Antony Sher

Antony Sher

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The Wolfman Review


Weak
This B-movie made on an epic budget is so over-the-top that the earlier you start giggling the better. Even though it's played dead straight, it's an old-style monster romp that couldn't be any more camp if it tried.

American-raised actor Lawrence (Del Toro) returns to his family manor on an English moor, where his wild-haired father Sir John (Hopkins) lives with his Sikh servant (Malik). Lawrence discovers that his brother has just been killed in the woods by a vicious creature, which later wounds him as well, turning him into a werewolf. And on the first full moon, he finds himself on the hunt as well as chased by a Scotland Yard detective (Weaving). But maybe a gypsy woman (Chaplin) and his brother's ex-fiancee (Blunt) hold the key to his salvation.

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Erik The Viking Review


OK
First things first: Terry Jones' Erik the Viking is not a Monty Python film. In fact, only two Pythons appear in it at all.

The film is based on Jones' own children's stories, about vikings living in the dark, war-torn age of Ragnarok. Fed up with all the killing and looting, Erik (a not-so-famous Tim Robbins) leads his villagemates on a quest across the sea to find Valhalla, which involves a magical horn, the edge of the world, an island with no violence (which is a problem for vikings), and of course the usual pillager vandal types on their tale.

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Mrs. Brown Review


Good
Judi Dench earned an Oscar nod for her spot-on portrayal of the troubled Queen Victoria (two years before winning an Oscar for repeat royal performances as Queen Elizabeth in two 1999 films). In the 1860s, Victoria was inconsolable after the death of her beloved husband, so she sends for hubby's favorite horsemaster, Mr. Brown (Connolly). Brown succeeds in bringing her out of her coccoon of misery, but not without drawing the attention of a nosy press and nearly toppling the monarchy in the process. The socio-political side of Mrs. Brown is not so well-realized as the emotional side of the relationship between Brown and Victoria, a gut-wrenching analysis of station and the politics of the heart.
Antony Sher

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