perfectly anxiety-ridden intonations of Albert Brooks -- ventures deeper into the deep blue than he has ever dared before, determined to find the boy.

Helped along the way, if "helped" is the word for it, by a dingbat blue tang with short-term memory problems (and the oh-so-apropos voice of Ellen DeGeneres), Marlin finds his courage in dangerous adventures (mines and shipwrecks) and discovers friends in the forms of a surfer-dude sea turtle (voiced by Andrew Stanton, the movie's director), an astute pelican (Geoffrey Rush) who becomes his transportation into the dentist's office, and a trio of 12-stepping sharks who are trying to go vegetarian (including future "Hulk" Eric Bana and Barry Humphries, aka "Dame Edna").

Resourceful in its storytelling (the East Australian Current which Marlin must travel is akin to an underwater freeway crossed with a roller coaster) and reliably, steadily hilarious ("Hey, you're a clown fish," observe all the dopier sea critters who meet mopey Marlin. "Tell us a joke!"), "Finding Nemo" is also astounding to look at. Like a fantastical scuba dive, the picture's always-in-motion undersea universe would be downright photo-realistic if Stanton and his animators hadn't dialed up the cartoonishness just enough to give all the fish googly ping-pong-ball eyes.

Continue reading: Finding Nemo Review

Barry Humphries

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