Andrew Howard

Andrew Howard

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Andrew Howard - Billy Morrison presents 'Mixed Messages' at The Desmond - Arrivals - Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 11th June 2016

Andrew Howard
Andrew Howard
Andrew Howard

Andrew Howard - BritWeek 2015: 9th Annual Brit Week Launch at British Consul Generals Residence - Arrivals - Los Angeles, California, United States - Tuesday 21st April 2015

Andrew Howard
Andrew Howard

Paul Hollywood and Andrew Howard - Paul Hollywood, the nation's best-known baker and star of the Great British Bake Off took part in his inaugural race for Beechdean AMR this weekend, as he officially announces his move into the motorsport field. Paul was taking part in his first ever competitive races in the Britcar Sports and Touring car Championship, alongside 2013 British GT champion Andrew Howard. Paul and Andrew finished a creditable 2nd in class in both races with a 4th overall in the last of the televised events. Paul has now fulfilled a lifelong dream to get behind the wheel of a high performance racing car in a competitive event. However, Paul will continue to race in the Beechdean GT4, culminating in an appearance at the Le Mans Festival in June 2015. The overall objective is to work towards Paul racing at the highest possible level, taking part in the Le Mans itself in future is the ultimate dream. Andrew Howard, owner of Beechdean AMR said "Paul's enthusiasm for cars and racing comes across strongly. Once he was behind the wheel, it quickly became apparent that he is a focussed racing driver and has the talent to race a car. The aim is to take Paul through various categories of competitive racing, from GT4, GT3 through to GTE and then, backing dependent, on to the big prize; the time we've spent together on the track and his first race performance suggest that this is attainable." Paul, a long term racing fan, has been working with Andrew - who also owns Beechdean Ice Cream Group, one of the UK's largest ice cream producers - for the past few months to reach a competitive level. Paul comments "I thought baking was difficult to learn, but racing takes it to a whole new level. I hoped that I'd be a natural and that it would be intuitive but I've really had to work for it. It's been no piece of cake." He will be racing at Brands Hatch, Oulton Park, and ultimately the Le Mans Festival. "There'll be more to come from Beechdean Ice Cream Group and Paul - w - Silverstone, United Kingdom - Friday 27th March 2015

Paul Hollywood and Andrew Howard
Paul Hollywood and Andrew Howard

Andrew Howard - "A Salute to Old Hollywood Party" to Celebrate the Launch of BritWeek 2013 - Los Angeles, California, United States - Tuesday 23rd April 2013

Andrew Howard
Andrew Howard
Andrew Howard

Andrew Howard Saturday 22nd September 2012 HISTORY hosts a Pre-Emmy party at Soho House in celebration of sixteen Hatfields & McCoys Emmy nominations

Andrew Howard
Andrew Howard
Andrew Howard
Andrew Howard

Limitless Review


Excellent
Despite a rather incomplete premise, this sleek thriller barrels full-steam through its plot. It's involving and entertaining, and sometimes even thought-provoking. And it gives Cooper a role that perfectly uses his skills as an actor.

Plagued by writer's block, Eddie (Cooper) has become a scruffy loser, which prompts high-flying girlfriend Lindy (Cornish) to dump him. Then his drug-dealing ex-brother-in-law (Whitworth) offers him a clear pill called NZT that lets him access all of his brain. Suddenly, words flow freely and his mind races ahead, learning languages (the better for bedding beautiful women) and working the stock market. But his moneymaking schemes put him in league with both a nasty Russian loanshark (Howard) and a fat-cat businessman (De Niro), just as NZT's dark side-effects kick in.

Continue reading: Limitless Review

Limitless Trailer


Eddie Mora is a wanna-be writer who lacks direction in his life. A former drug addict Eddie's stuck in a job working as a copywriter for a small publishing house and technically this brilliant novelist still has to write the first line of his book. When a dealer offers him a mysterious new drug called NZT that's meant to unlock 100% of the brains capacity, Eddie's dubious of what the drug promises, but almost immediately, he finds himself a new person, focussed and determined the old Eddie is never coming back.

Continue: Limitless Trailer

Moonlight Review


Very Good
When we first meet Claire, a privileged teenager growing up in her parents' opulent home, she is in shock. She's been carefully practicing piano in an immaculate room when she experiences the initial drops of her first menstrual cycle. Frightened, she retreats to the family shed, where more shock awaits. A young, orphaned drug courier has been hiding out there, left for dead with a gunshot to the belly.

With no common language, these two connect instantly -- perhaps it's the blood -- and embark on an emotionally wrenching journey in this visually appealing, occasionally heavy-handed thriller from Paula van der Oest (Dutch director of the Oscar-nominated Zus & Zo).

Continue reading: Moonlight Review

Heights Review


Weak
Since the modern cinema could easily be said to have a chronic Glenn Close deficiency, it seemed just peachy when the 24-hours-in-some-New-Yorkers'-lives flick Heights opened with a good dose of the lady herself, only to see watch the film spend far too much of the rest of it dealing with other, lesser characters. Close plays Diana Lee, a famous actress moonlighting as an acting teacher who, in that opening scene, tears apart two of her students in front of the whole class, castigating them for their rote recitations of Macbeth. She declaims the modern age's loss of grand emotions and the substitution of meekness, fairly screaming at her worshipful wannabes, "Passion!" If only the movie that proceeded from that point had followed her advice.

As possibly the last film to come out from Merchant Ivory Productions before the May 2005 passing away of Ismail Merchant, Heights is a good deal more lively than the stiff-necked product the duo became known for, but still suffers from a certain bloodlessness. Based on a one-act play and stretched to its limit, the film follows a few New Yorkers through their day as they run about Chelsea and downtown, leading artistic lives and holding some very obvious secrets. Somewhere along the way the viewer is supposed to go "ah!" as the disparate elements come clicking together, but they're more likely to have lost interest at that point, as the light comedy is continually interspersed with a leavening of twentysomething lassitude.

Continue reading: Heights Review

Moonlight Review


Very Good
When we first meet Claire, a privileged teenager growing up in her parents' opulent home, she is in shock. She's been carefully practicing piano in an immaculate room when she experiences the initial drops of her first menstrual cycle. Frightened, she retreats to the family shed, where more shock awaits. A young, orphaned drug courier has been hiding out there, left for dead with a gunshot to the belly.

With no common language, these two connect instantly -- perhaps it's the blood -- and embark on an emotionally wrenching journey in this visually appealing, occasionally heavy-handed thriller from Paula van der Oest (Dutch director of the Oscar-nominated Zus & Zo).

Continue reading: Moonlight Review

The Cherry Orchard Review


Very Good
Actors understandably welcome the opportunity to perform Chekhov, whose plays are painfully funny in their quiet observation of human folly. In Uncle Vanya and The Three Sisters, we recognize some part of ourselves. Renowned director Michael Cacoyannis, who helmed Zorba the Greek in 1964, assembles a powerhouse international cast for his screen interpretation of The Cherry Orchard, including Alan Bates (Gosford Park), Katrin Cartlidge (Breaking the Waves), and Melanie Lynskey (Heavenly Creatures). That great horror actor Michael Gough is well typecast as an ancient butler, and grand dame Charlotte Rampling's timeless iconic presence lends itself beautifully to the tragic Madame Lyubov Andreyevna Raneskaya.

Despite the remarkable assemblage of talent, Cacoyannis' Cherry Orchard feels self-aware of adapting a renowned classic from stage to screen. The cinematography is handsome and stately, but more appropriate to the colorful orchards and vast family estate, the 1900 costumes, the theatrical entrances and exits, than to the intimacy of Chekhov's vivid characters. (It almost makes one long for the hand-held documentary treatment of Louis Malle's seminal Vanya on 42nd Street.) The stylistic choices here take a while to get used to, especially during a drawn-out prologue, absent in the original text, as Madame Lyubov and her buoyant teenage daughter Anna (Tushka Bergen) make elaborate preparations to return to their Russian estate after a self-imposed exile. Some may be exhausted by this Masterpiece Theater treatment (lingering over every piece of luggage) before Chekhov's social entanglements kick in -- which happens shortly after the dozen major characters have assembled at their estate.

Continue reading: The Cherry Orchard Review

Heights Review


Good

A deft ensemble drama with a hard emotional veracity ref=lectingthe complexity that sexual histories impose on modern relationships, "=Heights"takes place over 24 hours that prove unexpectedly pivotal to each of itsof cross-pollinating Manhattan lives.

At the center of one of the film's concentric social circ=lesis Isabel (Elizabeth Banks, "Seabiscuit,&=quot;"CatchMe If You Can"), an aspiring photographe=r,stuck in a rut of wedding assignments. Her engagement to handsome younglawyer Jonathan (James Marsden) is tempered by subtle undercurrents ofuncertainty that may be tested by a pining ex-boyfriend's offer of a dreamassignment for a prestigious news magazine.

Isabel's mother Diana (Glenn Close) -- a blunt, outwardlyself-confident, highly respected stage actress and theater professor atJulliard -- is the hub of another, upper-crust conclave. Her quite liberalopen marriage has taken its toll on her psychological buoyancy (and herdaughter's views of fidelity), especially in the wake of her husband'scurrent philandering with her own understudy from a Broadway productionof "Macbeth."

Continue reading: Heights Review

Andrew Howard

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There's already an Oscars buzz surrounding this movie.

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Andrew Howard Movies

Limitless Movie Review

Limitless Movie Review

Despite a rather incomplete premise, this sleek thriller barrels full-steam through its plot. It's involving...

Limitless Trailer

Limitless Trailer

Eddie Mora is a wanna-be writer who lacks direction in his life. A former drug...

Moonlight Movie Review

Moonlight Movie Review

When we first meet Claire, a privileged teenager growing up in her parents' opulent home,...

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Heights Movie Review

Heights Movie Review

Since the modern cinema could easily be said to have a chronic Glenn Close deficiency,...

Moonlight Movie Review

Moonlight Movie Review

When we first meet Claire, a privileged teenager growing up in her parents' opulent home,...

Heights Movie Review

Heights Movie Review

A deft ensemble drama with a hard emotional veracity ref=lectingthe complexity that sexual histories impose...

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