Arnold Vosloo

Arnold Vosloo

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Odd Thomas Review


Excellent

After Van Helsing, the first G.I. Joe and the Mummy movies, filmmaker Stephen Sommers just about keeps his excessive action instincts in check for this offbeat supernatural comedy. There are still aspects of a thriller here, but the characters have a surprising depth that adds to the humour and drama, providing both strong laughs and moving emotional moments.

Yelchin plays the title character, who isn't sure if his given name is just missing a first T or whether it was prophetic. As Odd grows up, he discovers that he can see dead people who need help solving their murders. The police chief (Dafoe) in his small desert town believes him because he gets every case right. And now Odd's girlfriend Stormy (Timlin) helps him piece together clues when it becomes apparent that something hugely horrific is about to happen. Odd also turns to his psychic friend Viola (Mbatha-Raw) as he grows increasingly worried about the rising presence of deathly creatures that swarm around people who are about to die.

Sommers sets this up with a wry wink, letting Yelchin play Odd as a nerdy nice guy who can't quite believe he has such a hot girlfriend. We like him instantly, so are happy to go along with the fantastical story. And the witty dialogue keeps us chuckling with its snappy commentary and absurd sideroads. Yelchin gives Odd a terrific sense of physical energy, which helps him develop sharp chemistry with everyone else on-screen. With his visions of something momentous on the horizon, the film feels like a comical variation on Donnie Darko

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G.I. Joe: Retaliation Trailer


After the events of the first film, which saw them take on an organisation called COBRA and a notorious arms dealer, the G.I. Joe Team are back in a new adventure.

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Los Angeles Screening of 'G.I.JOE:The Rise of Cobra' held at the Grauman's Chinese Theater

Arnold Vosloo - Arnold Vosloo and Guest Hollywood, California - Los Angeles Screening of 'G.I.JOE:The Rise of Cobra' held at the Grauman's Chinese Theater Thursday 6th August 2009

G.I. Joe: The Rise of Cobra Review


Excellent
Frankly, this is what summer movies should be like. The filmmakers have harvested the coolest elements from blockbusters over the past five or six years and thrown them all into one wildly entertaining, thoroughly over-the-top action thriller.

US soldiers Duke and Ripcord (Tatum and Wayans) are guarding a terrifying new nano-weapon when they're attacked and then defended by two outrageously high-tech assault forces. They of course eventually join the good side, the G.I. Joes, an elite team led by General Hawk (Quaid). These top commandos (including Nichols, Taghmaoui, Akinnuoye-Agbaje and Park) are hunting Duke's ex Ana (Miller), who has gone over to the dark side to help supervillain arms dealer McCullen (Eccleston) and his Vader-esque evil-doctor sidekick with their nefarious plan for world domination.

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Los Angeles Screening of 'G.I.JOE:The Rise of Cobra' held at the Grauman's Chinese Theater

Arnold Vosloo Thursday 6th August 2009 Los Angeles Screening of 'G.I.JOE:The Rise of Cobra' held at the Grauman's Chinese Theater Hollywood, California

Blood Diamond Review


Excellent
Blood Diamond has too many politics to be an action movie, too little hanky panky to be a romantic drama, and too many chase scenes to be real social activism. It's action drama against the backdrop of political turmoil -- in this case, Sierra Leone in 1999 -- where it is tricky to come off as neither tritely do-gooder nor exploitative. In this case, the effort is surprisingly successful.

Djimon Hounsou plays Solomon Vendy, a fisherman who just wants a better life for his son. But when the rebels come, he is unwillingly thrust into the midst of the violence -- his family is scattered, he is captured, their village is decimated. He is working the diamond mines at gunpoint when he catches, and hides, an epic stone -- huge, flawless, and slightly pink.

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The Mummy Returns Review


Terrible
That darn mummy!

Stab him, burn him, unravel him (or whatever Brendan Fraser & Co. did to him in the original; I can't even remember)... he still keeps coming back!

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The Mummy Review


Unbearable
Normally, when a movie is really bad, the best part of watching the film is watching the previews. When watching The Mummy, Stephen Sommers "not-quite-a-remake-but-really-is" of the 1921 version, I didn't even get that satisfaction. I think one of the previews was good, but not good enough for me to remember its title. I remember that Jan de Bont is coming out with a new chic horror film called The Haunting or something equally cheesy, which looks to be worse than his last one. I also remember seeing a preview for a new Arnold Schwarzenegger movie that didn't even dare put his name on it after him having been in the double-trouble combination of Eraser and Jingle all the Way.

So, when the movie was as bad as the previews, I was not a happy camper.

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Agent Cody Banks Review


Terrible
I recently read an article that argued TV shows like CSI and James Bond movies are primarily responsible for young people's increased interest in criminal forensics and special military forces. Since Hollywood is both smart and shameless, it uses these notions to its advantage, devouring the success of Bond and vomiting up films like Spy Kids and Agent Cody Banks. Although the original Spy Kids worked, Agent Cody Banks proves that things seldom taste as good a second or third time.

Agent Cody Banks was made just to make money, and to stock Toys 'R' Us shelves and McDonald's Happy Meal boxes with cheap action figures. The script, which feels like the cheapest writers available threw it together in a week, is actually quite impressive in how every mind-numbing scene attempts to manipulate the minds of susceptible adolescents. It uses every trick in the book, from pre-teen humor and Bond rip-offs, to busty secret agents, phony special effects, and, of course, Frankie Muniz. If -- God forbid -- the movie is a hit, the producers have even secured an easy sequel with its carefully formulated ending.

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Hard Target Review


Terrible
Hard target my ass.

Of all of the dumb action flicks that I have seen, Hard Target is perhaps the easiest target of all to hit. It sits there, a bloated animal on the silver screen, waiting for some nasty critic to take pen to paper and kick it until it stops moving... and I suppose that job would fall upon yours truly.

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Con Express Review


OK
Those naughty Russkies are at it again in Con Express, which features the archetypal "rogue Russian agent" trying to retrieve a load of nerve gas for nefarious ends.

No sooner than Sean Patrick Flanery's U.S. customs agent has captured Russkie Arnold Vosloo (yes, The Mummy himself) than Vosloo has escaped, sending their plane crashing into the Canadian wilderness. Flanery must then team up with a non-rogue (and female, naturally) Russian agent (Ursula Karven), to find Vosloo and his henchmen before they retrieve the nerve gas from a train (presumably the titular Con Express) headed back to the U.S.

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The Mummy Review


Good

Every inch a traditional, joyously corny, pith helmetswashbuckler flick -- complete with damsel in distress -- Universal's post-modernremake of "The Mummy" is a masterful marriage of '30s adventure/horrorand self-cognizant, Millennium-era, thrill-a-minute action.

Packed with awesome CGI special effects and anchored byBrendan Fraser, an ideal dashing-but-scruffy, lantern-jawed hero, thereisn't much left of the 1932 Boris Karloff original here, but as good old-fashionedadventure goes, this "Mummy" is giddy, low-brow fun.

Fraser stars as an soldier of fortune in 1923, leadinga group of treasure hunters and archeologists to a mythological 3,000-year-oldEgyptian city he stumbled on to once before. During their dig, the groupinadvertently awakens an undead and unfriendly mummy -- an ancient priestwho was buried alive in a sarcophagus filled with flesh-eating scarab beetlesmillennia ago for diddling a Pharaoh's mistress, and now he wants her back.

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The Mummy Returns Review


Terrible

Remember how badly "Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom" turned out when Steven Spielberg tried to wedge an impish kid into his successful archeology-action-adventure formula? Well, deja vu.

How pathetically contrived and sadly unoriginal is the obviously rushed-into-production "The Mummy Returns"? Everything you need to know can be gleaned from these three facts: 1) Prim-but-sexy Egyptologist Evelyn (Rachel Weisz) turns out to be the reincarnation of Queen Nefertiti. 2) Lantern-jawed adventurer Rick O'Connell (Brendan Fraser) finds out that a tattoo he bears means he was born to be a Medjai warrior. And, 3) their ragamuffin 8-year-old son Alex (Freddie Boath) is "The Chosen One" -- although the movie makes little attempt to explain what that means.

All together now: Oh, brother!

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Agent Cody Banks Review


Weak

Yes, "Agent Cody Banks" is a "Spy Kids" clone. As such, I went into it expecting an uncreative, cash-in-on-a-trend children's movie -- the kind parents are loathe to suffer through, yet for some reason take their kids to see anyway.

But while its plot doesn't stand up to even a modest amount of logical scrutiny, the flick has a comical, junior-James Bond spirit that's hard to resist. Of course, there are a couple differences between James Bond and highly-trained CIA spook Cody Banks (played by "Malcolm In the Middle's" Frankie Muniz): 1) Cody is 15 and lives with his parents who don't know he's a spy, and 2) Cody is hopelessly inept at talking to girls.

His tendency to get tongue-tied around cute classmates becomes a major problem when his hubba-hubba CIA handler (Angie Harmon from "Law & Order") assigns him to get close to the adorable Natalie Conners (Hilary Duff, better known as the Disney Channel's "Lizzie McGuire"). It seems the girl's scientist father is unknowingly developing nanobot technology for a villain (the ominously tan Ian McShane) who wants the microscopic 'bots to eat away US missile guidance systems. It's part of his evil plan to render the country defenseless for no adequately explored reason.

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Arnold Vosloo

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