Arielle Kebbel

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The Beverly Hilton 60th 'Diamond' Anniversary Celebration

Arielle Kebbel - The Beverly Hilton 60th 'Diamond' Anniversary Celebration at the Aqua Star Pool - Arrivals at The Beverly Hilton Hotel - Los Angeles, California, United States - Friday 21st August 2015

Arielle Kebbel
Arielle Kebbel
Arielle Kebbel
Arielle Kebbel
Arielle Kebbel

The Beverly Hilton 60th 'Diamond' Anniversary Celebration

Beau Dunn , Arielle Kebbel - The Beverly Hilton 60th 'Diamond' Anniversary Celebration at the Aqua Star Pool - Inside at The Beverly Hilton Hotel - Los Angeles, California, United States - Friday 21st August 2015

Beau Dunn and Arielle Kebbel
Beau Dunn and Arielle Kebbel
Beau Dunn and Arielle Kebbel
Beau Dunn and Arielle Kebbel
Beau Dunn and Arielle Kebbel

The Beverly Hilton 60th 'diamond' anniversary celebration

Arielle Kebbel - The Beverly Hilton 60th 'diamond' anniversary celebration at the Aqua Star Pool at The Beverly Hilton, Aqua Star Pool - Los Angeles, California, United States - Friday 21st August 2015

Arielle Kebbel
Arielle Kebbel
Arielle Kebbel
Arielle Kebbel
Arielle Kebbel

An Evening with UnREAL at Paley

Arielle Kebbel - An Evening with UnREAL at Paley at Paley Center for Media - Beverly Hills, California, United States - Friday 31st July 2015

Arielle Kebbel

Celebrities visit Craig's restaurant

Arielle Kebbel - Celebrities visit Craig's restaurant - Los Angeles, California, United States - Tuesday 14th July 2015

Arielle Kebbel
Arielle Kebbel
Arielle Kebbel
Arielle Kebbel

The Brooklyn Brothers Beat the Best Review


OK
Fans of whimsical American indie movies will enjoy this ramshackle road comedy about a couple of losers who only come to life when they play their music. It's charming and cute, but there isn't much to it.

Lovelorn singer-songwriter Alex (O'Nan) is struggling to survive in New York after the departure of his latest musical partner (Ritter). And when he loses his day job, he decides to head back across country to stay with his older brother (McCarthy). Before he leaves, he has an encounter with crazed stalker-fan Jim (Weston), who proposes that they become a double-act and take a cross-country tour to an L.A. battle of the bands. He reluctantly goes along with this, and is even more nervous about letting the rather aggressive Cassidy (Kebbel) join them.

Continue reading: The Brooklyn Brothers Beat the Best Review

The Brooklyn Brothers Beat The Best Trailer


Ditched by his beloved, budding musician Alex thinks things can't get much worse. But when he's fired by both his band mate and eventually his real estate office boss, it's safe to say that he hits rockbottom. Performing gigs at every opportunity (including a special needs school), he is in dire need of his big break. That's were Jim comes in. Jim is a musical enthusiast who develops big ideas after hearing Alex perform. He books a string of US tour dates for the two of them to embark on together to Alex's initial resentment and utter reluctance. Their amateur performances kick off at a wobbly start but the pair eventually start to bounce of one another and create a new sound that sparks interest from audiences. However, the tour comes to an abrupt halt when their unreliable 'tour manager' Cassidy abandons them and Alex is forced to quit the tour and escape to his brother's house where he goes on a journey of self-discovery.

Continue: The Brooklyn Brothers Beat The Best Trailer

I Melt With You Trailer


Jonathan; Ron; Richard and Tim met at college 25 years ago and have been friends ever since. Jonathan is a doctor; Ron is a banker and Richard is a English teacher at a high school. This year is no different from any other year: the four men leave their families and careers to rent a beach house in California for a week, which is spent partying with college girls and an extortionate amount of booze and drugs.

Continue: I Melt With You Trailer

Vampires Suck Review


Grim
Every time we see a new Friedberg/Seltzer film we hope maybe they've learned something and put their skills to more creative use. But no, instead we're once again astounded that anyone gives them money to make these unfunny rehashes.

When the mopey Becca (Proske) moves back to live with her small-town sheriff dad (Bader), she feels her life can't get any worse. Her childhood friend Jacob (Riggi) is acting rather strange, and she finds herself attracted to the sullen Edward (Lanter). As three vampires (Britt, Weber and Brobst) maraud through the landscape, Becca and Edward struggle not to consummate their relationship. And when Edward runs off to hide, Jacob makes his move. Note: Yes, this is virtually the exact plot of the first two Twilight movies.

Continue reading: Vampires Suck Review

The Uninvited Review


Terrible
As part of our ongoing battle with mortality, ghosts have become a comforting conduit to "the other side." No longer are they purely spectral poltergeists bent on driving the living insane. Instead, if you believe most of the movies made since the arrival of Eastern horror on these Western shores, these supernatural envoys are hell-bent on warning the living about the unholy terrors crawling beneath their very noses. In the case of the burnt-up phantom at the center of this remake of the Korean hit A Tale of Two Sisters, the message is loud and clear: Stay away from the incessantly dull American version.

After 10 months in a psychiatric hospital, young Anna Rydell (Emily Browning) returns to her family home in Maine. There she must face a distant father (David Strathairn), sarcastic sister Alex (Arielle Kebbel), and the newest member of the clan, nurse turned girlfriend Rachel Summers (Elizabeth Banks). You see, Anna's mother got very sick -- so sick that Dad had to hire a blond bimbette to care for her. Naturally, their relationship turned sexual, and all Anna remembers a bell, a fire, a horrific death, and a stint in the loony bin. Now that she's back, she wants to remember what happened -- and all signs point to Rachel as some kind of brash black widow. Anna is convinced that her Dad's new galpal is out to destroy the family, and there are ghosts from a supernatural realm who appear to agree.

Continue reading: The Uninvited Review

John Tucker Must Die Review


Grim
John Tucker is a really lucky kid. Not only is he the king of his high school - a real "man's man, ladies' man, man about town" for the under-18 set - but he also has the advantage of being the top dog at the movie version of high school, one filled with an endless stream of hot girls, gobs of money, and no adults in sight.

But the goofily-titled, predictable, and mildly charming John Tucker Must Die is all about the golden child getting his comeuppance. John, played by an endearing (if vacuous) Jesse Metcalfe, is the star of the basketball team and a chronic womanizer. He's got a system down that keeps him in as many open arms as possible, wherein he simultaneously dates hotties from rival cliques, ones who would never deign to speak to one another long enough to dish secrets, and then claims to each that he's not allowed to date during the basketball season. But three of them - shallow head cheerleader Heather (Ashanti), ditsy vegan activist Beth (Sophia Bush), and tightly-wound, overachieving Carrie (Arielle Kebbel) - figure it out. And super-sweet, casual observer Kate (Brittany Snow) inspires them to go the way of women scorned and get themselves some revenge.

Continue reading: John Tucker Must Die Review

The Grudge 2 Review


Grim
Low cost and high quality: Japan is king when it comes to assembly line production ethos and Grudge 2 director Takashi Shimizu takes that manufacturing approach in constructing this latest edition in the Grudge series. Block by block, shock by shock, he builds a movie that runs fine and looks slick. It's a solid product in terms of celluloid, but there is no soul, no artistry, in the merchandise. What went wrong? Enthusiasm. Shimizu seems to take pride only in the technical proficiency of his work. Actors be damned. Plot be damned. While there's nothing wrong with a really well-made but vacuous art-horror film (Dario Argento's entire canon fits this mold), there is no art in the Grudge 2, just cleverly staged shock shots stapled on to the other like the reels of skin in Sion Soto's Suicide Club (had to plug some good J-horror here somewhere.)

Perhaps this calculating demeanor is because Shimizu's essentially made the same film six times now. The first Ju-on in 2000. The second in 2000 as well. Then he did both of them again in 2003. Then the American remake in 2004. That makes Grudge 2 the sixth version of the same film made in only six years. (In between he made the similar Marebito and Rinne.) It's not surprising that the film feels mechanized, paint by numbers. Shimizu has either got it down so pat that he can operate on autopilot or he's just bored senseless.

Continue reading: The Grudge 2 Review

The Grudge 2 Review


Grim
Low cost and high quality: Japan is king when it comes to assembly line production ethos and Grudge 2 director Takashi Shimizu takes that manufacturing approach in constructing this latest edition in the Grudge series. Block by block, shock by shock, he builds a movie that runs fine and looks slick. It's a solid product in terms of celluloid, but there is no soul, no artistry, in the merchandise. What went wrong? Enthusiasm. Shimizu seems to take pride only in the technical proficiency of his work. Actors be damned. Plot be damned. While there's nothing wrong with a really well-made but vacuous art-horror film (Dario Argento's entire canon fits this mold), there is no art in the Grudge 2, just cleverly staged shock shots stapled on to the other like the reels of skin in Sion Soto's Suicide Club (had to plug some good J-horror here somewhere.)

Perhaps this calculating demeanor is because Shimizu's essentially made the same film six times now. The first Ju-on in 2000. The second in 2000 as well. Then he did both of them again in 2003. Then the American remake in 2004. That makes Grudge 2 the sixth version of the same film made in only six years. (In between he made the similar Marebito and Rinne.) It's not surprising that the film feels mechanized, paint by numbers. Shimizu has either got it down so pat that he can operate on autopilot or he's just bored senseless.

Continue reading: The Grudge 2 Review

John Tucker Must Die Review


Grim
John Tucker is a really lucky kid. Not only is he the king of his high school - a real "man's man, ladies' man, man about town" for the under-18 set - but he also has the advantage of being the top dog at the movie version of high school, one filled with an endless stream of hot girls, gobs of money, and no adults in sight.

But the goofily-titled, predictable, and mildly charming John Tucker Must Die is all about the golden child getting his comeuppance. John, played by an endearing (if vacuous) Jesse Metcalfe, is the star of the basketball team and a chronic womanizer. He's got a system down that keeps him in as many open arms as possible, wherein he simultaneously dates hotties from rival cliques, ones who would never deign to speak to one another long enough to dish secrets, and then claims to each that he's not allowed to date during the basketball season. But three of them - shallow head cheerleader Heather (Ashanti), ditsy vegan activist Beth (Sophia Bush), and tightly-wound, overachieving Carrie (Arielle Kebbel) - figure it out. And super-sweet, casual observer Kate (Brittany Snow) inspires them to go the way of women scorned and get themselves some revenge.

Continue reading: John Tucker Must Die Review

Aquamarine Review


Weak
I wouldn't normally even try to review a teenybopper movie like Aquamarine, but I'm doing so for two reasons. First, it's in the bottom 100 of all movies, according to the silly and notoriously irrelevant "weighted average" of user ratings at the IMDb. Second, it's the first movie my three-year-old daughter sat through all the way without losing interest. We're talking about a kid who begs to wear a Cinderella dress when she gets home from school, but has yet to sit still through any Disney movie. That's something.

Anyhoo, Aquamarine is a mermaid movie, or rather, "the mermaid movie," as my daughter now calls it, about two best friends (Julia's niece Emma Roberts and teen singer JoJo) who find a lovely (and equally hormonally teenaged) mermaid washed into the oceanside pool at the motel run by Claire's (Roberts) family. With Hailey (JoJo), they teach the newly-legged Aquamarine (Sara Paxton) about land-based life, while she teaches the gawky girls how to use starfish as earrings. But Aqua's on a quest. In keeping with all mermaid movies, she's looking for love. And she figures the first guy she sees, a hunky lifeguard, will be it.

Continue reading: Aquamarine Review

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