Ann Sheridan

Ann Sheridan

Ann Sheridan Quick Links

Film RSS

The Man Who Came To Dinner Review


OK
The Man Who Came to Dinner has traveled a long way: from stage (1939) to screen (1942) and then down through the decades to DVD, where we find it today. While this classic of erudite yet zany comedy still sparkles at times, the long trip has dulled some of its shine. What may have cracked people up way back then (references to ZaSu Pitts, calf's foot jelly, Katherine Cornell, long-distance operators, and Noel Coward) will leave today's audiences scratching their heads. Best to wait for the slapstick moments while imbibing on martinis.

George S. Kaufman and Moss Hart were master comic playwrights, and like You Can't Take It With You, The Man Who Came to Dinner is basically a drawing-room farce that spins more and more out of control as 20 or so main characters bounce off each other, hurl insults ("You flea-bitten Cleopatra!") and make wisecracks. At the center of the action is crusty old Sheridan Whiteside (Monty Woolley), a curmudgeonly New York critic (based on Alexander Woollcott, who starred in the show on Broadway) who breaks his leg while on tour in a provincial Ohio town. Taking up residence with the well-to-do and very flustered Mr. and Mrs. Stanley (Grant Mitchell and Billie Burke), he quickly makes their house his own, commandeering their telephone and their butler while his secretary Maggie (a blousy Bette Davis) and his nurse (Mary Wickes) scurry around catering to his every obnoxious whim.

Continue reading: The Man Who Came To Dinner Review

The Man Who Came To Dinner Review


OK
The Man Who Came to Dinner has traveled a long way: from stage (1939) to screen (1942) and then down through the decades to DVD, where we find it today. While this classic of erudite yet zany comedy still sparkles at times, the long trip has dulled some of its shine. What may have cracked people up way back then (references to ZaSu Pitts, calf's foot jelly, Katherine Cornell, long-distance operators, and Noel Coward) will leave today's audiences scratching their heads. Best to wait for the slapstick moments while imbibing on martinis.

George S. Kaufman and Moss Hart were master comic playwrights, and like You Can't Take It With You, The Man Who Came to Dinner is basically a drawing-room farce that spins more and more out of control as 20 or so main characters bounce off each other, hurl insults ("You flea-bitten Cleopatra!") and make wisecracks. At the center of the action is crusty old Sheridan Whiteside (Monty Woolley), a curmudgeonly New York critic (based on Alexander Woollcott, who starred in the show on Broadway) who breaks his leg while on tour in a provincial Ohio town. Taking up residence with the well-to-do and very flustered Mr. and Mrs. Stanley (Grant Mitchell and Billie Burke), he quickly makes their house his own, commandeering their telephone and their butler while his secretary Maggie (a blousy Bette Davis) and his nurse (Mary Wickes) scurry around catering to his every obnoxious whim.

Continue reading: The Man Who Came To Dinner Review

Angels With Dirty Faces Review


Very Good
Casablanca director Michael Curtiz turned in this pioneering entry in 1938 -- part of the budding street urchin genre that posed the question of what society would do with its troubled kids. Starring the Dead End Kids (a group of hooligans akin to the Litle Rascals, only meaner), their story is filtered through the eyes of two men. Rocky (James Cagney in another career-defining gangster performance) is fresh out of jail and back on the streets where he hopes to make some cash. Father Jerry (Pat O'Brien) is a priest and boyhood friend of Rocky's, who's managed to turn toward the path of good. Oh, and Humphrey Bogart makes an appearance as a scheming attorney through into the mix.

How these three men interrelate is the main story line, while the hijinks of the kids stands as a continuous backdrop to the action. Sometimes it's fierce, but just as often it's plodding and uninspiring. The underlying social commentary -- how children can turn good or bad depending on how they are raised, a controversial idea in the 1930s -- doesn't get much of a chance to shine, which may be a problem of too many stars, too many precocious child actors, and not enough legroom for all of them to stretch.

Continue reading: Angels With Dirty Faces Review

They Drive By Night Review


Good
Humphrey Bogart plays the lesser of two truck-driving brothers who get caught up in a murder plot courtesy of screaming starlet Ida Lupino, who caught a huge break with this film. The story is classic melodrama, with screwy dames, inquisitive coppers, and a screaming courtroom breakdown ("The doors made me do it!"). Amusing in the end but hardly a classic.
Ann Sheridan

Ann Sheridan Quick Links

Film RSS
Advertisement

Occupation

Actor


Suggested

Janelle Monae - Crazy, Classic, Life Video

Janelle Monae - Crazy, Classic, Life Video

Janelle Monáe parties and drives with her girl squad in the video for her latest single 'Crazy, Classic, Life', taken from her album 'Dirty...

Bring Me The Horizon - Medicine Video

Bring Me The Horizon - Medicine Video

Continuing the softer sound of their 2015 release 'That's the Spirit', BMTH are about to release 'Amo' (January 25th 2019) featuring their newest...

Sam Smith - Fire On Fire Video

Sam Smith - Fire On Fire Video

To coincide with the new BBC mini-series adaptation of leporine epic Watership Down, Sam Smith has unveiled a new single entitled 'Fire on Fire'.

Fleur East - Favourite Thing Video

Fleur East - Favourite Thing Video

Her first single since leaving the jungle on 'I'm a Celebrity... Get Me Out of Here!', Fleur East drops the super-choreographed video for 'Favourite...

Advertisement
Olly Murs - Excuses Video

Olly Murs - Excuses Video

Dropping the video for his latest album's second single, 'Excuses', is Olly Murs just months after the release of 'Moves' featuring Snoop Dogg.

Professor Green - Photographs ft. Rag'n'Bone Man Video

Professor Green - Photographs ft. Rag'n'Bone Man Video

Professor Green and Rag'n'Bone Man have teamed up for a heart-wrenching video for their single 'Photographs'.

Ice Cube - That New Funkadelic Video

Ice Cube - That New Funkadelic Video

He released 'Everythang's Corrupt' last month, and now Ice Cube has dropped a video for the record's third single 'That New Funkadelic'.

Dappy - Count On Me (Acoustic) Video

Dappy - Count On Me (Acoustic) Video

Dappy has unveiled a new stripped down number entitled 'Count On Me' more than six years after the release of his debut solo album.

Advertisement

Ann Sheridan Movies

The Man Who Came to Dinner Movie Review

The Man Who Came to Dinner Movie Review

The Man Who Came to Dinner has traveled a long way: from stage (1939) to...

The Man Who Came to Dinner Movie Review

The Man Who Came to Dinner Movie Review

The Man Who Came to Dinner has traveled a long way: from stage (1939) to...

Advertisement
Angels With Dirty Faces Movie Review

Angels With Dirty Faces Movie Review

Casablanca director Michael Curtiz turned in this pioneering entry in 1938 -- part of the...

Artists
Actors
    Filmmakers
      Artists
      Bands
        Musicians
          Artists
          Celebrities
             
              Artists
              Interviews
                musicians & bands in the news
                  actors & filmmakers in the news
                    celebrities in the news

                      Go Back in Time using our News archive to see what happened on a particular day in the past.