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Anne Archer - US actress Anne Archer attends a photocall for her upcoming starring role in 'The Trial of Jane Fonda' at the Park Theatre, London - London, United Kingdom - Thursday 21st April 2016

Anne Archer
Anne Archer
Anne Archer
Anne Archer
Anne Archer
Anne Archer

Anne Archer - Photocall for the upcoming production of 'The Trial of Jane Fonda' starring Anne Archer at Park Theatre at Finsbury Park - London, United Kingdom - Thursday 21st April 2016

Anne Archer
Anne Archer
Anne Archer
Anne Archer
Anne Archer
Anne Archer

Anne Archer - Saving Innocence 4th Annual Gala - Arrivals at SLS Hotel - Beverly Hills, California, United States - Sunday 18th October 2015

Anne Archer
Anne Archer
Kim Biddle and Anne Archer
Kim Biddle and Anne Archer
Erika Christensen, Kim Biddle and Anne Archer
Erika Christensen, Kim Biddle and Anne Archer

Anne Archer - 4th Annual Saving Innocence Gala at the SLS Hotel Beverly Hills - Inside at SLS Hotel - Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 17th October 2015

Anne Archer
Anne Archer
Anne Archer
Anne Archer
Anne Archer
Anne Archer

Anne Archer - The Human Rights Hero Awards 2015 presented by Marisol Nichols' Foundation for a Slavery Free World and Youth for Human Rights International at Beso - Inside at Beso - Los Angeles, California, United States - Monday 21st September 2015

Anne Archer
Anne Archer
Anne Archer
Anne Archer

Whispers: An Elephant's Tale Review


Weak
Here's an experiment that has worked in the past (The Adventures of Milo and Otis) but which doesn't quite fly this time out.

Whispers: An Elephant's Tale -- like all live-action kiddie-fare about animals with human voices -- is about a lost baby elephant and his presumably incredible journey to find his way back home to mom. While Whispers might look like a real baby elephant on your TV set, he has a real human voice (that sounds remarkably like Babe the pig's) -- only his lips don't really move when he talks. Niether do the other animals, who communicate with more sarcasm than you'll find in the typical episode of Friends.

Continue reading: Whispers: An Elephant's Tale Review

Narrow Margin (1990) Review


Good
It was an odd choice to remake a mediocre 1950s noir, but at least Gene Hackman is engaging as ever in the leading role, however slightly written it is. The cat-and-mouse game of the original is largely intact, with mobsters chasing after a woman (Anne Archer) who witnessed a murder, but whom they've never actually seen. Oh... and it's all on a train bound for Vancouver, which is, I guess, what the title vaguely alludes to. The film tragically never generates a lot of suspense, and Hackman and Archer never really generate much chemistry. The best part of the film is the very beginning, when Archer witnesses the murder of an all-too-briefly-appearing J.T. Walsh.

Patriot Games Review


Very Good
Out with Alec Baldwin and in with Harrison Ford -- as CIA analyst Jack Ryan becomes caught up in an international incident again as he lectures in London, throwing so much action at us that we are meant to forget they switched the lead actors on us.

Turns out it doesn't matter much. Ford is of course a talented action/adventure hero, maybe the best ever. It's too bad that this Jack Ryan adventure has less epic-ness than Red October; it's written small, with Ryan caught up in an IRA attack on British bigwigs. After capping off a few of them in an impromptu streetfight, Ryan finds his family hunted down in America. Eventually -- of course -- he has to save them (using his litany of superspy tricks and tactics).

Continue reading: Patriot Games Review

Short Cuts Review


Very Good
While one could argue that Robert Altman's 1993 film Short Cuts was simply an updating of his 1975 classic Nashville, with a much higher quotient of star power and slightly more prurient subject matter - an attempt to keep the once iconic filmmaker from straying into the shadowy irrelevance like so many of his '70s peers - and while that argument could very well be true, that doesn't deprive Short Cuts of any of its power, or disprove the fact that it's ultimately a better film.

Spinning together a series of short stories from the master of the form, Raymond Carver, Altman takes some 20-odd Los Angelenos and twists their lives together seemingly just for the fun of how their individual little lives play out and connect up, like a puppetmaster who can't stop adding new puppets to his repertoire. To flesh out his tapestry of early '90s Southern California life, Altman has a fine batch of actors and actresses, including everyone from the best of their generation (Jennifer Jason Leigh, Robert Downey Jr) to the solidly respectable but not terribly exciting choices (Julianne Moore, Matthew Modine, Madeleine Stowe) to oddly effective musician stunt casting (Lyle Lovett, Tom Waits, Huey Lewis) to one lordly presence (Jack Lemmon).

Continue reading: Short Cuts Review

The Art Of War Review


Terrible
Wesley Snipes is a master of selecting bad action roles. Murder at 1600, U.S. Marshals, Money Train, Drop Zone, Boiling Point, and the ultimate camp film - Passenger 57. The Art of War is another entry in this very ugly and unique category. Ultimately, it is little more than a ridiculous action film with a plot as believable as the Warren Report, ugly violence that would have made Peckinpah cringe, and terrible acting by B-list actors like Michael Biehn and Anne Archer. Oddly, it feels like the undiscovered sequel to another Snipes "masterpiece," Rising Sun.

The movie revolves around the convenient story of a special UN operative caught up in a secret murder conspiracy involving a Chinese ambassador, the Chinese Triad Brotherhood, a rich Chinese businessman (played by...that bad guy from Rising Sun, Cary-Hiroyuki Tagawa) a Chinese UN interpreter, and, inexplicably, Donald Sutherland. The film ends with more confusion than a boatload of Chinese immigrants trying to register at Ellis Island. Or should I say the film ends with the most blatant ripoff of both The Matrix and all of John Woo's Hong Kong films combined.

Continue reading: The Art Of War Review

Whispers: An Elephant's Tale Review


Weak
Here's an experiment that has worked in the past (The Adventures of Milo and Otis) but which doesn't quite fly this time out.

Whispers: An Elephant's Tale -- like all live-action kiddie-fare about animals with human voices -- is about a lost baby elephant and his presumably incredible journey to find his way back home to mom. While Whispers might look like a real baby elephant on your TV set, he has a real human voice (that sounds remarkably like Babe the pig's) -- only his lips don't really move when he talks. Niether do the other animals, who communicate with more sarcasm than you'll find in the typical episode of Friends.

Continue reading: Whispers: An Elephant's Tale Review

Man Of The House Review


Weak
Some films are so bad they bring shame even to the lowly reviewer who sits through them to make a lousy nickel. Man of the House is almost, but not quite, that bad.

The premise: Tommy Lee Jones plays a Texas Ranger who goes undercover in a girls' sorority house to protect five cheerleaders who have witnessed a murder -- is about as bad a concept as has ever been approved by a studio (at least until the Deuce Bigalow sequel comes out). But a funny thing about this film (about the only funny thing) is that the actors seem to be enjoying themselves -- especially Jones, whose droll, dry persona makes this film, if not a hoot, at least not a total travesty.

Continue reading: Man Of The House Review

Clear And Present Danger Review


OK
Jack Ryan returns for a third outing in Clear and Present Danger, reuniting Harrison Ford's Ryan with director Phillip Noyce, who also directed Ford-as-Ryan in Patriot Games.

Too bad that with plenty of raw material (notably Willem Dafoe as an American mercenary working in Columbia), Danger comes up awfully short. For starters, what is our CIA hero doing poking around in the Colubian drug trade? Sure, he's rooting out a huge conspiracy that goes all the way up the U.S. political ranks, but must we be subjected to endless Latino stereotypes en route to that? Clancy is always at his best when he's dealing with terrorists or Russians. Here we have a plot (nearly 2 1/2 hours in length) that trots out the usual exploding drug factories and endless cartel assassinations. Ryan's escape from a troublesome mission is infamous for the bad guys' repeated inability to hit a near-motionless target.

Continue reading: Clear And Present Danger Review

Fatal Attraction Review


Excellent
Finally released on DVD, Fatal Attraction proves itself just as deliciously thrilling as when it was first released in 1987.

Glenn Close's career got its first big boost in 1985's Jagged Edge, but her role as Fatal's Alex Forrest pushed her into stardom. She seems like a nice enough gal at the start -- though her hair could use some work, she's a witty and sexy book editor... just the right kind of gal to lure Michael Douglas's Dan Gallagher (a lawyer... married) into her bed. But Dan's crisis of conscience sends him scurrying home to his family in short order, only for Alex to start obsessing over their "relationship."

Continue reading: Fatal Attraction Review

The Art Of War Review


Weak

Cool as dry ice, Wesley Snipes comes off a two-year action movie hiatus like a bad-ass, black-belt James Bond with some ghetto in his blood in the opening scene of "The Art of War."

Dressed to the nines for a well-heeled Y2K New Year's Eve party in Hong Kong, he's doing a little workaday blackmailing of Chinese government officials when he is spotted by security and has to kung-fu his way out of there before parachuting off a skyscraper to escape.

Somebody shoots holes in his chute, but while Wes lands safely, the movie crashes face first into the pavement.

Continue reading: The Art Of War Review

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Anne Archer Movies

The Art of War Movie Review

The Art of War Movie Review

Wesley Snipes is a master of selecting bad action roles. Murder at 1600, U.S....

Man of the House Movie Review

Man of the House Movie Review

Some films are so bad they bring shame even to the lowly reviewer who sits...

Rules of Engagement Movie Review

Rules of Engagement Movie Review

The best thing about being a critic is getting to see unreleased films weeks and...

November Movie Review

November Movie Review

Something akin to a dialed-down Darren Aronofsky thriller-- with a lot of David Lynch thrown...

Man Of The House Movie Review

Man Of The House Movie Review

Friday, February 25, 2005If you're looking for a review of "Cursed" or "Man of the...

The Art Of War Movie Review

The Art Of War Movie Review

Cool as dry ice, Wesley Snipes comes off a two-year action movie hiatus like a...

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