Armin Mueller-stahl

Armin Mueller-stahl

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60th Berlin International Film Festival (Berlinale) - Opening Night

Armin Mueller-Stahl Thursday 11th February 2010 60th Berlin International Film Festival (Berlinale) - Opening Night Berlin, Germany

The International Review


Excellent
Tom Tykwer's The International can trace its bloodline back to the paranoia peddlers of the 1970s --- think The Parallax View or Three Days of the Condor -- but benefits tremendously from our current predicaments. After all, can you think of a better time to open a globetrotting thriller that casts a morally bankrupt financial institution in the villainous role?

This isn't just any bank behaving badly, though. The fictitious International Bank of Business and Credit is a global (yet eerily faceless) entity with employees who are experts at covering the shadow organization's tracks. When necessary, the IBBC can make court records, police documents, and even people disappear. The IBBC established its wealth laundering money for terrorist groups and organized criminals. Now it's bidding to broker a major arms deal with China that would supply weapons to Middle Eastern military factions.

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Night on Earth Review


Good
Riding around five shaded cityscapes in four different countries, Jim Jarmusch's nocturnal delight Night on Earth has the esteem of being the auteur's most accessible exercise to date while also being his least seen. After its premiere at the 29th New York Film Festival, this set of through-the-windshield vignettes was picked up for a short theatrical run in May of 1992 before it was released on VHS and only released on DVD in foreign markets (Australia put out two separate editions). That was until those noblest practitioners of cinephilia over at Criterion took a special interest in Jarmusch, releasing both Earth and his 1984 opus Stranger Than Paradise, which also includes the director's fascinating debut feature Permanent Vacation.

Throughout the course of one night, we are driven around in five separate taxi cabs that range from familiar ports of L.A. and New York City to the echoing streets of Paris and Rome to the final ride through the frozen-over metropolis of Helsinki, right as the sun is rising. In Los Angeles, a big-time agent (Gena Rowlands) tries to seduce her rough-and-tumble cab driver (an insolent Winona Ryder) into becoming an actress. While in New York, a jerky Brooklynite (the superb Giancarlo Esposito) teaches his German cab driver (Armin Mueller-Stahl) how to drive, talk, and jive correctly while also trying to escort his sister-in-law (Rosie Perez) home.

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attend a press conference to announce that the new movie "The Internatioal" will begin filming this week at Studio Babelsberg

Clive Owen, Tom Tykwer and Armin Mueller-Stahl - Clive Owen, Tom Tykwer, Armin Mueller-Stahl, Potsdam, Germany - attend a press conference to announce that the new movie "The Internatioal" will begin filming this week at Studio Babelsberg Sunday 23rd September 2007

attend a press conference to announce that the new movie "The Internatioal" will begin filming this week at Studio Babelsberg

Clive Owen and Armin Mueller-Stahl - Clive Owen, Armin Mueller-Stahl, Potsdam, Germany - attend a press conference to announce that the new movie "The Internatioal" will begin filming this week at Studio Babelsberg Sunday 23rd September 2007

Clive Owen and Armin Mueller-Stahl

Eastern Promises Review


Excellent
We're in London and the streets look like they are owned and operated by Beelzebub himself. The ghosts of the KGB death squads loom in the distance, but the Russian crime syndicate's stranglehold over the hoods and alleys is as strong as ever. Out of one of these decrepit alleyways crawls a 14-year-old girl who walks into a pharmacy only moments before hemorrhaging from the baby girl inside her. Her death is announced at the same time as her daughter's birth. Welcome to the decaying London of David Cronenberg's Eastern Promises.

A master at the ancient art of phantom punching, Cronenberg's examination of the Russian mafia's sex trade, currently flourishing in London, doesn't hit you till you're a good quarter mile out of the theater, as you're still contemplating Viggo Mortensen's slicked-back hairdo. Like a cccwolf right before the hunt, Mortensen snarls and calmly stalks as Nikolai, the driver for a sect of the elusive crime syndicate Vory V Zakone, a specter that arose from the ashes of Stalin's work camps. Nikolai works for Semyon (Armin Mueller-Stahl) and Semyon's volatile son Kirill (Vincent Cassel), taking care of their transportation and their criminal refuse. When Nikolai snaps off the fingers of a corpse, he asks Kirill and his business associate Azim (Mina E. Mina) to leave... but the audience is allowed to stay.

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Photocall for the movie "Buddenbrooks - Ein Geschaeft von einiger Groesse" at Luebeck City Hall

Iris Berben and Armin Mueller-Stahl - Iris Berben and Armin Mueller-Stahl Luebeck, Germany - Photocall for the movie "Buddenbrooks - Ein Geschaeft von einiger Groesse" at Luebeck City Hall Monday 20th August 2007

Photocall for the movie "Buddenbrooks - Ein Geschaeft von einiger Groesse" at Luebeck City Hall

Iris Berben, August Diehl and Armin Mueller-Stahl - Iris Berben, Armin Mueller-Stahl and August Diehl Luebeck, Germany - Photocall for the movie "Buddenbrooks - Ein Geschaeft von einiger Groesse" at Luebeck City Hall Monday 20th August 2007

Iris Berben, August Diehl and Armin Mueller-Stahl

Shine Review


Excellent
In Hollywood, you just can't make a movie like Shine. Put simply, it is just not allowed.

This is our loss and Australia's gain, because Shine comes off as one of the upper-echelon films of the year, an ambitious and unflinching look at that country's David Helfgott, a prodigy of a pianist driven insane by his father, only to emerge again after 20 years of institutionalization.

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The Peacemaker Review


Good
High stakes intrigue when nine nuclear missiles go missing in post-breakup Russia. Kidman and Clooney are hammy, yes, but for all its flaws, The Peacemaker is a lot of fun. Favorite line, Kidman yelling, "Take the shot!"

The Thirteenth Floor Review


Grim
I want to start by mentioning that I actually work on the 13th floor of a real live building in downtown San Francisco. My business card actually reads "13th Floor". Reading my business card is more interesting than this film.

Interesting premise: Computer geniuses build a virtual reality machine that lets them go back in time to 1937 Los Angeles. Only the virtual people have feelings and emotions just like us; they don't know they're not real. But then they find out.

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Jakob the Liar Review


Grim
Goooooooooooooooooooooooooood Morning, Auschwitz!

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The Third Miracle Review


Good
In the immortal words of singer Fats Waller, "I believe in miracles...." Who else is a believer? Agnieszka Holland, best known for poetic period pieces like Washington Square and trite garbage like Total Eclipse, who finally ventures into the modern era (or reasonably modern: 1979) with The Third Miracle.

Based on the poorly-received novel of the same name, The Third Miracle follows a down-and-out drunk of a priest named Frank Shore (Harris), on his assignment to debunk (or bunk) a claim of sainthood regarding a Chicago woman named Helen. The main case for sainthood? A young girl who prayed to the woman has been cured of lupus. Now the statue where that girl prayed is crying Helen's Type-A human blood. People are flocking from around the nation.

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The Game Review


Excellent
Any more of that brooding atmosphere and I might have to strangle myself. I don't know how Michael Douglas does it, much less manage to keep himself alive and kicking through two hours of torment, all of which may or may not be a fantasy "game" his brother (Sean Penn) has enrolled him in. Douglas plays an uber-rich tycoon who has everything he could want and is bored to tears with all of it. When kid brother promises the game will fill in what's lacking in his life, Mikie finds himself drawn to it, and a labyrinthine all-too-realistic game of murder, deceit, and betrayal begins. Set in my newly adopted home of San Francisco, I find this city full enough of intrigue even without machine gun-toting assassins and attack dogs chasing me around back alleys. And I can't imagine what I'd do if a cabbie drove us into San Francisco Bay... but I suppose that's why you have to watch the movie.

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The Last Good Time Review


Grim
Er, I'm guessing the last good time is when old fogie Armin Mueller-Stahl gets to bonk hottie Olivia d'Abo. The rest of the movie (when d'Abo is wearing clothes, that is) is unmemorable -- some wandering tale about Armin's tax problems and Olivia's abusive boyfriend. Two ships passing in the night and all that. Written, produced, and directed by character actor Bob Balaban.
Armin Mueller-stahl

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