Angie Dickinson

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Angie Dickinson, Linda Evans, Nichelle Nichols and Stefanie Powers Sunday 16th January 2011 Angie Dickinson, Nichelle Nichols, Stefanie Powers and Linda Evans at the 92Y promoting the new season of PBS Pioneers of Television New York City, USA

Angie Dickinson, Linda Evans, Nichelle Nichols and Stefanie Powers
Angie Dickinson, Nichelle Nichols and Stefanie Powers
Angie Dickinson
Angie Dickinson

Angie Dickinson Monday 10th May 2010 The Hollywood Post Office station on Wilcox Avenue is dedicated to the memory of the late honorary mayor of Hollywood, Johnny Grant. Los Angeles, California

Angie Dickinson
Angie Dickinson
Angie Dickinson
Angie Dickinson

Big Bad Mama Review


Very Good
William Shatner and Tom Skerritt would probably rather you forget about the infamous Big Bad Mama, one of the best-known exploitation films ever made. Thanks begin with Shatner and Skerritt, both starring as pervy hangers-on to the film's star -- and the reason why Mama is so widely seen -- Angie Dickinson, a 43-year-old bombshell who turns to crime in order to keep her two trollop daughters clothed. Barely.

Using Bonnie & Clyde as its obvious base, producer Roger Corman and director Steve Carver add in a second Clyde, plus a little extra skin in the form of two teenage daughters who always seem to be falling out of their slips. Holding this clan together is Wilma McClatchie (Dickinson), who almost accidentally launches on a career of crime -- robbery, bank heists, and kidnapping, with an unknown goal in sight.

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Pay It Forward Review


Good
The very idea behind Pay It Forward -- that when someone does an enormous good deed for you should pay it "forward" to three other, unsuspecting persons -- requires what is described in the film as "an extreme act of faith in the goodness of people."

It's safe to say that your enjoyment of the film is bound by this same rule. Dyed-in-the-wool film critics like myself have been down this road once or twice before, and the enormous leap of faith it takes to convince oneself that, deep down, even "bad" people are good makes me want to reach for my DVD of A Clockwork Orange.

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Point Blank Review


Good
Classic cinema badass Lee Marvin gets a whole movie to strut his stuff in Point Blank, the first cinematic version of the book originally called The Hunter, which was later made into the improbably hit Payback. (The Hunter, of course, can now be found under the title Payback as well.)

The story is almost obliviously simple: Lee Marvin is a mafioso who's been turned on and left for dead. But not quite dead: He comes back (from the grave? who knows...) to get his vengeance. Or more precisely, to get the $93,000 he is owed by his former bosses.

Continue reading: Point Blank Review

Rio Bravo Review


Very Good
Dean Martin as "Dude the Drunk," eh? Why not -- it works in Rio Bravo a favorite among Western enthusiasts that nonetheless is far too long, spending too long setting up the story before getting to the powerful finale. Wayne is good, but Dean-o steals the show along with Walter Brennan's crusty jailkeeper, who owns every scene he's in. A definitive piece of Americana by way of Howard Hawks, Rio Bravo is what the late 1950s studio system was all about.

Even Cowgirls Get The Blues Review


Terrible
A pair of wildly divergent views on Gus Van Sant's Even Cowgirls Get the Blues... -Ed.

Don Willmott, 1 star [lowest rating]

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Dressed To Kill Review


Very Good
Angie Dickenson isn't the one that's dressed to kill -- she's dressed to get killed. When she gets butchered by a razor-wielding mystery woman in an elevator, it's up to a cop (Dennis Franz) and her shrink (Michael Caine) to figure out who offed the nymphomaniacal Angie. Oh, and Angie's son teams up with the hooker who witnessed the murder to do an investigation of their own.

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Ocean's Eleven (1960) Review


Good
Implausible yet wholly unforgettable, Ocean's Eleven is as much fun as it is a misogynistic relic of a bygone era. Essentially, the Rat Pack of Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin, Sammy Davis Jr., and Peter Lawford are playing themselves as ex-military playboy buddies who decide to pull off a daring heist on New Year's Eve, robbing five Las Vegas casinos in one fell swoop. As it turns out, the heist itself is kind of a forgettable letdown, as is the aftermath involving an investigation into the matter by Lawford's character's future stepfather (Cesar Romero). Even the setup takes close to an hour, as Billy Ocean (Sinatra) woos his lady and slowly gathers his crew -- all while Martin and Davis provide musical accompaniment. The end result is more than two hours of heist work that would make David Mamet cringe.

So why watch Sinatra and his 10 (not 11) ex-military buddies romp through their kinda town? Ocean's Eleven is the kind of movie you turn on and just hang out to, just like the Rat Pack would have done, as you enjoy a scotch and soda on a Saturday afternoon while Dean Martin croons "Ain't that a kick in the head..." in the background. Then you'd go bowling in an orange sweater to talk about the job. When it's over, you won't feel like you've bettered yourself in any way, but you might feel just an inch of kinship with a bygone era when Vegas was black tie-only and when a woman's place was in a distant, supporting role. (Just kidding, dames.)

Continue reading: Ocean's Eleven (1960) Review

Big Bad Love Review


Very Good
Based on a short story collection by Mississippi writer Larry Brown, Big Bad Love is a collage of the "hard country life", following the drunken routines of Leon Barlow (Arliss Howard).

Leon is a shiftless alcoholic, though obviously still a talented writer with his mixture of adjective clauses and ability to envelop anyone around him into an environment he is describing. He's separated from his wife (Debra Winger) with whom he had two children, and he has difficulty playing the part of father, even as he tries to win back his ex-wife's affections.

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Pay It Forward Review


Weak

At the helm of "Pay It Forward," director Mimi Leder becomes such a manipulatively mawkish emotional puppeteer that it feels as if she's tossing tear gas grenades into the audience.

Adapted from Catherine Ryan Hyde's novel about emotional and physical scars, symbolic martyrdom and saving the world with deliberate acts of compassion, it's a story that would be difficult to tell without pulling a few heartstring. But ye-owch! Does she have to yank so hard?

The peerless Kevin Spacey stars as Eugene Simonet, a bottled-up, austere junior high social studies teacher with burn scars over much of his body and face. He opens every school year by offering extra credit to any student who can "think of an idea to change our world and put it into action."

Continue reading: Pay It Forward Review

Duets Review


Terrible

The opening scene of "Duets" is a gem. '80s yuppie-rocker Huey Lewis walks into a karaoke bar sporting shop-class glasses and a thrift shop polyester suit. Turning the doofus volume up to 10, he starts popping off about how this singing-along thing doesn't look so tough, and before long he's bet the joint's champion amateur crooner a fat wad of cash that he can win the evening's singing competition.

Way before the hayseed patrons catch on, you've realized Huey is a fly-by-night karaoke hustler! What a great comic concept. As he belts out a Joe Cocker tune and takes off with the money, you'll even be reminded of how annoyingly catchy Huey Lewis and the News' cheesy pop anthems were way back when.

But then he goes home with some bar tramp at the end of the night, and the movie's tone goes into a steep tailspin of narrative miscalculations and cinematic ineptitude that ends in a crash with no survivors. Instantly you can't stand this Lewis' character. He's exposed as a sorry, irresponsible slimebag. To make matters worse, when he's not singing, Lewis' acting is so wooden that if you were there when he fell in the forest, you still wouldn't hear anything.

Continue reading: Duets Review

Angie Dickinson

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Angie Dickinson Movies

Pay It Forward Movie Review

Pay It Forward Movie Review

The very idea behind Pay It Forward -- that when someone does an enormous good...

Even Cowgirls Get The Blues Movie Review

Even Cowgirls Get The Blues Movie Review

A pair of wildly divergent views on Gus Van Sant's Even Cowgirls Get the Blues......

Ocean's Eleven (1960) Movie Review

Ocean's Eleven (1960) Movie Review

Implausible yet wholly unforgettable, Ocean's Eleven is as much fun as it is a misogynistic...

Pay It Forward Movie Review

Pay It Forward Movie Review

At the helm of "Pay It Forward," director Mimi Leder becomes such a manipulatively mawkish...

Duets Movie Review

Duets Movie Review

The opening scene of "Duets" is a gem. '80s yuppie-rocker Huey Lewis walks into a...

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