Armie Hammer

Armie Hammer

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Biography

Armie Hammer (born Armand Hammer 28.07.1986)
Armie Hammer is an American actor famous for his role as both Winklevoss twins in 2010's 'The Social Network' and his upcoming lead role in 2013's 'The Lone Ranger'.

Childhood: Armie Hammer was born in Los Angeles, California. He moved to Dallas, Texas before moving again to the Cayman Islands at the age of seven and then to LA again at the age of 12. His parents are Dru Ann who was a bank loan officer and Michael who owned the companies Knoedler Publishing and Armand Hammer Productions. He attended Faulkner's Academy, Grace Christian Academy which his father founded and Los Angeles Baptist High School. He dropped out in the eleventh grade to embark on an acting career but took courses at Pasadena City College and the University of California. He claims that his parents 'disowned' him when he left school.

Acting Career: Armie Hammer has appeared in several episodes of 'Gossip Girl' and 'Reaper' in 2009 as well as appearing in 'Desperate Housewives', 'Veronica Mars' and 'Arrested Development' where he made his screen debut. He made his break as the titular character in the movie 'Billy: The Early Years' in 2008. In 2010, he had a starring role in David Fincher's Facebook story 'The Social Network' where he played the Winklevoss twins and subsequently won two awards including a Toronto Film Critics Association Award for Best Supporting Actor. He was nominated for a Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Supporting Role for appearing as Clyde Tolson in 2011 movie 'J. Edgar'. In 2012, he appeared as Prince Andrew Alcott in fantasy movie 'Mirror Mirror' He will play the main part in 'The Lone Ranger' in 2013 alongside Johnny Depp who will star as his sidekick Tonto.

Personal life: Armie Hammer married Elizabeth Chambers in 2010 after being introduced by his friend Tyler Ramsey.



Biography by Contactmusic.com

Call Me By Your Name Trailer


It's the summer of 1983 and 24-year-old Oliver has returned from his studies in America to stay with his parents at their villa in Northern Italy. It's there he meets a 17-year-old local named Elio; a free spirit who enjoys reading, playing music, swimming and partying. Elio offers to show Oliver the sights of the town, and it doesn't take long for the pair to start falling for each other. But it's a confusing time for them - for Elio especially. He has a complicated relationship with his female friend Marzia, and both of them face rejection and prejudice on the basis of their bisexual feelings.

Continue: Call Me By Your Name Trailer

Final Portrait Review

Good

A relaxed, amusing true story about noted Swiss painter and sculptor Alberto Giacometti, this sharply well-made film feels somewhat slight, with only a wisp of a plot. But the characters are so vivid that it's thoroughly engaging, and it's written and directed by Stanley Tucci with a terrific attention to detail. So even if the plot itself barely seems to have enough fuel to keep moving, there are constant bits of comedy, drama and emotion to hold the interest.

It's set in 1964 Paris, where journalist James Lord (Armie Hammer) agrees to sit for a portrait with Alberto (Geoffrey Rush), who says it will only take a day or two. But Alberto doesn't work very quickly, painting then repainting while constantly being distracted by his favourite muse, the prostitute Caroline (Clemence Poesy). His wife Annette (Sylvie Testud) barely tolerates this, while his brother Diego (Tony Shalhoub) just shrugs it off as he assists Alberto around the studio. James watches all of this with a smirk, then becomes a little worried as days stretch into weeks and he begins to understand that for Alberto this painting will never be completed. Indeed, he never sees any of his work as ready to show to the world.

Anchored by one of Rush's best performances yet, the film is a wonderful depiction of Giacometti's artistic process, watching him produce his work with only his own inner voice to guide him. Rush plays him as a man who never lets a moment of pleasure pass him by, and everything he does is based on spontaneous impulse. So the people around him need the patience of a saint. The wry Hammer is a terrific foil for the blustering Rush, sitting with a bemused smile watching the chaos unfold around him while wondering how he can extricate himself from this situation without ruffling the artist's feathers.

Continue reading: Final Portrait Review

Cars 3 Review

Very Good

It's been six years since the last Cars movie (there were two Planes movies in that time), and the filmmakers have wisely decided to go back to basics for this one. After the sequel's foray into global spy mayhem, this movie keeps its focus on the race track. There's still that nagging lack of logic in the premise: a world of cars living like people, except that there are no people. But the oddest thing about this movie is that its themes are aimed at grown-ups, not children.

It opens as Lightning McQueen (voiced by Owen Wilson) is at the top of his career, winning every race and celebrated as a rock star. Then young upstart Jackson Storm (Armie Hammer) beats him, using high-tech training methods. To boost his speed, McQueen's sponsor (Nathan Fillion) sets him up with hot new trainer Cruz (Cristela Alonzo). But the old-school McQueen doesn't like simulators; he wants to feel sand in is tyres. So he takes Cruz on a cross-country trip to tap into his roots and show her the purity of racing on a dirt track. This involves seeking out salty old trainer Smokey (Chris Cooper) as McQueen prepares for a make-or-break race. Meanwhile, a TV pundit (Kerry Washington) drastically cuts McQueen's odds of winning any more races at all.

It's unlikely that kids in the audience will be able to identify with the central idea that you need to recognise when it's time to step aside for the younger generation. But then, they're mainly watching these movies for the vroom-vroom action, then buying the merchandise and recreating the races at home. The plot is for the adults, really, and this film provides a very nice story arc for McQueen (and Cruz as well). There is also, of course, a non-stop barrage of automotive puns and sight gags, silly side characters and wacky action. The stand-out scene is a riotous demolition derby in the mud.

Continue reading: Cars 3 Review

Armie Hammer at the premiere of King Arthur: Legend of the Sword held at the TCL Chinese Theatre - Los Angeles, California, United States - Monday 8th May 2017

Armie Hammer
Armie Hammer
Armie Hammer

Free Fire Review

Very Good

Basically a 90-minute shoot-out, there isn't a lot to this movie. British filmmaker Ben Wheatley (High-Rise) is using a group of wildly offbeat characters to play a hilarious riff on Tarantino-style dialogue and violence. So while there's not much to it, the actors have plenty of grist to bring their roles to life. Which makes the film funny and intense all the way through, even if there's no emotional connection at all.

The entire film is set in a warehouse in 1978 Boston, where Justine (Brie Larson), Chris (Cillian Murphy) and Frank (Michael Smiley) have gone with their drivers Stevo and Bernie (Jack Reynor and Enzo Cilenti) to buy a cache of guns from the swaggering Ord (Armie Hammer) and his mercurial arms dealer Vernon (Sharlto Copley), who has brought ex-Black Panther Martin (Babou Ceesay) as some muscle, plus bickering drivers Harry and Gordon (Jack Reynor and Noah Taylor). All of them greet each other tensely, but they make the deal with a bit of offhanded banter and wary respect. But just as they're all getting ready to leave, Stevo and Harry spot each other. And both are still feeling wounded after the nasty encounter they had last night.

What follows is an explosion of utterly pointless violence. All of these people are nervous and trigger-happy, so it doesn't take much to set them off. The carnage that follows isn't like most movies, because people don't get shot and just lie on the ground; they crawl off injured, regroup and rejoin the fray. Alliances shift, and every moment of panic leads to even more chaos. And right in the middle, there's a bag of cash and a crate of rifles that everyone has an eye on. Wheatley stages this in real-time, with a steady flow of jaggedly witty conversation between the gunshots and constant sight-gags in the action mayhem.

Continue reading: Free Fire Review

Armie Hammer and Timothée Chalamet at the 67th International Berlin Film Festival (Berlinale) photocall for 'Call Me by Your Name' held at Grand Hyatt Hotel, Berlin, Germany - Monday 13th February 2017

Armie Hammer
Armie Hammer
Armie Hammer and Timothée Chalamet
Armie Hammer and Timothée Chalamet
Armie Hammer
Armie Hammer

Armie Hammer at the 67th Berlin International Film Festival (Berlinale) 'Final Portrait' press conference held at Grand Hyatt Hotel - Berlin, Germany - Saturday 11th February 2017

Armie Hammer and Stanley Tucci
Armie Hammer and Stanley Tucci
Clémence Poésy, Stanley Tucci and Armie Hammer
Stanley Tucci and Armie Hammer
Stanley Tucci and Armie Hammer
Stanley Tucci and Armie Hammer

Armie Hammer at the 2017 Gold Meets Golden event held at Equinox Sports Club - Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 7th January 2017

Armie Hammer
Armie Hammer
Armie Hammer

Armie Hammer at the 2016 GQ Men of the Year Party held at Chateau Marmont, Los Angeles, California, United States - Thursday 8th December 2016

Armie Hammer
Armie Hammer
Armie Hammer
Armie Hammer
Armie Hammer
Elizabeth Chambers and Armie Hammer

Nocturnal Animals Review

Very Good

It's been seven years since designer Tom Ford made a splash with his award-winning writing-directing debut A Single Man, and it's no surprise that his second film is just as exquisitely beautiful to look at. What's unexpected is the complexity of the storytelling. Adapted by Ford from Austin Wright's novel Tony and Susan, this movie has three sides to it: a romantic drama, a darkly personal odyssey and a freaky thriller. These elements kind of fight for the audience's attention, but they're sharply played and packed with intense emotion.

Set in Los Angeles, everything revolves around gallery owner Susan (Amy Adams), who lives in a spectacular home with her banker husband Hutton (Armie Hammer), who's facing financial problems. Susan is shocked when she receives a manuscript by her ex-husband Edward (Jake Gyllenhaal), who has finally finished his long-gestating novel. But as she reads it, she realises that their break-up inspired the story, and she pictures Edward in the central role as Tony, a man travelling through Texas with his wife and daughter (Isla Fisher and Ellie Bamber), who are kidnapped and brutalised by roadside thugs led by the unstable Ray (Aaron Taylor-Johnson). So Tony teams up with jaded detective Bobby (Michael Shannon) to track them down.

The film's central narrative is Susan's deeply internalised discovery of her own dark soul, which plays out both in her scenes with Hutton and figuratively in the fictional thriller narrative. All of these things take complex twists and turns that have vivid moral shadings. But of course the Wild West action element continually steals focus from the more understated personal drama. In this sense, Gyllenhaal has the trickiest role, or rather two roles, as the story's catalyst and victim. Meanwhile, Adams is strikingly transparent as Susan, engaging in jagged interaction with both Gyllenhaal's enigmatic Edward and Hammer's eerily heartless Hutton.

Continue reading: Nocturnal Animals Review

The Man From U.N.C.L.E. Review

Very Good

Adopting a deliciously groovy vibe, Guy Ritchie turns the iconic 1960s TV spy series into a flashy action-comedy. There's absolutely nothing to this frothy romp, but it's packed with hilarious characters and lively action scenes that continually surprise the audience with inventive twists on the genre. And it just might turn the suave, fast-talking Henry Cavill and the brooding, engaging Armie Hammer into A-list stars in the process.

It opens in 1963 East Berlin, where ex-con CIA operative Napoleon Solo (Cavill) is trying to help sexy mechanic Gaby (Alicia Vikander) escape to the West, chased by his nemesis, KGB agent Illya Kuryakin (Hammer). Gaby's father is a nuclear scientist on the verge of selling his secrets to a rogue Italian billionaire couple (Elizabeth Debicki and Luca Calvani) so, even though the Cold War is raging, the CIA and KGB decide to cooperate on the mission. This means that rivals Solo and Illya must work together as they travel to Rome with Gaby, making contact with British agent Waverly (Hugh Grant) and Gaby's creepy uncle (Sylvester Goth). And of course, there are unexpected wrinkles along the way.

As always, Ritchie cleverly subverts each set-piece, letting chase scenes unfold in carefully staged but enjoyably inventive ways, often putting the real action in the background while the characters act as if they're above all this nastiness. As popcorn entertainment, this is first-rate, with a cast that's more than up to the challenge. Cavill is particularly smooth, a Bond-style spy who seems unable to resist seducing every pretty woman he meets. Hammer's role is pricklier, since Illya never quite relaxes, although his petulance makes him just as likeable. Their interplay is snappy and often very funny but, unlike Ritchie's similarly toned Sherlock Holmes movies, this strains to avoid being a bromance. Solo and Illya continue to spy on each other right to the end, maintaining their Cold War distance even as they team up to save the world.

Continue reading: The Man From U.N.C.L.E. Review

The Man From U.N.C.L.E. - Henry Cavill & Armie Hammer Interview


An Interview with Henry Cavill & Armie Hammer on The Man From U.N.C.L.E.

Henry Cavill and Armie Hammer star opposite each other in the big screen re-boot of the popular 60s spy series 'The Man From U.N.C.L.E.', out on August 14th 2015. In a new interview, the actors open up about working with director Guy Ritchie, who brought a lot of calm to the otherwise action-packed set.

Continue reading: The Man From U.N.C.L.E. - Henry Cavill & Armie Hammer Interview

The Man From U.N.C.L.E - Comic Con Trailer


America and Russia have never seen eye to eye, but they do have some of the best government spies the world has to offer. Now's the time to put their differences aside in a bid to fight the real enemy - crime - as an international organised gang find themselves in possession of an atomic bomb powerful enough to kill billions. Napoleon Solo and Illya Kuryakin, American and Russian agents respectively, are thrust together as a team to hunt down the criminals and save the world, returning the destructive weapon to the CIA. However, predictably, it's not the most comfortable of duos, but perhaps these competitive professionals can use their animosity usefully, because they're about to face off against some unlikely and dangerous suspects.

Continue: The Man From U.N.C.L.E - Comic Con Trailer

The Man from U.N.C.L.E. - International Trailer


Napoleon Solo and Illya Kuryakin are American and Russian government agents respectively - and an unlikely team given America's long history with the European nation. Unfortunately for them, whether they like each other or not, they have no choice but to band together to save the world from a deadly threat. A criminal organisation with global membership have managed to get their hands on an atom bomb with which they could destroy billions of lives, so they have to investigate to ensure it's returned safely to the American government before anyone can get hurt. Along the way though they meet some unlikely suspects, including femme fatale Victoria Vinciguerra, and team up with another feisty agent named Gaby Teller. They are willing to do anything to succeed in their mission. They have the skills to save the world. They are U.N.C.L.E.

Continue: The Man from U.N.C.L.E. - International Trailer

The Man From U.N.C.L.E - Teaser Trailer


Throughout the early 1960s, the Cold War was in full swing. Two agents, one from Russia and one from America are at each other's throats throughout the conflict. Napoleon Solo (Henry Cavill) is a CIA agent, known for his suave and womanising nature. Illya Kuryakin (Armie Hammer) is a KGB known for his brutality and deadly efficiency. When a criminal organisation sprouts from former Nazi soldiers, Russia and America temporarily put aside their differences to find a solution to the problem. Unfortunately, getting the two men (who have made a career out of trying to kill one another) to work together, may not be as easy as it seems.

Continue: The Man From U.N.C.L.E - Teaser Trailer

Armie Hammer

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Armie Hammer

Date of birth

28th August, 1986

Occupation

Actor

Sex

Male

Height

1.96


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Armie Hammer Movies

Call Me By Your Name Trailer

Call Me By Your Name Trailer

It's the summer of 1983 and 24-year-old Oliver has returned from his studies in America...

Final Portrait Movie Review

Final Portrait Movie Review

A relaxed, amusing true story about noted Swiss painter and sculptor Alberto Giacometti, this sharply...

Cars 3 Movie Review

Cars 3 Movie Review

It's been six years since the last Cars movie (there were two Planes movies in...

Cars 3 Trailer

Cars 3 Trailer

Former Piston Cup Champion Lightning McQueen was a hero in his day, but it seems...

Free Fire Movie Review

Free Fire Movie Review

Basically a 90-minute shoot-out, there isn't a lot to this movie. British filmmaker Ben Wheatley...

Free Fire Trailer

Free Fire Trailer

It's 1978 Boston and an unlikely gang made up of Justine (Brie Larson), Stevo (Sam...

Cars 3 Trailer

Cars 3 Trailer

Lightning McQueen may be a legendary name in the Piston Cup Championship history, but as...

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The Birth of a Nation Movie Review

The Birth of a Nation Movie Review

This true story from 19th century America feels eerily relevant today in its depiction of...

Nocturnal Animals Movie Review

Nocturnal Animals Movie Review

It's been seven years since designer Tom Ford made a splash with his award-winning writing-directing...

Nocturnal Animals Trailer

Nocturnal Animals Trailer

For a short time, Edward and Susan had a happy marriage, they lived in a...

The Birth Of A Nation Trailer

The Birth Of A Nation Trailer

Nat Turner was a former slave who on witnessing the scope of slavery across America...

The Man From U.N.C.L.E. Movie Review

The Man From U.N.C.L.E. Movie Review

Adopting a deliciously groovy vibe, Guy Ritchie turns the iconic 1960s TV spy series into...

The Man From U.N.C.L.E - Comic Con Trailer

The Man From U.N.C.L.E - Comic Con Trailer

America and Russia have never seen eye to eye, but they do have some of...

The Man from U.N.C.L.E. - International Trailer

The Man from U.N.C.L.E. - International Trailer

Napoleon Solo and Illya Kuryakin are American and Russian government agents respectively - and an...

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