Anne Revere

Anne Revere

Anne Revere Quick Links

Film RSS

The Thin Man Goes Home Review


OK
In this fifth installment of the Thin Man series, the Charleses leave New York for some rest and relaxation at Nick's parents' home in the small town of Sycamore Springs (boo!) but leave precious little Nick Jr. at boarding school (yay!). Coming a decade after the original film, this time out, William Powell and Myrna Loy are as devastatingly debonair as ever, though it doesn't stop them from playing at a little physical comedy when needed. Loy's willowy gorgeousness adds to, instead of detracts from, her comic timing, while Powell remains the coolest character in just about any room, even with that big Walter Matthau-size schnozz and ridiculous moustache.

While it would likely have been heretical to the characters' creator Dashiell Hammett, the couple seems to have given up liquor, with Nick compulsively nipping at a flask of nonalcoholic cider. This doesn't stop Nora from mistrusting his ability to stay on the wagon, and wishing maybe that he would ("Sneaking off like that and getting drunk ... without me."). The film eases ever so slowly into the mystery that we know is coming, following the couple up to the town on the town, and setting up Nick's relationship with his stern and disapproving father. The mystery, which involves a horrid painting of a windmill that everyone wants to get their hands on, Maltese Falcon-like, and a townful of neighbors who keep stopping by, wondering if Nick is working on a case. He'd prefer not to and would rather sit in a hammock with his cider jug and reading Nick Carter detective stories, but he gets sort of goaded into it once the stranger shows up on Nick's parents' doorstep and gets shot before he can get a full sentence out.

Continue reading: The Thin Man Goes Home Review

Fallen Angel Review


Good
Don't you just love a good film noir? Turn down the lights, pop the popcorn, and sit back. Those suits. Those hats. Those dames. Those schemes. Those big black cars. Those fatal gunshots that leave no bullet holes and cause no bleeding. What's not to love?

Otto Preminger's Fallen Angel is a textbook example of well-crafted noir. It has the just right mix of atmosphere, characters, and flim-flammery. The mysterious Eric Stanton (Dana Andrews) arrives in a small coastal California town and stops in at a diner called, naturally, Pop's Eats, to do some advance promotion for an itinerant phony psychic who will be putting on a show the next night. Within moments, he's deeply in love with the waitress, the classicly noir Stella (Linda Darnell), a real looker with great gams and a tough attitude. Those lips, those eyes, those barbed remarks... Eric's in love.

Continue reading: Fallen Angel Review

A Place In The Sun Review


Excellent
The classic tragedy, in classic form. Disturbing and powerful considering its time (1951), this film, based on the novel An American Tragedy, features Clift's greatest performance as a working-class guy wooed by an assembly line worker (Winters) and a ritzy chick (Taylor). The Pandora's box he opens when one is accidentally killed makes for a timeless tragedy.

The Thin Man Goes Home Review


OK
In this fifth installment of the Thin Man series, the Charleses leave New York for some rest and relaxation at Nick's parents' home in the small town of Sycamore Springs (boo!) but leave precious little Nick Jr. at boarding school (yay!). Coming a decade after the original film, this time out, William Powell and Myrna Loy are as devastatingly debonair as ever, though it doesn't stop them from playing at a little physical comedy when needed. Loy's willowy gorgeousness adds to, instead of detracts from, her comic timing, while Powell remains the coolest character in just about any room, even with that big Walter Matthau-size schnozz and ridiculous moustache.

While it would likely have been heretical to the characters' creator Dashiell Hammett, the couple seems to have given up liquor, with Nick compulsively nipping at a flask of nonalcoholic cider. This doesn't stop Nora from mistrusting his ability to stay on the wagon, and wishing maybe that he would ("Sneaking off like that and getting drunk ... without me."). The film eases ever so slowly into the mystery that we know is coming, following the couple up to the town on the town, and setting up Nick's relationship with his stern and disapproving father. The mystery, which involves a horrid painting of a windmill that everyone wants to get their hands on, Maltese Falcon-like, and a townful of neighbors who keep stopping by, wondering if Nick is working on a case. He'd prefer not to and would rather sit in a hammock with his cider jug and reading Nick Carter detective stories, but he gets sort of goaded into it once the stranger shows up on Nick's parents' doorstep and gets shot before he can get a full sentence out.

Continue reading: The Thin Man Goes Home Review

National Velvet Review


Good
A young Liz Taylor, standing eye to eye with an adult Mickey Rooney, stars in this classic children's fable at a girl and her horse, named The Pi. Rooney is a down-on-his-luck ex-jockey who encounters the Brown family, working as a general servant but taking to young Velvet (Taylor) when she comes into the ownership of a wild gelding. On sheer determination, she enters The Pi into the Grand National steeplechase, a grueling horse race in which she eventually rides herself (scandal!). Great fun for the youngsters among you, but I don't know how much "sheer determination" us adults can stand at once.

Gentleman's Agreement Review


Good
Gregory Peck masquerades as a Jew to write a big story on Anti-Semitism in this wartime tale of prejudice, bigotry, and hipocracy. Not exactly light-hearted fare, and the now 50+ year-old film has aged to the point of near-irrelevance. Peck and McGuire are incredible as the leads, but (and this is a good thing), Jew-bashing has faded as a commonly-experienced social ill. While it still crops up, the "restricted clubs" and playground abuse of Gentleman's Agreement are things of the past. Very controversial in its day, not to mention director Elia Kazan, who has generated plenty of controversy in recent years as well.
Anne Revere

Anne Revere Quick Links

Film RSS
Advertisement

Suggested

Eric Clapton: Live At The Royal Albert Hall - Trailer

Eric Clapton: Live At The Royal Albert Hall - Trailer

The full recording of 'Eric Clapton: Live At The Royal Albert Hall', is set to reach cinemas very soon

Idris Elba Posts Great Response To Anthony Horowitz's Apology After

Idris Elba Posts Great Response To Anthony Horowitz's Apology After "Street" Remark

Horowitz was originally asked whether he thought Idris Elba would be suitable for the role of the next 007.

No Escape - Movie Review

No Escape - Movie Review

One of the strongest action thrillers in recent years, this gripping movie cleverly casts actors known for comedy in the central roles.

Ricki and the Flash - Movie Review

Ricki and the Flash - Movie Review

Meryl Streep is having so much fun playing an ageing rocker that the audience only barely registers that this film isn't nearly as deep as it's...

Advertisement
Creamfields Festival 2015 Live Review

Creamfields Festival 2015 Live Review

Creamfields was back again, with a plethora of headline disc jockeys, showcasing Creamfields as the powerhouse of UK-electronic festivals.

Donald Trump Can't Wait To Run Against Kanye In 2020

Donald Trump Can't Wait To Run Against Kanye In 2020

The 2016 Republican candidate is already thinking ahead

Keith Richards Hoping To Start On A New Rolling Stones Album

Keith Richards Hoping To Start On A New Rolling Stones Album "Next Year"

Richards is eager to begin work on follow-up to 2005's 'A Bigger Bang', but doesn't reckon that will happen until April 2016 at the earliest.

Cate Blanchett Cast As Lucille Ball In New Biopic

Cate Blanchett Cast As Lucille Ball In New Biopic

The two-time Oscar winner has been cast as '50s TV sweetheart Lucille Ball, according to new reports.

Advertisement