Anna Chancellor

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'Frank Sinatra - The Man and His Music' - Arrivals

Anna Chancellor and Poppy Chancellor - 'Frank Sinatra - The Man and His Music' - Arrivals - London, United Kingdom - Monday 20th July 2015

Anna Chancellor and Poppy Chancellor
Anna Chancellor and Poppy Chancellor

Testament of Youth Trailer


Vera Brittain is an extraordinarily talented young woman who battles the odds to land herself a scholarship at Oxford University despite the attitudes of all the people around her frowning upon her desire to enter into a career in literature. Her life becomes even more promising when she falls for her brother's best friend Roland Leighton. However, the war is becoming ever closer and he is forced to abandon his own prestigious studies in favour of the frontline. Filled with grief over Roland's life-threatening circumstances, she decides to make the decision of a lifetime and leave her dreams behind. Instead, she decides to volunteer as a nurse for the sea of wounded troops that are yet to pour back into the country. Even as all that she holds dear are quickly annihilated by the vicious First World War, her determination keeps her focused on making the best of such horrors.

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London Evening Standard Theatre Awards - Arrivals

Anna Chancellor - London Evening Standard Theatre Awards held at the Savoy - Arrivals - London, United Kingdom - Sunday 17th November 2013

Anna Chancellor
Anna Chancellor

How I Live Now Review


Excellent

Remarkably bleak for a teen movie, this drama keeps us gripped as it throws its characters into an odyssey that's seriously harrowing. Gifted filmmaker Macdonald (The Last King of Scotland) and a fine young cast make sure that we feel every punch of emotion along the way. And the premise itself gets our minds spinning in unusual directions.

Set in the present day, violent uprisings are growing in Europe as 16-year-old Daisy (Ronan) heads from New York to Britain to spend the summer with her Aunt Penn (Chancellor) on a farm in rural Wales. A sullen loner, she tries to avoid her three chirpy cousins: the quiet genius Eddie (MacKay) is her age, while the more adventurous Isaac (Holland) is 14 and the younger Piper (Bird) is clingy and annoying. Then while Penn is away on business, the violence spreads to the UK, which descends into martial law. The cousins are divided and sent into care. But they promise to meet back at the farm, which is going to be an epic journey for Daisy and Piper if they can escape from their new home.

The story is told from Daisy's perspective, complete with glimpses into her troubled thoughts, dreams and nightmares. We're never sure why she is so deeply fearful of everything around her, but Ronan brings out her fragile mental state beautifully, then takes us along as Daisy is pushed to the limits and must find the inner strength to go forward. As a result, the other characters remain less-defined, although MacKay and Holland bring layers of interest to Eddie and Isaac. As Daisy's companion, Bird is much more present on-screen, and we're as irritated by her as Daisy is.

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How I Live Now Trailer


Saoirse Ronan stars in 'How I Live Now', a gripping adaptation of the prize winning novel of the same name by Meg Rosoff. Despite being defined as a children's or young adult's book, the adaptation portrays the horrific and damaging effect  war causes on human relationships and the effect it has on an individual, captivating a much wider demographic. 

What starts out as a romanticised coming-of-age, feel good film between two lovers takes a dramatic turn when war breaks out in a remote country village in England where lead character Daisy is visiting. Her recently found love with Edmond is unexpectedly tested when they are forced to part. The couple love is put to the test as they are unsure if they will ever be reunited.

The film stars Saoirse (The Lovely Bones, Hanna) as Daisy and George MacKay (Defiance, Peter Pan) as Edmond and is directed by Academy Award winning Director: Kevin Macdonald (The Last King of Scotland, One Day in September).

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Noël Coward's 'Private Lives' Hits The West End


Anna Chancellor Noel Coward Toby Stephens

Described as a 'comedy of manners' - a play that satirises different echelons of the social ladder - Noël Coward's 1930 three-act play centres on Elyot (Toby Stephens) and Amanda (Anna Chancellor) who have been divorced for five years when they run into each other again whilst on honeymoon with their new spouses. The coincidental encounter reignites the divorcee's former passion irrespective of the marital issues they previously had, or the feelings of their current partners.

Jonathan Kent
Director Jonathon Kent Likens Private Lives To An Exquisite Fabergé Egg.

The play had a successful run at Chichester's Festival theatre, lampooning the glamorous and reckless lives of the rich and will now, according to the theatre's website, "blaze across the West End stage this summer in an explosive production that proves Noël Coward still has the power to thrill, provoke and delight." Accomplished British lead actors Anna Chancellor (Four Weddings and a Funeral) and Toby Stephens (Die Another Day) are praised by The Telegraph for the "sense of unbuttoned intimacy and desire" between them in a "superb production [that] feels forever young, fresh and delightful."

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The Laurence Olivier Awards 2013

Anna Chancellor - The Laurence Olivier Awards 2013 held at the Royal Opera House - Arrivals - London, United Kingdom - Sunday 28th April 2013

The Olivier Awards

Allen Leech and Anna Chancellor - The Olivier Awards held at the Royal Opera House - Pressroom - London, United Kingdom - Sunday 28th April 2013

Allen Leech and Anna Chancellor
Allen Leech, Bunny Christie, Finn Ross and Anna Chancellor
Allen Leech, Jon Morrell and Anna Chancellor
Allen Leech, Bunny Christie, Finn Ross and Anna Chancellor

The Olivier Awards

Anna Chancellor - The Olivier Awards held at the Royal Opera House - Arrivals. - London, United Kingdom - Sunday 28th April 2013

Anna Chancellor
Anna Chancellor

Hysteria Review


OK

There's probably a fascinating, complex story behind the invention of the vibrator in 19th century London, but this silly farce isn't it. Instead, this is a comical romp that just happens to be set against the birth of the most popular sex toy in history. It's nicely assembled, with a strong cast, but the tone is so goofy that it never breaks the surface.

It's the late 1880s when young doctor Mortimer (Dancy) takes a job in London with Dalrymple (Pryce), who specialises in treating hysteria, considered a serious medical condition at the time, even though it seems to only afflict women whose husbands are neglecting them socially and sexually. As Mortimer courts Dalrymple's placid younger daughter (Jones), lining himself to take over the practice one day, it's the feisty older daughter (Gyllenhaal) who continually challenges his worldview. And as he treats his patients, Mortimer works with his friend Edmund (Everett) to create a mechanical vibrating device that has an immediate effect on his patients.

Everything in this story is played broadly, as if it's frightfully hilarious to talk about sex in such a straightforward way. But this prudish approach only trivialises everything about the story, from the premise to the characters themselves. And it doesn't help that the script never gives any of these people more than one or two key personality traits. The actors do what they can with them, adding moments of effective drama and comedy while hinting at the serious themes underneath the story. But it's so silly that we never really care about anything that happens.

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The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy Review


Good
Tolkein geeks have The Lord of the Rings. I have The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy. One of my most beloved book series as a youth (I still carry a towel in my trunk thanks to its advice), I even sat through (and enjoyed) the cheesy BBC miniseries made from the novels. So just so you know what you're getting into with this review: I'm a self-confessed overgrown fanboy on this one.

Decades in the making, Guide has been embroiled in controversy since the very beginning. The most recent round of complaints have covered pretty much the entire film, from casting (Mos Def taking a role commonly envisioned as a sort of British dandy) to directing (Garth Jennings is a music video veteran), to choice of writer Karey Kirkpatrick (a kiddie flick screenwriter best known for Chicken Run but also the writer of disastrous flicks The Little Vampire and Honey, We Shrunk Ourselves). Out of this, we've all been promised, genius would spring.

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What a Girl Wants Review


Grim
Don't be fooled by the title. Despite being named after a Christina Aguilera song, What a Girl Wants is not a movie about a good-girl-turned-trashy-ho. Rather, it's the story of a sweet, all-American girl who generally enjoys her life but can't get past one thing: She's never met her father. As her high school days come to an end, young Daphne Reynolds (Amanda Bynes) decides it's time to meet this mysterious man who managed to woo her mother so many years ago, and so she throws her passport into her backpack and heads off to London.

What ensues is a standard fairy tale: Daphne quickly finds her father, Henry (Colin Firth), but is hindered in her attempt to forge a meaningful relationship thanks to an evil stepmother and debutante stepsister who are only interested in Henry's status and wealth. Fortunately, Daphne's got her American charm on her side and, with the help of her wise grandmother and cute new boyfriend, she's able to win Henry's heart and even manages to get him back together with mom. They all live happily ever after, as we are told at the end.

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Crush Review


Good
While Andie MacDowell has spent much of the last few years in little-seen bombs like Just the Ticket, Reaching Normal, and the now-legendary Town & Country, she seems poised to re-emerge as a hot ticket in spring 2002. Perhaps not a huge, hot-selling ticket, but an actress whose skills and range will reach a larger audience than the ones provided by those previous duds. With Harrison's Flowers and the comedy-drama Crush, a primarily alterna-theater crowd will get to enjoy the woman they first met in sex, lies, and videotape - and in Crush, they'll get to see plenty more of the sex and the lies.

Brit John McKay's debut feature, based on his play, is a real girl's club, U.K. style. MacDowell plays Kate, an American living in an idyllic British country home, working as headmistress at a stuffy-looking school. Molly (Rachel Ward look-alike Anna Chancellor, from TV's Longitude) is a tough, sexy doctor, and Janine (Imelda Staunton of Rat and Chicken Run) is a sympathetic divorced Mom and a top police inspector. The three women, all single and in their early forties, stick together like bonding glue.

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The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy Review


OK
Imagine the madcap sensibilities of Monty Python appliedto science fiction and you'll begin to have an inkling of the whimsicallyeccentric humor of "The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy," anenormously successful cult-comedy franchise of which a new feature filmis only the latest incarnation.

The story of Arthur Dent (Martin Freeman), a nebbish Englishmansaved from the demolition of Earth (to make way for a hyperspace bypass)by an alien he'd hitherto thought was a pal from Gilford, "Hitchhiker'sGuide" follows his very reluctant and frequently absurd adventuresin space.

In the first 15 minutes alone, Arthur and Ford Prefect(Mos Def) are jettisoned from one of the ships that blew up the Earth (afterbeaming aboard surreptitiously, being captured and tortured with alienpoetry), then against all odds they're rescued from the vacuum of spaceseconds later by a passing vessel with a warp drive designed to exploitjust such unlikelihoods -- the Infinite Improbability Drive.

Onboard Arthur is improbably reunited with Trish McMillan(Zooey Deschanel), a girl he fell for at a party some months before, onlyto see her run off with Zaphod Bebblebox (Sam Rockwell), a guy who claimedto be from another planet. Zaphod, even more improbably, turns out to beFord's whacked-out semi-cousin (they share three of the same mothers) whobecame president of the galaxy just so he'd have the necessary clearanceto steal this very ship (because he thought it was cool).

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Agent Cody Banks 2: Destination London Review


Terrible

Last year's kiddie secret-agent comedy "Agent Cody Banks" was a stupid movie that got by on clever charm. It starred Frankie Muniz (from "Malcolm in the Middle") as a junior-high James Bond who had to get over his fear of talking to girls in order to complete his mission and save the world from some contrived evil.

The picture got a enough mileage out of Muniz's amusing believability as a secret agent on training wheels and out of its tongue-in-cheek twists (to keep his parents in the dark, the CIA did his homework and housework while he was on assignment) to balance out a lot of slapdash screenwriting -- so all in all, it squeaked by as good family fun.

But the rushed-into-production sequel "Agent Cody Banks 2: Destination London" is twice as stupid and without even an infinitesimal hint of the cleverness that kept the original afloat.

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Anna Chancellor

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