Angelica Huston

Angelica Huston

Angelica Huston Quick Links

News Pictures Film Quotes RSS

The 87th Annual Oscars - Vanity Fair Oscar Party

Angelica Huston - The 87th Annual Oscars - Vanity Fair Oscar Party at Wallis Annenberg Center for the Performing Arts and The Beverly Hills City Hall - Arrivals at Wallis Annenberg Center, Oscars - Beverly Hills, California, United States - Sunday 22nd February 2015

Angelica Huston

Picture - Angelica Huston and Debra Messing , Tuesday 20th March 2012

Angelica Huston and Debra Messing - Angelica Huston and Debra Messing Tuesday 20th March 2012 The Gotham Magazine Cover Party - Arrivals

Angelica Huston and Debra Messing

Seraphim Falls Review


Terrible
Director David Von Ancken's first feature after a lengthy stint in television shows his influence and experience without the slightest sense of shading. Out of the gate, Von Ancken found himself at the helm of Law & Order disciples CSI: NY and Cold Case, not to mention HBO's seminal Oz, and has been making his living at these shows ever since. Now, faced with a tale of post-Civil War vengeance, Ancken not only has to deal with the problem of sustaining fluidity, but of heftier emotional weight.Gideon (Pierce Brosnan) hides in the snowy drifts of the Ruby Mountains in northern Nevada. His hide has become a sought-after item; after a misunderstanding in the final days of the Civil War, Gideon's cold ignorance caused the unneeded death of one man's family. That man in question, Carver (Liam Neeson), has hired a trio of bandits to hunt down Gideon and exact what Carver sees as very just revenge.Much like Mel Gibson's misbegotten Apocalypto, Seraphim Falls takes its surroundings and time period simply as hallmark images to frame what is, sadly, a rather rudimentary look at vengeance and survival. Putting aside the outfits washed in waves of dirt and the small spurts of dialogue, the film could have taken place at any time and seems uninterested in exploring how the world the men inhabit and their time period affect their decisions.There's also a timid nature to the camerawork that sticks out. As Carver and his band of miscreants trails Gideon, they stomp through snowy mountains, faith-based wagon towns, and cracked-earth deserts. These areas seem flat and lacking character under Von Ancken and cinematographer John Toll, who somehow is also responsible for the shattering imagery of Terrence Malick's revelatory The Thin Red Line.The bland photography puts acute pressure on the actors to keep things popping, and most of the actors seem to take their roles with a passive grasp of character. Michael Wincott, an actor who oozes menace, is regulated as a rather forgettable sidekick to Carver, where he would have been more at home with the role of Carver. When Carver's men start getting picked off, the action gives a slight pulse to what is mostly a tepid pool up until then. After the final (and best) death scene, the two men, both visited by a strange bargainer (a particularly wasted Angelica Huston), face each other for a showdown.Seraphim Falls brings a hammering reminder that Westerns can still be made under tired eyes and loose constructs. Where the last few years have brought some strong evocations of the genre (The Proposition, The Three Burials of Melquiades Estrada) and just last week we were blessed by Tears of the Black Tiger, Von Ancken seems to take the basics of his genre as reassurance that he doesn't have to try as hard to make them work. As it is, Von Ancken can't seem to get his concentration away from the episodic nature of the small screen.Uncle Owen and Luke seem pretty upset.

Art School Confidential Review


Excellent
Few things are more mystifying to outsiders than the world of modern art. Which of course makes it the perfect backdrop for a Terry Zwigoff film. Where else is eccentricity, flamboyance, and pretension considered normal? And who's more alienated and misunderstood than an art student rejected by his art school classmates, who are, quite naturally, alienated and misunderstood themselves? Art School Confidential, Zwigoff's latest, mines this territory for humor and poignancy, raising questions about the nature of art and alienation.As in Zwigoff's previous films, which include Crumb, Ghost World, and Bad Santa, Art School's hero is far from heroic. Played by Max Minghella, with his dark eyes and brooding bushy brows, Jerome Platz is a young art student whose primary aspiration is to be the greatest artist of the 21st century, the next Picasso. His secondary concern -- to find an emotional, intellectual, erotic connection with a woman -- proves even more ambitious since he feels only one girl, luminous art model Audrey (Sophia Myles), is worthy of his attention.The trouble is, after an initial connection with Jerome, Audrey shifts her attention to another freshman painter, the hunky Jonah, whose simple, innocent paintings have turned him into something of a campus hero. In order to win Audrey back, Jerome asks for the help of Jimmy (Jim Broadbent), a bitter, reclusive, alcoholic painter. Broadbent's performance is the film's strongest, which is saying something in a film packed with celebrated actors. His Jimmy is sensitive and fearsome, wise, and terrible -- all at once. At several points in the film, during fits of artistic pique, Jimmy's eyes flash with anger and fix on Jerome -- and the misery of a rotten, wasted life paralyzes both Jerome and the audience. The jolting power of these moments, of Broadbent's poisonous eyes, makes his turn a thing to behold.Jerome's classmates and instructors at the Strathmore Institute figure prominently in the film's wry exploration of what makes good art good, and what makes the truest art timeless. Professor Sandiford (John Malkovich) is a failed painter who is unable to see Jerome's talent and potential but wouldn't mind sleeping with him. Jerome's roommate Vince (Ethan Suplee, of TV's My Name Is Earl) is a fast-talking, sexually obsessed film student. And Jerome's friend Bardo is a talentless, wayward womanizer who doesn't belong in art school. Several heavyweight actors play the bit parts that round out the cast, including Angelica Huston as a sage art history professor, Steve Buscemi as a freewheeling gallery owner, and Michael Lerner as a greedy art dealer.Art School marks Zwigoff's second collaboration with Daniel Clowes, who wrote both the screenplay and the graphic novel on which it was based. Their first collaboration, the 2001 film Ghost World, earned them an avalanche of critical praise and an Academy Award nomination for Best Adapted Screenplay. However, Art School isn't as good as Ghost World, despite their abundant similarities. The connection between the central characters in Ghost World, Thora Birch's Enid and Buscemi's Seymour, was fascinating, odd, and easily understood. Jerome and Audrey's relationship, meanwhile, never takes shape, partly because Audrey's character is completely lifeless. Zwigoff and Clowes never get around to showing us who she is or what she wants. It's never clear why she would turn her back on Jerome to pursue Jonah when she knows better than anyone that Jerome is the real talent.Such problems keep Art School from the heights of achievement of Ghost World and Crumb, but don't keep it from being a provocative, entertaining movie. Art School will go down as a minor work from the maker of off-kilter gems.Between you and me...

The Royal Tenenbaums Review


Essential
Family isn't based on sweet kisses on the cheek. Affection between parent and child is not established by saying the magical phrase "I love you." Instead, the strongest conversations often come through in stares and sarcastic remarks. As the old saying goes, you only hurt the ones you love, and family members are usually first in line.

This adage is wholly true for the Tenenbaums, a charismatic dysfunctional family set in a slightly surreal New York City. With an all-star cast and crisp dialogue, this film does what many other films of its genre lack -- it creates a family environment that is entertaining as well as easy to relate to.

Continue reading: The Royal Tenenbaums Review

Kaena: The Prophecy Review


Grim
This feature-length CGI-animated 3-D film, a first for France, is startling in its design of a vine and root enveloped world whose spaces and shapes are the stuff of ghoulish visions and eerie nightmares. The visual sensibility behind it is truly impressive, but a mucked up narrative makes for a universe of confusion.

Rebellious Kaena (voiced by Kirsten Dunst), a dynamic teen with a body that's as attention-getting as her acrobatic skill, defies the Grand Priest when she discovers that his promises to save Axis, her village, by obtaining life-sustaining sap, are based on lies and deceptions. Imploring the gods is simply not working. The shortage of the vital fluid is caused by The Queen (Anjelica Huston), a telepathic menace whose voice is a weapon of destruction. She's been hoarding the supply to use as a sacrifice to her gods in order to get them on her evil side.

Continue reading: Kaena: The Prophecy Review

Angelica Huston

Angelica Huston Quick Links

News Pictures Film Quotes RSS