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Bai Ling - Bai Ling out and about in Beverly Hills showing her midriff in gold trousers and floral top at beverly hills - Los Angeles, California, United States - Thursday 17th September 2015

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Tara Reid and Bai Ling - Slim Tara Reid and Bai Ling dine at Craig's in West Hollywood - Los Angeles, California, United States - Thursday 19th March 2015

Tara Reid and Bai Ling
Tara Reid
Tara Reid
Tara Reid
Tara Reid and Bai Ling
Tara Reid and Bai Ling

Bai Ling - The Soiree: Grammy Weekend Party at The Grafton, Grammy - Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 7th February 2015

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Bai Ling - Bai Ling posing for photoshoot at Marina del Rey - Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 18th January 2015

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Bai Ling - Shots of a variety of stars as they attended Sue Wong New Years Eve party which was held at The Cedars in Los Angeles, California, United States - Wednesday 31st December 2014

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Bai Ling - Comikaze Geeks Only Party hosted by The Winner Twins held at Dave & Busters - Arrivals - Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 1st November 2014

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Kristanna Loken and Bai Ling - The Burbank International Film Festival 2014 - Closing Night - Inside - Burbank, California, United States - Sunday 7th September 2014

Kristanna Loken and Bai Ling
Zoë Bell, June Squibb and Kristanna Loken
Kristanna Loken
Kristanna Loken
Kristanna Loken and Zoë Bell
Kristanna Loken

Bai Ling Los Angeles, CA, United States Bai Ling surfing on the beach in Marina Del Rey Wednesday 9th January 2013

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Bai Ling Saturday 7th July 2012 London Film & Comic Con held at Olympia Grand Hall.

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Atmosphere and Bai Ling
Atmosphere and Bai Ling
Atmosphere and Bai Ling
Atmosphere and Bai Ling
Atmosphere and Bai Ling

Bai Ling Friday 8th May 2009 leaves My House nightclub Los Angeles, California

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Anna And The King Review


Good
Anna and the King of Rock and Roll...

My theory is that every generation needs their own version of the film The King and I. Namely a new king. My grandparents had Rex Harrison, my parents had Yul Brynner, and now my generation has Chow Yun-Fat. Hold the phone right there, mister. Chow Yun-Fat... isn't he that the guy from those crazy, violent, Hong Kong action movies by John Woo? Fear not, kind reader, for Chow Yun-Fat commands the role made famous for all these years and gives both Harrison and Brynner a run for their money.

Continue reading: Anna And The King Review

The Beautiful Country Review


Good
It's getting harder to appreciate an immigrant saga like The Beautiful Country in which audiences are expected to be swayed by the poor and huddled masses. After all, isn't the United States a country of immigrants? To make such a film memorable, directors should try one of two things: Remind us of the importance of this notion through a distinctive personal narrative, or tell us something we haven't heard before. The Beautiful Country flirts with both possibilities, but not enough to produce something memorable.

In 1990 Vietnam, Binh (newcomer Damien Nguyen) has an even more difficult time because of his genetics. He's the product of a mixed marriage, a hasty but loving union of a Vietnamese mother and G.I. father, neither of whom he has seen in years. After he's forced out of his master/guardian's house, Binh, armed with little more than an old photograph and a bicycle, treks to Saigon where he reunites with his mother. A tragic accident forces another long, winding trek to America to find his father.

Continue reading: The Beautiful Country Review

Face (2002) Review


OK
The concept of "losing face" is the titular reference made by Bertha Bay-Sa Pan's Face, the story of three generations of Chinese-American women living in Queens (during both the 1970s and 1990s) whose lives are forever altered by an adherence to outmoded beliefs. Earnest and intermittently poignant despite its obvious construction, Bay-Sa Pan's drama is yet another in a long line of cinematic stories about immigrant families struggling to simultaneously assimilate and retain their ethnic heritage. And while it brings little freshness to the burgeoning sub-genre, this minor film - mildly affecting even considering its uneven performances and some grating use of music - nonetheless conveys the intractability of long-held attitudes and the frequent impossibility of cross-generational reconciliation.

The life of demure, respectful teenager Kim (Bai Ling) is forever altered when, after being raped by acquaintance Daniel (Will Yun Lee), she discovers she's pregnant and is forced by her mother Mrs. Lieu (Kieu Chinh) - who blames Kim for the situation, and who's eager to minimize her own dishonor - to marry her spiteful attacker. Desperate to escape this miserable betrothed life, Kim eventually snaps, leaving the baby girl in her mother's care before fleeing for Hong Kong. Nineteen years later, Kim returns to Queens to attend her resentful daughter Genie's (Kristy Wu) high school graduation, only to find tradition-rejecting history repeating itself. Ignoring her grandmother's disapproving stance toward anything modern or American, Genie surreptitiously wears belly shirts that display her forbidden naval piercing, hangs out with non-Chinese friends, and has begun dating Michael (Anthony "Treach" Criss, frontman for Naughty by Nature), an African-American DJ whose skin color makes him, in the eyes of Genie's elderly guardian, an unacceptable boyfriend.

Continue reading: Face (2002) Review

Three... Extremes Review


Very Good
As anthologies invariably tend to be disappointingly lopsided ventures, it's a welcome surprise to find that unevenness is the strongest facet of Three... Extremes, a diverse and successfully chilling horror triptych that brings together the short works of acclaimed directors Fruit Chan (Durian Durian), Park Chanwook (Oldboy), and Takashi Miike (Audition). Unrelated save for a shared fascination with female ghoulishness, the three segments form something of a rough primer for Asian horror newbies, with Chan delivering a dose of macabre black wit, Chanwook providing his usual brand of self-consciously bloody moralizing, and Miike contributing otherworldly, irrational J-horror spookiness. And though none come close to approximating the bone-deep scares elicited by Kiyoshi Kurosawa's 2001 Pulse (which receives a long-overdue stateside release in early November), the trio of stories - alternately caustic, gruesome, and bafflingly opaque - prove a welcome relief from the CG-infatuated, subtext-barren supernatural thrillers currently being dumped on moviegoers by Hollywood this Halloween season.

Progressing from its strongest to its weakest chapters, Three... Extremes (a sequel to 2002's Three) starts with the Hong Kong-native Chan's sumptuous Dumplings, a satiric tale of female vanity-gone-awry that began as a feature-length film (also titled Dumplings) but was cut down by the director to a compact 40-odd minutes for this cinematic compilation. Having not seen it in its original form, I'm unqualified to discuss the pluses and minuses of this editing-room abbreviation, yet Chan's entry is nonetheless an amusingly grisly piece of social commentary in which former TV star-turned-neglected trophy wife Mrs. Li (Miriam Yeung) finds the fountain of youth (and the remedy to her negative self-image) via witchy chef Aunt Mei's (Bai Ling) unique brand of dumplings. Revealing the special ingredient that makes Mei's culinary treats so physically and emotionally rejuvenating would be in bad taste, but suffice to say that Chan - riffing on Jonathan Swift's A Modest Proposal with the help of Wong Kar-Wai regular Christopher Doyle's disquietingly ethereal cinematography - deliciously lays bare modern society's unhealthy preoccupation with physical female beauty via one crunchy bite and a terrifying, serpentine lick of the lips.

Continue reading: Three... Extremes Review

Star Wars: Episode III - Revenge Of The Sith Review


Very Good
Here's your "Revenge of the Sith" review in a nutshell: It may well be the best of all six "StarWars" movies -- with the caveat that you need to have seen the other five films to truly grasp its significance.

The cunning dexterity and gravitas with which George Lucas snaps into place every remaining puzzle piece in his epic 30-year storyarc is remarkable. The talent of Hayden Christensen will surprise his detractors as he portrays a complex, compounding crisis of conflicting loyalties thattear Anakin Skywalker apart, leading him to slip ever more rapidly toward the Dark Side of the Force. The potent sensations of betrayal and inevitabilitythat fuel the climactic duel between the young Jedi knight and his former master Obi-Wan Kenobi are positively goosepimpling, even though every "StarWars" fan knows the outcome and has been waiting for this moment for years.

These elements, coupled with much improved dialogue, far fewer scenes transparently designed to foster inevitable tie-in video games,and genuinely compelling emotions make up for the myriad of shortcomings that plagued the previoustwo"Star Wars" prequels.

Opening in the midst the Clone Wars between the crumbling galactic republic and an alliance of separatists that is really a frontfor the evil Sith Lords (all those villains called "Darth This" and "Darth That"), "Star Wars: Episode III -- Revenge ofthe Sith" is surprisingly character-driven. The plot revolves around the volatile, brash young Anakin being appointed by the increasingly powerfulChancellor Palpatine (soon to be revealed as Darth Sidious) to be his personal representative on the Jedi Council, which has for centuries tried to maintainpeace in this galaxy far, far away.

Continue reading: Star Wars: Episode III - Revenge Of The Sith Review

Sky Captain & The World Of Tomorrow Review


Good

An imaginative spectacular of retro-futuristic adventure and mind-boggling special effects, "Sky Captain and the World of Tomorrow" so perfectly captures the silly sci-fi wonder of the 1930s serials which inspired it that watching this matinee marvel doesn't arouse a modern reaction of "wow!" or "cool!" -- it garners a genuine, awe-struck "golly!"

The film is cinematically breathtaking, with sepia-toned semi-color photography, swooping Orson-Wellesian dutch angles, top-secret floating air fortresses and pre-War propellered fighter planes battling giant robots in the skyscraper canyons of Depression-era Manhattan. But what's all the more amazing is that, except for the actors and a few props, nothing on the screen -- not the city sidewalks, not the interiors of cars the actors drive, not even the carpets in the lush, film-noir-shaded interior sets -- is real.

Beginning in college, first-time writer-director Kerry Conran spent 10 years on his Macintosh computer creating a six-minute sample of the opening sequence, in which a dirigible docks with the top of the Empire State building just as the riveted-steel six-story robots attack. When Hollywood producer Jon Avnet saw this clip, he raised $70 million and gave Conran free rein to hire himself a titular hero, played by a swashbuckling Jude Law, to come to the rescue and complete the director's groundbreaking dream -- a live-action movie set in an entirely CGI world.

Continue reading: Sky Captain & The World Of Tomorrow Review

SHE HATE ME Review


Bad

What could Spike Lee have been thinking?

Right on the heels of an unalloyed masterpiece, "25th Hour," the great American filmmaker delivers "She Hate Me," a bizarre, head-scratching hodgepodge of poorly executed bad ideas.

Many film buffs consider Lee a hit-and-miss director, but even his biggest failures ("Jungle Fever," "Summer of Sam," "Bamboozled") have had some kind of coherence, some alignment of angry, passionate ideas, painted with Lee's singular vision and voice.

Continue reading: SHE HATE ME Review

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Bai Ling

Date of birth

10th October, 1966

Occupation

Fashion Model

Sex

Female

Height

1.60






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Bai Ling Movies

Crank 2: High Voltage Trailer

Crank 2: High Voltage Trailer

Watch the trailer for Crank 2: High Voltage.Jason Statham picks up his role as Chev...

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Edmond Movie Review

Edmond Movie Review

There's a slight chance, very slight, that David Mamet is a genius. As a writer,...

Sky Captain and the World of Tomorrow Movie Review

Sky Captain and the World of Tomorrow Movie Review

Good science fiction is so hard to come by. Usually reserved for big Memorial Day...

Anna And The King Movie Review

Anna And The King Movie Review

Anna and the King of Rock and Roll...My theory is that every generation needs their...

The Beautiful Country Movie Review

The Beautiful Country Movie Review

It's getting harder to appreciate an immigrant saga like The Beautiful Country in which audiences...

Star Wars: Episode III - Revenge of the Sith Movie Review

Star Wars: Episode III - Revenge of the Sith Movie Review

Here's your "Revenge of the Sith" review in a nutshell: It may well be the...

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