Anne Reid

Anne Reid

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Evening Standard Theatre Awards

Anne Reid - The Evening Standard Theatre Awards held at the Old Vic - Arrivals - London, United Kingdom - Sunday 22nd November 2015

Anne Reid
Anne Reid
Anne Reid

Celebrities At The ITV Studios

Anne Reid - Anne Reid outside ITV Studios today - London, United Kingdom - Monday 14th September 2015

Anne Reid
Anne Reid
Anne Reid
Anne Reid
Anne Reid
Anne Reid

The 2015 TV Choice Awards - Arrivals

Anne Reid - The 2015 TV Choice Awards held at the Hilton Park Lane - Arrivals - London, United Kingdom - Monday 7th September 2015

Anne Reid
Anne Reid

The TV Choice Awards

Anne Reid - The 2015 TV Choice Awards held at the Hilton Park Lane. - London, United Kingdom - Monday 7th September 2015

Anne Reid

Anne Reid Scared Before Sex Scene With Daniel Craig In The Mother


Anne Reid Daniel Craig James Bond

Anne Reid wishes she'd ''gone for the sex more'' during a raunchy scene with Daniel Craig.

The 80-year-old actress shared an intimate moment with the James Bond star in 2003 movie 'The Mother' and was so nervous about being a ''laughing stock'', she got drunk before filming the scene.

In an interview with GayTimes.co.uk, she recalled: ''The night before I got drunk. It's not something I would leap to do again.

Continue reading: Anne Reid Scared Before Sex Scene With Daniel Craig In The Mother

Believe Review


Very Good

With its heart in the right place, this charming British football drama overcomes a script that frequently drifts into sentimentality and corny plotting. But the story is involving, and the cast is particularly good. So even though it has a tendency to drift into cuteness, a fresh sense of humour and sympathetic characters help build up a swell of honest emotion as it approaches the final whistle.

It's set in 1984 Manchester, where the legendary Manchester United manager Matt Busby (Brian Cox) is still haunted by the Munich plane crash in 1958 that took the lives of several of his dream-team players. In search of something to give meaning to his retirement years, he runs across a street-smart 10-year-old named Georgie (Jack Smith), who has his own issues. Georgie lives with his working-class single mum Erica (Natascha McElhone), who worries about his future and leaps at the chance of a scholarship to send him to a posh private school. Georgie isn't thrilled about studying for the entrance exam with snooty professor Farquar (Toby Stephens); he'd rather be out kicking a ball with his friends, and is secretly plotting to enter a youth competition with them. But they need an adult sponsor, so Matt and his friend Bob (Philip Jackson) agree to take them on. And the kids have no idea that they're being trained by a national icon.

Director David Scheinmann shoots the film with sundrenched charm, grounding the goofier moments by encouraging the cast to give deeply felt performances. At the centre, Cox and Jackson are an entertaining double act as old pals kickstarting their lives by taking on this young team overflowing with raw talent but no discipline. McElhone is essentially playing the standard movie mother who's too busy with the pressures of everyday life to notice much of anything that her tearaway son is doing, but she gives the role a sharp emotional centre. Stephens has more trouble in his rather wacky role, which drifts from callous nastiness to physical slapstick.

Continue reading: Believe Review

The Oldie Of The Year Awards

Anne Reid - The Oldie of the Year Awards - Arrivals - London, United Kingdom - Tuesday 4th February 2014

Anne Reid
Anne Reid
Anne Reid
Anne Reid
Anne Reid
Anne Reid

Song For Marion Review


Good

By focussing on the emotional bleakness in this story, writer-director Williams manages to find some interesting moments in a film that otherwise seems contrived to reach fans of heartwarming fare like The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel and Quartet. And while this film sometimes feels like a geriatric episode of Glee, it at least finds authenticity in the characters' emotions, thanks to clever acting and filmmaking.

It opens with an ageing couple: the perpetually cheery Marion (Redgrave) and her relentless grump of a husband Arthur (Stamp). "You know how I feel about enjoying things," he scowls as she chirps about him coming along to cheer for her singing club at an upcoming competition. But Marion has cancer, and she's trying to make sure that he doesn't shut down when she dies, cutting off contact with his single-dad son (Eccleston). Sure enough, he reacts to her death with cruelty and isolation. But Marion's relentlessly upbeat choir leader Elizabeth (Arterton) won't give up on him, and when she discovers that he can sing, she urges him to take Marion's place at the competition.

After the strikingly original thrillers London to Brighton and Cherry Tree Lane, this is not the kind of film we expect from Williams, but if we look closely we can see him constantly undermining expectations. This film isn't quite as heartwarming as it seems, allowing its characters to be rather startlingly awful at times even though the story is punctuated by uplifting sequences. And of course the veteran cast members are excellent. Redgrave is luminous as Marion, holding the film's emotional centre even after her character is gone. And Stamp quietly reveals a hidden tenderness under Arthur's rough exterior. 

Continue reading: Song For Marion Review

Derek Jacobi And Anne Reid Impress In BBC Rom-Com Last Tango In Halifax


Derek Jacobi Anne Reid

Last night (November 20, 2012), Last Tango in Halifax debuted on BBC1. Set in Yorkshire, it’s a tale of love between two widows, who were formerly childhood sweethearts (played by Sir Derek Jacobi and Anne Reid). Thanks to the wonders of everybody’s favourite social networking site (that’s Facebook, in case you’re unaware), they meet up after fifty years and romance begins to blossom.

Reviews for the new series are largely positive. Unsurprisingly, Jacobi’s performance was praised, as was Reid’s. Writing for The Independent, Simon Usborne praised the programme’s makers for not patronising older viewers and also for managing to engage younger ones. “But it triumphed because it wasn't about old people or even elderly romance, but love. This (sentimental) 30-year-old loved every minute,” wrote Usborne. John Crace, of The Guardian, was less accepting of the “bitter-sweet rom-com,” suggesting that the likelihood of the two central characters getting together was a touch too obvious. However, despite describing Last Tango In Halifax as “”terribly familiar and predictable,” he admitted that it was, in fact “not at all bad,” saved by the quality of the acting.

Looking past the “cheap shot” of the programme’s title, The Metro also found much to love in Last Tango In Halifax. “The story plays as a wistful reflection on the way the world has changed,” though the sub-plots are widely damned for being “ludicrous.” A good start, then, for this heart-warming tale.

Cemetery Junction Review


OK
There's a strong autobiographical tone to this British period drama, and the cast is very good. But by never focussing the story in a meaningful way, the film pales in comparison to its nearest predecessor, An Education.

In the Cemetery Junction area of Reading in 1973, Freddie (Cooke) is a young guy just starting a new job selling insurance while his best friend Bruce (Hughes) still works in the local factory and their goofy pal Snork (Doolan) makes announcements at the train station. Freddie clearly has ambition, and is happy when he runs into old flame Julie (Jones), who turns out to be the fiancee of his supervisor (Goode) and daughter of the company boss (Fiennes).

But both Freddie and Julie have doubts about heading into suburban respectability.

Continue reading: Cemetery Junction Review

Liam Review


Very Good
Stuttering Liam (Anthony Borrows) has problems like you wouldn't believe. For starters, he lives in Liverpool during the Depression. He's also pummelled with Catholic doctrine at school. Dad's out of work. Sis has to work as a maid for a wealthy Jewish family. And of course, there's the stutter.

Stephen Frears (High Fidelity) directs this powerful and moving work about a small facet of the past, and it's interesting to see him work without his trademark, wry humor as found in similar working-class-in-the-UK productions like The Van and The Snapper. Ian Hart is apt as the down-and-out father who gets sucked into anti-Jewish Fascism (thus endangering poor sis's breadwinning), and Borrows is a put-upon and precocious (yet not disgustingly so) kid in the tradition of Angela's Ashes.

Continue reading: Liam Review

The Mother Review


Weak
I feel as if I've seen The Mother at least five times since 2001. A woman, ranging in age from 40 to 70, discovers that her life, for lack of a better word, sucks. Through some event ranging from the random (meeting a stranger on a street) to the life-altering (husband dies), our heroine gains her independence and finds bottomless passion, even love.

Watching The Mother, it's obvious that director Roger Michell and writer Hanif Kureishi, spent a little too much time watching Unfaithful or Bread and Tulips. They offer few original points in their own movie, and express autumnal passion at the expense of common sense. Really, The Mother is as exploitative and flashy as any big-budget summer blockbuster. The only difference is that this movie probably isn't part of a Happy Meal deal.

Continue reading: The Mother Review

Crowe Leads Race For London Critics' Awards


Russell Crowe Master And Commander The Lord Of The Rings Ed Harris The Hours Sean Penn Bill Murray Nicolas Cage Nicole Kidman Cold Mountain Meryl Streep Scarlett Johansson Julianne Moore Far From Heaven Young Adam The Magdalene Sisters The Mother Jude Law Paul Bettany Julie Walters Helen Mirren Calendar Girls Charlotte Rampling Anne Reid Etre Et Avoir

Russell Crowe's latest film Master And Commander: THE FAR SIDE OF THE WORLD has garnered an impressive six nominations for the LONDON FILM CRITICS' CIRCLE AWARDS.

Among its possible wins are Best Film, Best Director for PETE WEIR and Best Actor for Crowe. The Lord Of The Rings: THE RETURN OF THE KING and MYSTIC RIVER will also battle it out for Best Film, while Crowe will be competing for his gong with Ed Harris (The Hours), Sean Penn (Mystic River), Bill Murray (LOST IN TRANSLATION) and Nicholas Cage (ADAPTATION).

Best Actress contenders include Nicole Kidman (Cold Mountain), HOLLY HUNTER (THIRTEEN), Meryl Streep (Adaptation), Scarlett Johansson (GIRL WITH A PEARL EARRING) and Julianne Moore (Far From Heaven).

Continue reading: Crowe Leads Race For London Critics' Awards

Anne Reid

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Anne Reid Movies

Believe Movie Review

Believe Movie Review

With its heart in the right place, this charming British football drama overcomes a script...

Song for Marion Movie Review

Song for Marion Movie Review

By focussing on the emotional bleakness in this story, writer-director Williams manages to find some...

Cemetery Junction Movie Review

Cemetery Junction Movie Review

There's a strong autobiographical tone to this British period drama, and the cast is very...

Liam Movie Review

Liam Movie Review

Stuttering Liam (Anthony Borrows) has problems like you wouldn't believe. For starters, he lives...

The Mother Movie Review

The Mother Movie Review

I feel as if I've seen The Mother at least five times since 2001. A...

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